Any Feeder drivers in CA?

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by NickT916, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. NickT916

    NickT916 New Member

    I have been package driver for over a year, at the moment im injured, I might be going in for training for a feeder job when i return back to work and was wondering if there are any feeder drivers here, id like to know how you guys like it and how many hours a week you put in and how long you have been doing feeders?
     
  2. Yes, I got into feeder recently but am just a back up driver right now. I have done a few routes. all routes are 12 hours but the work is easy compaired to package. feeder school is intense. you have to learn a lot in 2 weeks. inspection of the tracter inside and out ( once a day ) inspection of every trailer you hook up to. just for a rear wheel for instance ( 2/32 of tread depth, no uneven wear, no nails or bolts in tire, no cuts, cord or fabric on tire walls, kick tire to test pressure, no objects stuck between duel tires. no illeagle welds on wheel, no cracks, lug nuts tight no cracks or rust that would indicate a problem, metal valve steam and cap, check the hub oil) just driving that thing at first is scary for everyone but you get over it, just stick with it no matter how bad it seems. it took me a week to get over thinking I was going to hit every car parked on the side of the road. I had nervousness that would come and go for about the first month and a half but after that life is goooooooooood!!!!! driving feeder is like working for a whole different company. they treat you like a human, you have more then enough time to do the job, everyone you work with is happy and will help you before you can ask. and as you are driving down the road listening to you radio with the AC on you are making more money then you did in package. anyone can retire on this job. a typical route. afternoon start time 330pm , do maybe 3 to 6 pickups ( pull and empty and load up pallets move to back with pallet jack fast and easy) or there maybe trailers loaded by the customer that you just go and pick up. then wait till the out going volume is loaded at your center then take it to the the hub then bring back the delivery volume for your center, then go home. I left out the details but this is basicly what everyone does. where you actually go depends on what center you work out of but once you know the few places you will have to go its a easy life. the only hard thing for some guys is getting enough sleep during the day so your not sleepy while driving at night. good luck and get your name on that feeder list now.
     
  3. UPS.driver

    UPS.driver New Member

    Well said,.... some parts FUNNY, but well said.


    27 year feeder driver :)


    t took me a week to get over thinking I was going to hit every car parked on the side of the road. I had nervousness that would come and go for about the first month and a half but after that life is goooooooooood!!!!! driving feeder is like working for a whole different company. they treat you like a human, you have more then enough time to do the job, everyone you work with is happy
     
  4. raceanoncr

    raceanoncr Well-Known Member


    Everything here is true...EXCEPT...if it gets in the way of production!!!!

    THEN...you have to go NOW!!!!!! Forget about the BOP! You have to go NOW!!!!!

    Forget about SAFETY!!! You have to go NOW!!!!!
     
  5. MR_Vengeance

    MR_Vengeance United Parcel Survivor

    i'd do it anywhere else except your hub.
     
  6. helenofcalifornia

    helenofcalifornia Well-Known Member

    I thought the hardest part of being a feeder driver is trying to stay at the 55 MPH speed limit. And also coming up with a cool handle for all the radio chatter.
     
  7. Crazy Diamond

    Crazy Diamond Robot Extraordinaire


    No governors on those things?
     
  8. sendagain

    sendagain Member

    I suppose pulling trailers on icey nights might cause a little nail biting; I know we have rigs that have to go over the Grapevine in Southern Cal when a storm blows through. I suspect taking a rig over to Nevada during the Santa Ana winds would be a white knuckler as well.