Can GPS be unconstitutional?

Discussion in 'UPS Union Issues' started by 804brown, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. 804brown

    804brown Well-Known Member

  2. hypocrisy

    hypocrisy Banned

    Kinda hard to argue that UPS wouldn't be allowed to track the vehicles they own. Better to argue they cannot use the technology for discipline but have to get their fat asses out on the street and witness it.
     
  3. 804brown

    804brown Well-Known Member

    BUt if they are tracking our diads, they are tracking us too not just the truck.
     
  4. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

  5. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    If you work for them, aren't you in a financial relationship with them that they can show a legitimate business need to know the whereabouts of their "partners"?

    True story. I had a driver who left on a Friday morning cashed his check and was not heard from again until Monday morning. I could not have claimed that the driver "stole" the truck because of the "employer/employee" relationship determined he had legitimate control of the vehicle even though his use (or nonuse) of the vehicle was illegitimate.
     
  6. hypocrisy

    hypocrisy Banned

    Eh, sorry about that. I was moving. Thanks for saving me the U-haul rental.
     
  7. brett636

    brett636 Well-Known Member

    You can't make a constitutional argument on the treatment of an employee by an employer. They are both based in the private sector, and the constitution is exclusively meant to control the treatment of the people by the government. We have no constitutional argument on whether or not the company tracks us via gps. It's the company's vehicles and we are the company's employees. If you don't like being tracked via gps you can quit, and go work elsewhere or even start your own delivery company. You have no right to not be tracked via gps when you are in company equipment conducting company business.
     
  8. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    LOL. No problem. However, that was probably on of the most expensive "eight balls" you ever bought.
     
  9. klein

    klein Für Meno :)

    See the fact is, it's not unconstitutional to follow a suspect for 28 days without a warrant.
    But the fact they touched private property to place that GPS tracker on the vehicle itself.

    This new fact might prevent cops from being able to track suspects via Cell phone GPS, too.
    Which would be a major setback for searching the missing or suspecting criminals.

    As a law abiden citizen, I personal do approve GPS tracking by law enforcement, but on the other hand it's another piece of freedom we could all lose.
    But, I think we lost that fight with cams everywhere, anyways, which should also be unconstitutional that police have access to any privately owned cam (such as 7/11 stores, buisness bulidings, etc) that tape outside of their businesses.
     
  10. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

  11. klein

    klein Für Meno :)

  12. brownmonster

    brownmonster Man of Great Wisdom

    Are we talking about the same GPS that beeps at me when I'm at the correct stop? Real reliable.