Compressors, Petcocks and Workshop Conditions

Discussion in 'Life After Brown' started by scratch, May 22, 2009.

  1. scratch

    scratch Least Best Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    That old saying "you get what you pay for" is certainly true with air tools. I'm a cheapskate and have wasted money on the cheap stuff too.

    There is a shipper I used to have years ago, his name was Howard Hurd and he modified Ingersoll Rand impact drivers for NASCAR. His son Jim inherited the business, these things are top of the line. A thousand bucks and they used to run at 200 PSI with air, although I think they run nitrogen at a lower pressure now

    http://www.constructionequipmentgui...Racing-Car-Pit-Crew--15-Seconds-of-Fame/3483/

    The two impact drivers and the one I got at Lowes were cheapies at about 30-40 bucks apiece a few years ago. They were Campbell Hausfelds. Nothing but garbage. I am currently using an Ampro model I got at Advanced Auto Parts, it was fairly cheap at $50 but has held up for rotating tires and the brake jobs I do at home. I'm pretty sure an Ingersoll Rand is the best made, but a good impact driver of any make is going to cost over a hundred bucks. I have a 4 HP/25 gallon tank Sears Craftsmen compressor I use. Its about 20 years old and I hope to replace it soon with an upright model that takes up less space.
     
  2. trplnkl

    trplnkl 555

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Chicago Pneumatic was a very good brand years ago, had an old one my Dad used. Put an overhaul kit in it and it lasted me about 15 years. I think my brother uses it now on his job. Like the Ingersol Rand, they aren't cheap. I don't use one that much anymore, but I have CH that works pretty well for the occasional.
    Really check out a compressor before you buy it, even a new sears unit. Mine is way too loud.
     
  3. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    What? I can't hear you?

    That is my reply to my wife when mine is running.
    God forbid I leave it on and it turns on in the middle of the night.
    I'm not happy then cause you-know-who is not happy.
     
  4. satellitedriver

    satellitedriver Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    I have to go outside of my shop when my Sears compressor kicks on.
    Works great, but damn it is loud.
     
  5. Dizzee

    Dizzee ɹǝqɯǝɯ ɹoıuǝs

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .


    I bought a Sears 26 gallon vertical compressor a few years ago.

    1. Assembled it. It wouldn't run. Took it back. Got another one.
    2. Assembled it. Ran, but wouldn't kick back on when pressure dropped. Took it back. Got another one.
    3. Store assembled it. Bad drain valve (cheap design). Went to store for replacement valve. None in stock. Took it back. Got another one.
    4. Store assembled it. Made sure it was right before leaving store. Accepted $100 refund from store manager.
    Bought a replacement valve, half a dozen C clips and O rings so I can switch it out fast (twice in 3 years).
     
  6. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Here's mine! (Excuse the dust)

    [​IMG]


    Bought it at Wal-Mart in 97 or 98 I think. 20 gallon, 5 hp. Made in the USA.
    I've had to replace only one part on it, the petcalk valve to drain the tank. Cost less than a buck.


    Way to go hijacking the thread!!!!
     
  7. trplnkl

    trplnkl 555

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Usually the man with the clean workshop does nothing but clean. That's my story and I'm stickin to it.
     
  8. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .


    I really like that story!
     
  9. Dagoof

    Dagoof Member

    I have an Ingersol 60 gal upright very nice will run anything. Got it for 400 bucks off a neighbor who was moving outta state and didnt want to move it. Ive had it about 2 years now the electric motor fried its $300 to replace.
     
  10. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

    Over,

    I see from your pic that you don't have a filter/regulator system. I can see the air line regulator coming off the pressure switch but you don't have a filter or a lubricator. Get you something like this setup that not only filters but can also lubricate as well. Both will insure the longevity of your system and tools. Whens the last time you changed the oil in you air pump? :surprised: Don't neglect that!

    I work and maintain both piston type and rotary screw compressors at work (I love the rotary screw, that sucker is SWEET!) and what helped the longevity of our air diverter cylinders (think of these as your tools) were the filter/lubricators and on the piston type we installed a type of pop valve on the bottom of the tank (look for a bung plug) that cycles every so often getting rid of the water build up in the tank. Try this also.

    Completely remove all air pressure from your tank and that means pulling the brass overpressure popoff valve and holding open. You also should know the pressure that the popoff works at and every so often test it. Also everytime you use the compressor, manually pull the popoff and release just to know it's at least working.

    OK, back to the tank, once all the pressure is remove from the tank (if you've never done this make sure you are outside and you might want to keep a pan handy to keep from killing the grass) open the bung plug in the bottom of the tank so all the water can run out. This water can get into your system and cause tool issues as well as making your compressor work harder than it needs too. In high humidity areas like I live, this process is a must!

    Grainger makes a sweet like check valve that plumbs into the bung plug hole of you tank that pops periodic and releases the water. It does so in a way that a small mist of water is relaesed and not a huge stream so you can have this is a basement or garage. I've got a big 7.5 HP 80 gal (almost 20 years old) vertical that was in my basement (now in my garage waiting on my slug arse to run a 220 VAC circuit :happy-very:) and it works great and we use them on our compressors at work too.

    Buying good tools is a true statement but poor compressor setup can ruin them just as quickly. Also use good tool maintence and keep tool oil handy and use a drop or so everytime you use the tool. If it's been a while add an extra drop or 2 for measure.

    Hope this helps. And if you're not sure, PM me some pics of your compressor and I'll walk ya through it. If you have a PE domiciled building, go to them and ask to see the PMI methods for air compressors. Tell them why and tell them a PE mechanic made the recommendation. If your management team will allow you access to UPS computers, go to the UPS intranet and go to Site Guide off the home page. Look for PE Homepage. Go to Maintenance and Housekeeeping and then click on either methods or it could be documents (sorry I can't remember) but somewhere in there are the PMI methods for air compressors most likely. When I get back to work on Tuesday :sad-very::happy-very: I'll find them and let you know. The UPS methods are very good and pretty straight forward and easy to follow. So easy a caveman could do it!

    :happy-very::happy-very:
     
  11. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

    Have you looked around for a motor rewinding shop who might be able to do this for less? Not as plentiful as they once were :sad-little: but some are still around. They might be able to help you out.
     
  12. dilligaf

    dilligaf IN VINO VERITAS

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Clean shop?!?!?!?!?! What the F is a clean shop? LMAO
     
  13. Big Babooba

    Big Babooba Well-Known Member

    A pet what????:surprise:
     
  14. trplnkl

    trplnkl 555

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    I'm pretty sure I wouldn't know.
     
  15. trplnkl

    trplnkl 555

    My Dad would have choked you with the air hose if you had put an auto oiler on his compressor. In a body shop that spells big trouble for painters.

    He used a U trap for water in the lines, worked really well.
     
  16. satellitedriver

    satellitedriver Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    BTW,
    I am devoting this week to clean up my shop.
    Yeah, it is that bad.
     
  17. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

    Had I seen paint equipment I would never suggest it. All I saw in his pic were and tools discussed were all non paint. But you are correct, if painting you use "no lube" and with the earlier "petcock" comment! :happy-very:

    What does a woman call her adult toy?

    :wink2:
     
  18. slantnosechevy

    slantnosechevy Active Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Love the old Craftsman box on the floor. Still have mine from the '60s. IR and CP are top shelf.
     
  19. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Thanks Wkmac!
    I will look into that sometime and I'll PM you if I have questions!
     
  20. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Re: It doesnt surprise me. . .

    Good eyes!