How to start a revolution

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by 804brown, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. 804brown

    804brown Well-Known Member

  2. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

    Professor Sharp is a fascinating individual. Of his many influences, one was the french judge and anarchist Etienne de La Boetie who questioned absolute monarchy and it's tyranny. La Boetie understood that such power only existed because the people themselves acquiesced to this illusion of power and Sharp understood from La Boetie that if people themselves understood they are the power behind the state and then withheld that power, the state would in a moment become powerless. Look at all the many ways the state has to lie to you (Plato's noble lie) or make you believe in some boogey man so it can maintain it's own illusion of relevance. Look at the many ways and areas of life that the state and hierarchy must have and maintain monopoly or else the illusion of power would be shattered into a 1000 pieces like so much cheap glass. Sharp understood this 16th century enlightened thinker and applied it to his non-violent ideas influenced by Gandhi and Thoreau. Non-violence is the hallmark trademark of the non-aggression axiom that condemns force or fraud which is the foundational seedbed on which liberty and voluntary actions are built and why such human movements must be corrupted in order to protect hierarchical power and it's illusions that control people.
     
  3. Baba gounj

    Baba gounj pensioner

    [h=1]Blurred Line Between Espionage and Truth[/h]“The Obama administration has been quite hypocritical about its promises of openness, transparency and accountability,” she said. “All presidents hate leaks, but pursuing whistle-blowers as spies is heavy-handed and beyond the scope of the law.”
    The Espionage Act, enacted back in 1917 to punish those who gave aid to our enemies, was used three times in all the prior administrations to bring cases against government officials accused of providing classified information to the media. It has been used six times since the current president took office.
    the majority of the recent prosecutions seem to have everything to do with administrative secrecy and very little to do with national security. In case after case, the Espionage Act has been deployed as a kind of ad hoc Official Secrets Act, which is not a law that has ever found traction in America, a place where the people’s right to know is viewed as superseding the government’s right to hide its business.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/27/b...ak-cases-media-equation.html?_r=3&ref=todaysp
     
  4. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

  5. 804brown

    804brown Well-Known Member

    Currently reading Wolin's Democracy Inc.

    Maybe someone could start a thread as a bookreview or a book discussion/recommendation.
     
  6. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    I recommend any of the books written by John Grisham. He has a new one called "Calico Joe" coming out in the spring about a minor league baseball player who finally gets his shot in "the show".
     
  7. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    LOL!
     
  8. 804brown

    804brown Well-Known Member

    Ok but i was thinking more on the nonfiction type.
     
  9. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    "How To Dominate an Internet Forum" by moreluck.
     
  10. moreluck

    moreluck golden ticket member

    OK, here's proof.......I didn't even have a post in this thread and you drag me in with your smart-ass comment!! Lonely day, shirley?
     
  11. wkmac

    wkmac Well-Known Member

    She got ya there hoss!