HUB Mechanics

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by feeder05, Jul 1, 2014.

  1. feeder05

    feeder05 Active Member

    In feeders I work in a out lying center. I go into a large HUB every night about 3 hours away. Had a problem with my drivers seat air cushioned ride. Took the tractor to the mechanic on duty, he looked at the problem told me since this is not "THEIR" tractor and it is not safety related he can not work on the tractor. Is it me or do we not work for the same company. Has any one else come across this problem. P.S. I came in and asked him in a polite way asking if he could take a look at the problem.
  2. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    It all has to do with which center actually has to pay for the repair.

    Resident know-it-all.
  3. Returntosender

    Returntosender Well-Known Member

    Mabye the mechanic could fix it, but the costs for the repair will come out his center automotive budget. You know UPS each operation has to stay within their budget, Automotive Rockriver can't be repairing tractors from Rockford.
  4. Indecisi0n

    Indecisi0n Well-Known Member

    Light the seat on fire then write it up when the flames go out.
    • Funny Funny x 3
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  5. Lmfao...almost spit out my beer!
  6. retiredTxfeeder

    retiredTxfeeder cap'n crunch

    Yeah, but you know what happens then. The mechanic gets the DVIR and writes "ok to run."
  7. Grieve it.
  8. Inthegame

    Inthegame Well-Known Member

    A problem with the air ride in the drivers seat sure as hell is safety related, your safety. We had a sup drive a Feeder with a f'd up air ride in from an extended center as the intelligent driver refused. Wrecked his back so bad he "retired" at 40, and now walks with a cane.
  9. Fedex Guy

    Fedex Guy Active Member

    I did spit mine out.....hysterical

    Just to be clear, I don't work for FedEx. Crazy I know.
  10. Beer abuse, rookie! Warning letter for you!
  11. Fedex Guy

    Fedex Guy Active Member

    Nothing wrong with abusing 1 sip outta a 12 pack.

    Just to be clear, I don't work for FedEx. Crazy I know.
  12. Don't you know how many people In Ethiopia, would kill for just one sip?
  13. Fedex Guy

    Fedex Guy Active Member

    They need water, not to be more dehydrated.

    Just to be clear, I don't work for FedEx. Crazy I know.
  14. greengrenades

    greengrenades To be the man, you gotta beat the man.

    I have only had minor issues, and taken it to other shops and they have gladly helped. I would imagine if it was safety then they have to do it, however if it is something that could wait they want you to just wait till you get back to your hub.
  15. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    If you're talking the air bag that supports the seat then most defineatly it's safety. If you mean the lumbar , then it's not.
    That said, if it's safety then the mechanic HAS to fix it or they need to swap you into another tractor for the trip home. It is a UPS tractor. He is a UPS mechanic. When they perform a repair they take down the tractor number for their records/timecard.
    In the future ask the mechanic courteously. If he refuses then go to dispatch and let management solve the issue. Tell them you cannot leave until it's fixed. If that fails call your management team and have them call dispatch where you're at.
    If it's a legitimate safety issue that has cropped up you can redtag the equipment regardless of where you're at.
  16. retiredTxfeeder

    retiredTxfeeder cap'n crunch

    I don't know how it is around the rest of the country, but the shops from various buildings send their parts (if they are able to be carried) via feeder drivers. If a part needs to go out to an outlying center, the shop at our hub would bring it to dispatch and set it on our counter, and tell the dispatch it needs to go to so and so center. When I punch in, dispatch asks me to take that part down to the shop at that center I'm going to later. One mechanic an hour from the hub even had my cell number, he'd give me a call an hour or so before I left for his building "hey will you swing by the shop and pick up a part I need?" I never minded doing it, and the 2 buildings I went to every night would literally jump to help me if I needed something because of it. I'd always announce "Unlimited Parts Supply!" A couple of the mechanics in my own building were not so fast to help. I'd hear a lot of "that's not my assigned tractor." or "red tag it till your mechanic can get to it." I always felt like it came out of the same big brown check book.
  17. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    Anyone who says " it's not my tractor" needs to find a new job.
  18. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    Suppose you could only work on one tractor and had two that needed immediate repairs, one from your center and the other from another. Which one would you work on?

    1BROWNWRENCH Amatuer Malthusian

    If the vehicle in question is centered outside the automotive district it is actually in, it will be impossible to charge the time or parts to it. There are limits to what we can work on without bending the rules. Though I am a PC mechanic, I frequently find myself repairing tractors when it involves something I know I can fix in a timely manner. If I can't and it's a hot load, I'm obligated to call in about it within 15 minutes to make other arrangements.
  20. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    The one from my center sitting in the shop while an out if center driver needed repair? The ooc driver gets work first.
    Two drivers, one home one ooc? The driver with the easiest repair to get him going fastest.
    Same as above, same repair? The ooc to get him down the road. Home driver can change tractors.

    The point of the topic is though, a UPS driver needed a safety level repair ( his words) and was refused work by a UPS mech because he was OOC. That is a lazy mech if the OP is telling the story correctly.
    I had this happen once and I called my mgr who in turn called the shop sup and tore him a new hole which in turn caused him to see that the repair was made.