Instructed to do something illegal

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by want to retire, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. I was instructed to move a trailer(over the road) that was out of federal inspection. The manager said UPS would cover any fines.......Really......? How about if I was involved in an accident? Say- killed someone? How about then? Bail me out of jail? Cover any lawsuits? Folks, think about all this next time you break the law for the company(speeding et all). Think about it. BTW, I refused to move the trailer.
     
  2. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Lol, I did the same maybe a month ago. After I went home, they found someone else to move the trailer.
    What happened to yours?

    PS, I told the big boss about it and he wasn't happy about it either.
     
  3. Cementups

    Cementups Box Monkey

    ^tattle tale :P
     
  4. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    No sticker, no roll.
     
  5. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Ya, you and me and the OP will say that. So they'll wait till we go home and have some brownnose do it.
     
  6. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    Good luck to the brownnose.
     
  7. UPS Lifer

    UPS Lifer Well-Known Member


    What is your understanding of who is responsible to make sure trailers without certification do not make it in the line up? I figure in your position you would know.
     
  8. Covemastah

    Covemastah Suspension Ovah !!! Tom is free FU Goodell !!

    They will put the blame on the last Feeder driver who put it on door as an empty !! Most likely the Shifter,,who will in turn blame the last driver who brought it in , then so on and so on !! THE first thing you look at when grabbing any trailer,should be the Federal Inspection sticker !
     
  9. Covemastah

    Covemastah Suspension Ovah !!! Tom is free FU Goodell !!

    Hey,, I took it ,,needed the OT !!! LOL LOL
     
  10. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    Your right, that's what they'll try. Hopefully that driver documented which dispatcher he reported the soon to be invalid sticker to when he brought it in. Or the Mgr that talked him into bringing it in with a bad one. If he did it on his own or didn't bother looking then it's on him.

    Well hopefully the driver that picked it up at the railyard made folks aware that the due date was close even though it should be in the computer when the trl number is pulled up for any movement. Spotting a trailer on the wall to be unloaded would be another time to check it but frankly at that point the only care is to get it into the bay asap, pull push or drag. When it's an empty pull would be another chance but primary pulls are just as hot as spots. The number one time to stop such a trailer is when it's backed under in preparation of a spot in a load bay. It should the first thing looked at before one even puts the hoses on.

    Now as far as responsibility. I've seen drivers fail to check stickers. Ive seen mgmt fail to check stickers. I've seen drivers bring attention to a sticker and be told to spot it anyway. The sticker that expires at midnight but "it's good enough to get it to the railyard" where the buck can be passed is always a favorite. I've seen, and been the driver, in the OP's situation where it's brought to mgmt's attention and they want me to move it. I've never had anyone take me up on my offer of putting it in writing that I was directed to move the trailer so they will sit until the next person comes along.

    I think what you were getting at and I agree is that neither side can cast any stones.
     
  11. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    So what would happen if you go through a DOT checkpoint or weigh station with an expired inspection sticker?
     
  12. TICKET. CITATION. FINE. $$$$$$. They could also impound the trailer....load and all.....could. If you killed someone with that trailer......it could(load and all) be impounded for a very long time.
     
  13. The "Big Boss" got me on the phone and said drop that trailer and report to my office.......I said ok and I said "Find me a union rep." and went out to drop the trailer. Bare in mind I was at a different hub than my home. Magically, when I returned....was told to bobtail home.
     
  14. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    Bobtail---driving just the tractor, right?
     
  15. Yep.
     
  16. cachsux

    cachsux Wah

    Funny how that solution comes up a lot.
     
  17. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    I am pretty sure it should come up much more than it does. ;)
     
  18. ajblakejr

    ajblakejr Age quod agis

    This week was the annual heavy CSA enforcement / inspection week.
    Caught without a sticker, can you say blemish on your DMV record and a zit on UPS CSA score.

    My advice is to refuse the trailer.
    It is your right as a TT driver.
     
  19. UPS Lifer

    UPS Lifer Well-Known Member

    I asked the question of "who is responsible?" because I have a hazy recollection of the process. I actually used to audit this during compliance assessments. My hazy recollection is that the responsibility goes to the last driver or shifter or hub supervisor who dealt with the trailer. As soon as there is one package in the trailer during the hub operation, the responsibility shifts to the hub. The supervisor is supposed to check the road worthiness of the trailer prior to loading. But a driver or shifter should check it before putting it in the line up.
     
  20. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    All comes down to the shifter or driver who put the trailer on a loading door for expired Feds and reg's. No-one, shifter or hub sup, checks for anything else. Anything else wrong with the trailer should have been reported by the driver that inbounded with it.