Misload grievance

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by jacobram, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. Hey guys I'm a preloader who just got a suspension letter for misloads while i recieved help and was wondering what to put for the what happened/settlement requested part of the form. Thanks!
     
  2. sailfish

    sailfish Having way too much fun.

    Suspended on the first offense for misloads?
     
  3. Turdferguson

    Turdferguson Guest

    Have you gotten a verbal warning and warning letters for this before for this.
     
  4. Yeah last time my steward told me what to put, he normally leaves early so I want it ready when to give him when I get there
     
  5. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    How many misloads did you have and in what period of time? Do you normally have misloads? Just wondering for future reference that I hopefully won't need, I had 3 yesterday and my sup made me sign some kind of paper or whatever, oh well yesterday was a bad day, it happens. I didn't have the least but I didn't have the most so that's a plus.
     
  6. Brownslave688

    Brownslave688 You want a toe? I can get you a toe.

    For future reference RTS those sheets of paper.
     
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  7. HBGPreloader

    HBGPreloader Active Member

    Wow, suspension for misloads? If that were the case, I would have been fired years ago.
    It sounds like you need to get a better steward.
    As brownslave noted, don't sign anything your supervisor tells you to. When he asks to initialize RTS (refused to sign) I politely say no thanks.
    If they even attempt to hassle me about refusing to it, I point out that the current contract states that they're now harassing me and pushing for a harassment grievance. Just don't ask me where it's noted in the new contract though :)
     
  8. No way they suspended you for misloads one time. There has to be a history.
     
  9. KaiserTom

    KaiserTom Member

    That really depends, in my area they are being extremely anal about any and all misloads lately for reasons I'm not entirely sure of, calling it a period of "disciplinary action" for misloads, though luckily my sup gave me a verbal there are others in my building not so lucky (I have extensive periods of no misses so I got lucky),

    Also on that note, check your surepost bags, even if they are rushing you out. There is nothing worse than getting 10 misloads, 10% of the entire building that day, because you got the wrong bag in the wrong truck.
     
  10. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    I would but I'm not done with my probationary period. My steward happens to be like my 2nd dad so he's able to help get me out of most of the heat I get into, typically I just think of an excuse like a sup threw the misload behind the truck or one of the other co-workers helped load my truck, lol. But on a serious note once I get past the probationary period and all of that junk I'll always RTS, that's what my steward told me to do.
     
  11. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    This morning my whole building had more misloads than usual, my sup kicked over a trash can and threw a clip board. Lol
     
  12. oldngray

    oldngray nowhere special

    Is that where Bobby Knight went to?
     
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  13. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    Who's that? A co-worker at your center? Lol
     
  14. oldngray

    oldngray nowhere special

     
  15. Box Ox

    Box Ox Camacho for President!

    In the future, on every misload sheet you're told to sign, make sure the routes listed are the ones you actually loaded (sups can/do screw that up). And if anyone helped you - sup, driver or fellow PT hourly, write down who it was, how long they helped you (if you can remember), and any other info that helps prove that pinning the misload on you as definitely yours is ridiculous. And then sign "Under Protest" at a minimum. If a sup insists on making his/her productivity numbers by burying you butt deep, there's nothing you can do about it and you shouldn't pay the price for it when help comes and makes mistakes.

    But I have seen loaders who've poured in misloads regularly like they were on drugs or something during the sort. If you're on of those there's no hope.
     
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  16. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    lol I see the resemblance...:)
     
  17. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    Maybe better not to right the time down, the PAL label tells time it was scanned while being unloaded and it generally takes it 5 minutes to make it down the belt (in my center) and writing a time down could screw you over unless of course it had been stacked behind the truck for a good period of time.
     
  18. Box Ox

    Box Ox Camacho for President!

    Yeah, typically at my center help arrives when you've been stacked out for a while and are still getting blasted. And small stuff is often toted after being PAL'd and sent down only when it's full and/or there's a break in the box action. And any amount of time would be enough to make a case for any misloads at a 200-250/hr load rate. But I see your point. Probably easier just to skip the time spent unless it was a ridiculously long period.
     
  19. HardknocksUPSer

    HardknocksUPSer Well-Known Member

    Deffinately, I have a problem with co-workers throwing things anywhere in my truck because I'm at the end of the belt, they always give the guys towards the head of the belt help first and I'm always last to get helped, in the event I'm stacked out and need help people generally throw it anywhere in my trucks because sups are yelling at us to get off the clock and therefore I end up with misloads and :censored2: off drivers, I've had up to 6 people helping load my trucks at the end of the sort..
     
  20. HBGPreloader

    HBGPreloader Active Member

    Well, ideally, you want to avoid the misloads completely. But, we are only human.
    If you get help, make sure management is aware of that because you can not be blamed for others mistakes.
    So, until you make seniority, slow down a bit and pay closer attention to the labels.
    What has worked for me is writing both the car number and pal number on the box - just before placing it on the shelf.
    Also, management encourages carrying more than one package at a time. So, if you do, make sure they're for the same car. Don't grab packages for car 8 and 9 and bring them both into 8. Instead, leave the package for 9 and make a second trip.
    Another "solution" management has encouraged in the past is reading the label out-loud as you enter into the car.
    These tips work even better if the car number is posted somewhere obvious inside the car.
    Finally, if management is distracting ...err... talking to you, stop what you're doing until the conversation is finished.