Discussion in 'FedEx Discussions' started by Purplepackage, Jul 9, 2015.

  1. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    We have an FO driver at my station (that's his hired position). Only hired in December and now we are in the midst of vacation/injury season and we are short staffed. At least 2 or 3 times a week he is covering full routes, at what point do they have to offer him a swing spot? Never? He's doing a swings job for at least 2 dollars less in pay and just letting them take advantage of him.

    I'm assuming there's no rule on it since the company can abuse you anyway they want but I was just wondering
  2. dezguy

    dezguy Well-Known Member

    I have been told that if you are consistently working 35 hours (full time), you can go to your manager and request that that route become a full time route. The manager can either A.) ignore you. B.) Put in a request to have engineering look into whether another full time route is needed.

    Expect option A. Even if option B is pursued, it would be an utter miracle if engineering decided another ft route was warranted. Still worth a shot though.

    Edit: The route would still have to be posted in JCA though and if you don't have a lot of seniority, you risk the chance of losing that route should someone else take it.
  3. 59 Dano

    59 Dano Well-Known Member

    They don't have to offer him anything and he can turn down some of the additional hours if he chooses. The advantage to him is that he's getting extra hours (assuming he wants them) and he's learning other routes. Some stations bid out swing routes just like any other routes (CEV scores) but some bid them out based on the number of routes the courier is experienced at running. If the swing routes at your station are bid out with the latter procedure, his extra work gives him a better shot at getting a swing position.
  4. overflowed

    overflowed Well-Known Member

    These guys do this willingly. I try to tell them if they work 60 hours a week part time might as well go full time.