Piece rate for pre-loaders

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by Dr Greg, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. Dr Greg

    Dr Greg New Member

    Does anyone know what UPS says is the standard for piece rate work for a pre-loader? A few months ago I think I heard the driver supervisor say that a rate of 250/hour is expected at an end bar position. What is the rate in the middle of the belt position?
     
  2. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    There is none. Not according to the contract UPS made with the teamsters. Now, if you are a RTW'er, I've heard it's 400.




    :winks:
     
  3. Justaname

    Justaname Member

    Doesn't that number change higher every week? Just do your best, that's all that can be asked.
     
  4. ORLY!?!

    ORLY!?! Master Loader

    The suggested rate asked is 270 the first hour, 210 the rest of the night. But, that isnt in the contract and shouldnt be apart of any harassment or punishment. Thusly, if one is of the latter can file grievance.
     
  5. TechGrrl

    TechGrrl Space Cadet

    The technical answer is, it depends. The IE analysis of preloading has a lot of variables. Unfortunately, the quality of IE work is so shoddy in today's company, that I doubt your preload has been updated in the last 5 years.

    From a union standpoint, there is no contractual recognition of IE standards. If your supervisor is riding you about production, the best approach is to ask them to demonstrate what you are doing wrong, and try your best to deal. There are a lot of things that YOU can't control that can blow your production to hell, and that's why the obligation is on the supervisor to demonstrate what you are doing wrong.

    Preloading is a hard job. Even with the new technology, it's tough.
     
  6. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    I was just being smart, Greg. There is no number. Do your best and follow the methods.
     
  7. Dr Greg

    Dr Greg New Member

    I was pretty sure with a number like 400 you were either one of my supervisors or just kidding. The joke in my center is that if you just follow your methods, you won't have any stack out, no misloads and you won't miss any packages. So I find humor in "Do your best and follow the methods."!

    And TechGirl, what is IE?
     
  8. TechGrrl

    TechGrrl Space Cadet

    Industrial Engineering, the efficiency experts that set up the work processes and analyze what the productivity pieces per hour should be for all the jobs. In manufacturing factories, statistical process control is used to set up quality and productivity metrics. At UPS, the inside jobs like hub and preload, have similar analyses done, by the IE department.

    However, it has been my observation (somewhat at second hand since I retired 5 years ago) that the IE function at UPS has taken a drastic downhill slide in recent years, and is more dependent on computer spreadsheets than on actually going into the operation to observe and make recommendations while working with the actual, you know, operators.
     
  9. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    I preloaded for a decent share of 11 years. PPH always changes, depending on what amount UPS thinks they can "force production" from employees. When I started in 01 it was something like 200/hr (belt to car), then 215/hr, then PAS came in and it was 230/hr. The last I heard it was 223/hr in our hub, boxline preload.
     
  10. laffter

    laffter Active Member

    Just to add some information to the conversation, in my center the magical number is 220. Because of volume in my area, I used to get as low as 150-170 earlier this year. Those were sweet times. Now it's about 230 for me.
     
  11. Random_Facts

    Random_Facts Member

    Where can I sign up for 220 boxes per hour? If I truly got that, I would actually enjoy going into work each day. Haha. (actually I'm starting to like it again, believe it or not Christmas is when I pull the least amount of stuff). The 11 other months of the year, I average about 300-350 an hour. On a good day!
     
  12. Macbrother

    Macbrother Member

    At our hub it's 300 PPH for the back of the belt, 250 for the middle, and 150-195 for the sorters at the top of the belt. DrGreg, we have the same joke at our hub, the "follow your methods and you'll never stack out again," a sup actually told me that with a straight face.
     
  13. laffter

    laffter Active Member

    I'm talking about package car loaders. Is that what you guys are talking about?
     
  14. Dr Greg

    Dr Greg New Member

    Yes, I am talking about package car loaders.
     
  15. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    There is no "stacking out" unless you stack out. Leave 'em in the cage, let them go down the belt. If they instruct you to stack, you can say no.
     
  16. Macbrother

    Macbrother Member

    So I should place the burden on the guy behind me? Or on the loader in the back who has to cart everything missed back to me?
     
  17. laffter

    laffter Active Member

    How can a person load 300 packages per hour into 3+ package cars and do a decent job at it? Does quality even matter at that point?

    Today I had 950 pieces, three cars. Start time was 4:20 and I clocked out at 8:55. I consider it a mild day.
     
  18. TechGrrl

    TechGrrl Space Cadet

    You must work on a boxline; most buildings, it's a straight line belt. You miss a package, it goes all the way down to the end and has to be hauled physically to the head of the belt again. I am flashing back to 1974 when I was a boxline sorter...(shudder)
     
  19. packageguy

    packageguy Well-Known Member

    Your sounding like a supervisor...............lol
     
  20. Dr Greg

    Dr Greg New Member

    How can a person load 300 packages per hour into 3+ package cars and do a decent job at it? Does quality even matter at that point?

    Today I had 950 pieces, three cars. Start time was 4:20 and I clocked out at 8:55. I consider it a mild day.

    I hear you, Laffter. Today I had about 1020 in three trucks. Start time was 4:30 and I clocked out at 8:30. I did not have the opportunity to take a break when it was time to break. I am glad it is Friday so I can recover!