PT Air Driver Opening

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by nystripe96, Jan 17, 2012.

  1. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    My supe is pushing me to get on the air driver list. A few guys I've worked with said they got put through to part time airs within 2 years, just don't expect to put in a lot of hours. I work in a large Hub, so hopefully there will be openings soon. I have truck driving experience, but very little, & only on automatic when I went for the license last year. What's the best reasonably priced, yet thorough alternative to getting the proper amount of prep time in if a position opens up
     
  2. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    There isn't any prep. It's more of a 'just do it'. It is a way to get more hours. It is excellent practice for FT/casual driving. It enables you to practice the diad without too much pressure.
     
  3. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    :grouphug:
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  4. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    Thanks meno. I just need to learn how to drive stick first, my only concern cuz I really wanna do it
     
  5. hondo

    hondo promoted to mediocrity

    • change shifts to work as a preloader
    • work as a driver helper during Peak season
    • get on as a Saturday air driver until a regular air driver job opens up.
    Make sure you understand the Hours of Service regulations with respect to your ability to work a second job!
    Have you looked at the air driver seniority list/day off schedule in your building? How many are there, how long have they been air drivers, do you ever see their names on FT driver bid lists? Around here, there isn't too much turn over in these jobs.
    1. some people are content with their earnings/benefits as a PT air driver
    2. some people are working as an air driver as half of their 22.3 job
    3. some people look at how much more work a FT pkg driver does (depending on how you quantify it, some would say 4 or 5 times more), for about only 25% higher wage rate. They say, No Way!
    4. that usually only leaves 1 or 2 people at the bottom ofthe list using PT air driver as a 'stepping stone' to FT package

    Having worked in a couple of Hubs, it's been my observation that PT air drivers work less hours, unless they are making side deals with management. Unless you are referring to Exception air drivers, who might sometimes brown up after working preload.
    I'm talking about regular air drivers. They are scheduled to drive 5 days a week (3 hours daily guarantee) as air drivers.
    I know of PT air drivers who have been cut back to just 15hrs/week.
     
  6. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    I was an exception air driver. I averaged 50 hrs a week. I think they liked me.
     
  7. hondo

    hondo promoted to mediocrity

    If a manual trans is the required road test in your building, there's no way around it. Doesn't matter what someone in some other center in some other part of the country says, about only having automatics in their building. Ask your supe if s/he (or some other person in the building) can teach you on the property after your shift, or on a Saturday.
    I have seen an air driver have to take an old high step, manual steering, manual trans truck out on a pickup route when 1 or more of the smaller air vans (automatic, power steering) was in the shop.
     
  8. hondo

    hondo promoted to mediocrity

    But not enough to make it a full time (Article 22.3 'combo') job? Or FT air driver; or PT air driver (shuttle), and PT air driver (AM delivery)? Hmmm....
    Oh, nevermind.
     
  9. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    I love the twilight shift. I would rather not work the preload if I could avoid it.
     
  10. ORLY!?!

    ORLY!?! Master Loader

    Stick is on its way out. UPS is trying to make it possible for any jackhole to do the job. I'd say its gone in the next 3 - 4 years, everywhere.
     
  11. ORLY!?!

    ORLY!?! Master Loader

    Preload and load, worst jobs ever. I probably max out around 8 1/2 to 10 miles a night working preload. That might not seem like a lot, but you are also carrying random weights, walking on uneven and hard surfaces and putting up with soups that couldnt do the job right to begin with.

    Hope it turns out alright for you.
     
  12. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    Or so I've heard. I'm stayin with my shift, at least for a while
     
  13. hondo

    hondo promoted to mediocrity

    No problem, I understand. As a general piece of advice for any fellow PT UPS Teamster, the best shift is the one they can get to everyday, on time; just keep climbing that seniority list.
    However, having worked Twilight many years myself, it is a struggle to retrain myself to look at the parts of the delivery address or PAL & service level code & the other accessorial add-ons a driver (or preloader) needs to.
    And as far as working as an Exception air driver, I strongly suspect that is only going to happen for someone working on the preload shift. Between Hours of Service regulations and call-in/commute time, I don't see it happening for a Twilight employee.

    Saturday air driver is probably the best suggestion I have for you, but remember:
    • Hours of Service restrictions. You need to know what time the Saturday air unload/sort starts, and what the commit times are in your area (does the co. offer EAM service in your area on Saturday, what is the regular Saturday commit time?). And if the Saturday air dept and your twilight hub mgmnt can accomodate your restrictions
    • Are you going to be able/required to work every Saturday?
    • Do they use PAS/EDD for Saturday, or is it up to each driver to load & map out the run with his/her area knowledge?
    • Do you have enough hours left if you work any other job during the week?
     
  14. air_dr

    air_dr Member

    Hondo has given you excellent advice above and I speak as one who is an air driver. I only question, though not necessarily disagree with the value of moving to preload. I would need more information on the particular situation in your hub to make that call. I would encourage you to look into it more carefully.

    As far as learning stick, what I did was first get some practice driving various package cars around the UPS yard on Saturdays. The supervisor of the Sat operation at the time was most gracious in giving me this opportunity because he did not have to. Once I became confident enough of my skill driving around the yard, I rented a 26 foot U-Haul truck that had a stick early one Saturday. Parentetically, FYI, there is a difference in the type of driver's license required to drive certain vehicles for hire commercially versus for private use. the regular license I already had was all I needed to be able to rent the U-Haul for myself, whereas if I was driving that very same vehicle or even one far smaller for UPS, then the upgraded license is required. Initially, I soulght to avoid traffic in the U-Haul, then as my skill and confidence further improved, I went onto busy streets and even an expway. I had the truck for 48 hours, I believe, and it cost me $300 between the basic rental charge and miles I put in. I passed the road test for the upgraded license in a UPS truck with a UPS supervisor administering it on the first try. The money I put into that rental truck has been one of the best investments I have made in my life. That is my story.

    Now I have a question for you: Your user name suggests you are from the Empire State. There were a number of threads right about a year ago discussing the lay off of air drivers in NYC, and basically the elimination of air routes, so I find you being encouraged to sign up for air driving most interesting... Has anything changed in the company strategy, or what is going on, does anyone know? I ask this question with great interest because I believe UPS copies successful innovations in other parts of the system, so that may have implications for my future as an air driver.
     
  15. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    Thanks guys for the insight. I will definitely heed the advise :)
     
  16. nystripe96

    nystripe96 Active Member

    "Now I have a question for you: Your user name suggests you are from the Empire State. There were a number of threads right about a year ago discussing the lay off of air drivers in NYC, and basically the elimination of air routes, so I find you being encouraged to sign up for air driving most interesting... Has anything changed in the company strategy, or what is going on, does anyone know? I ask this question with great interest because I believe UPS copies successful innovations in other parts of the system, so that may have implications for my future as an air driver".

    I have not heard anything about this. My supe is pushing me to go for the position because he knows I want to become a driver. I will definitely talk to the guys on my belt, and others as well about it
     
  17. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    The value of being a preloader is the exception air driver work is Extra work for a preloader.