Question

Discussion in 'The Archives' started by upslocal480, Oct 9, 2002.

  1. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    There is a factory in our town that makes magazines. Usually a package car driver will go there and pick up a truck full of them and then we unload them on the reload shift. Sometimes there will be 5-12 skids and if so our feeder driver will go pick them up and either bring them to our center for us to unload (which we aren't equipped to do) or he'll take it straight to the hub. When the load is taken directly to the hub...who gets credit for the profits from the load? Our center or the hub? Anyone know the answer?
     
  2. thedrooler

    thedrooler Guest

    The center gets credit for the revenue.

    Drooler
     
  3. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    So when they send it to the hub instead our center IS NOT losing credit for the profits? That would mean that when they make us unload it here that they are just trying to get the extra scans right?
     
  4. coolhand

    coolhand Guest

    480- Is there a big differance in the amount of volume when the load is sent straight to the hub?? I know in our center( small extended) that we have an account whom ships out flower bulbs & another that ships t-shirts & shorts for the armed forces. Alot of the time there maybe 200- 300 boxs & to save having to off load them in a 1 belt center the trailer is just sent to the hub & all scanning is taken care of there. Just a thought I know it saves our p.m. crew alot of pain in the neck..Be Well...CoolHand
     
  5. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    On average there is not a huge difference. With the exception of last night that is. Its usually 4 or 5 skids which is usually about 500 or so small 25 pound boxes. Our bulding is just a one belt center and just to be able to unload a trailer on our shift we have to set up some portable rollers that are not capable of being secured in place. Its very dangerous. The trailer HAS to be a flatbed and can't be a pup. They say that by unloading the thing here that it creates jobs. That is BS because no jobs have ever been created here by doing so and the supposed extra profits made by doing it here doesn't seem to improve our unsafe working conditions we have here.
     
  6. tieguy

    tieguy Guest

    500 packages processed on your local sort equates to just about one person worked. It won't get you a state of the art extendo to unload it with but it will get you one more person.
     
  7. thedrooler

    thedrooler Guest

    A large volume account is moved to a hub for processing in order to reduce the number of "handles" for the packages. The fewer the "handles", the lower the cost to process each package. The cost to transport the packages to the hub is factored in, and a decision is made whether to bring them to the hub or the extended center for processing.

    Drooler
     
  8. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    Tieguy....we have yet to get one more person as a result of unloading that trailer.
     
  9. tieguy

    tieguy Guest

    You telling me your local sort plans to work the same number of people each day regardless of the volume?
     
  10. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    Been doing it since it opened.
     
  11. upsdawg

    upsdawg Guest

    My undrstanding is whether or not it is processed by the hub or center---whatever the SLIC number is assigned to the shipper in CRIS is who will get credit for the volume/reveune. It may be less costly for our hub to process because of less handles, but ultimately the volume/revenue would be credited to the SLIC number assigned to that shipper number.
     
  12. upscorpis

    upscorpis Guest

    The center gets credit for the revenue for sure, just as stated by upsdawg. The load could go directly to the hub for a number of reasons. It could be the distribution of the packages in the load is known to be abnormally targeted to one area and would blow out one of your local sort splits. It could be that the hub needs the trailer because they're out of balance. It could be the hub needs your feeder driver to do a couple of local runs to/from the hub or shifting, planned or unplanned. It could be a combo of all of those things. That's what comes to mind off the top of my head.
     
  13. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    I asked one of our managers during and arguement about it and they said that our center loses money if the load is taken to the hub instead. My complaint was that we are not properly or safely equipped to unload a trailer on our shift. Its not as bad when its 4 or 5 skids but they are trying to get us to unload 16 skids lately. Our center is just a tiny rectangular building with 3 unload doors at one end. There is one belt running down the middle of the building from one end to the other. The belt gives way to metal rollers that go into an added wing. The belt starts directly in front of one of the unload doors and connects to another seperate belt that run along the other two doors. We just turn the middle belt on backwards and load the one trailer that way and back another one in like its a package car and load it that way. In order to unload those skids of magazines we have to bring out those ladder looking portable rollers that don't even connect to each other and set them up on jacks. They are all bent up and warped and fall allot. Sometimes we have to use the skids that have already been unloaded to help keeps those rollers from falling. Its very dangerous but all they care about is the volume.
     
  14. upscorpis

    upscorpis Guest

    The loss to the local sort is the volume. That hurts production numbers for sure, especially in light of what you said earlier about not adjusting the staffing due to lighter volume. Lower volume + same number of hours = lower pph It would not surprise me that there would be pressure to keep the load on the local sort to keep production numbers up. I've seen feeders unloaded in the setup you've described often. With a good set of rollers, it should work acceptably and safely. I readily admit it's not the optimal way to unload but it can be effective if the equipment is in good shape.

    Although it doesn't sound as if your relationship with your your sort manager is exactly rosey, you might ask for a new set of rollers in the name of safety. You could also help sell the idea by stating that the unloading would become more productive with a set of rollers that would stand up reliably since less time would be spent tending to the rollers. It sounds like production numbers are at the heart of this so that could appeal to him/her. Another selling point would be reduced damages and breakopens caused by the rollers falling. I know it's not always easy but focusing on the positives is the way to make things happen.
     
  15. thedrooler

    thedrooler Guest

    When the volume goes down the staffing can remain the same with no loss in productivity if there is a reduction in the paid day. This can be accomplished by starting later, finishing earlier, staggering start and finish times, etc. It is also important to maintain an optimum flow per hour through your facility, one that allows for the flow to be "pulled" through the building rather than "pushed" through. This facilitates the safety of the people and the packages.

    Drooler
     
  16. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    We have been pushing for new equipment for over a year now. The portable rollers are all bent and warped. There are also some rollers missing like in the trailers. We've taken pictures of the situation many times and you'd think that after seeing pictures of many boxes rolling off the side of the rollers and ripping open and damaging the magazines would at least get them to consider getting new rollers. It hasn't. We even took pictures of the mess that was created after the rollers collapsed many times and almost landed on us. No matter how many skids there are on that trailer it takes 10 times longer to unload it compared to a place that has the proper equipment. It should take 30-40 minutes to unload a 16 skid trailer at a hub but takes an hour here. Then they bitch about productivity. Even the rollers we use to unload the vans are messed up. One set is warped and the other set sends packages back towards you because once you have them pulled all the way into the van it dips down towards the floor. I almost broke my finger the other night as a result of that set. We have "safety meetings" but they are a waste of breath and time because NOTHING is ever done about the things we mention. We have been mentioning the same things for over a year and that's sad.
     
  17. upscorpis

    upscorpis Guest

    You're right, that is sad. What are you doing with the pictures? It's tough to know if the local management is doing the best thing with this volume without more info. If what you're saying is true, it sure doesn't seem they don't have the big picture. How long is your typical sort? How many employees? How much volume is a typical night? Do you encounter "slow" times during your sort? With this info, I can analyze more closely your situation and perhaps give you some insight into the production picture.

    Drooler, I agree with what you're asserting. I probably assumed too quickly that there are other factors reducing utilization. With the questions above answered, we'll soon see.
     
  18. upslocal480

    upslocal480 Guest

    Our typical sort is 2.5-3 hours except during peak. We only load two trailers and one package car gets 90% of the next day airs. It has to be loaded by 8:15 to be shutled to a local mall where the driver meets a feeder from another center and they transfer all of our air to the feeder which goes to Louisville. One of the two trailers we load has to be pulled at 9:15. So we have to get all the air off the vans and loaded to be shuttled before 8:15 and then whats left needs to be done before 9:15. When we unload a flatbed full of skids not only is it dangerous but it can really press us for time because of the way our sort is set up with those that trailer and shuttle run. We have 9 people on our shift (unloader, splitter, 2 loaders, smalls, clerk, 2 car washers, clerk). We are usually one man short because one guy is a driver sometimes so we are usually stuck with 8 people. When we get the trailer of skids sometimes the customer counter guy will help unload it depeding on if he is still there or not. The smalls guy is usually pretty busy because he doesnt just do smalls. He has to sort and load the air for the shuttle run and also moves package cars in and out of the building so we can always have one to unload instead of stopping to go find one. Its kind of like a no win situation because sometimes we have enough people to unload the trailer quickly but it never really helps because we never have enough to keep up with the loading. Plus whenever two people unload it the belt starts to slip off and their are sometimes so much wieght on the belt it sputters. We end up having to stop it a bunch of times so the loaders can keep up or because the belt is comming off. One of the trailers doesn't have a belt running to it and is parked up to the dock like a package car. thats the one that gets behind so much. Add the problem of the portable rollers being warped and dangerous to all that and it is just a huge hassle.
     
  19. upscorpis

    upscorpis Guest

    Without knowing the typical volume, it's tough to tell for sure but I'm betting that without that trailer load, utlization is low. If you don't know the volume, can you tell me what percentage the outboud loads usually are from what you load into them each night? Are they pups or 48 footers?
     
  20. over9five

    over9five Guest

    "We have "safety meetings" but they are a waste of breath and time ...."

    Sad, but so true. UPS talks and talks safety, but does not actually do anything. Which is why I say anyone involved in a UPS safety committee should be ashamed.