Trying to find FE...

Discussion in 'The Archives' started by almostbrown, May 12, 2003.

  1. almostbrown

    almostbrown Guest

    I'm trying to get in touch with Bryan H. Bryan is a FE on the DC-8 and was hired in July '01. We both interviewed the same day. I'm still in the pool [​IMG]

    If anyone knows how I can get in touch with Bryan, please e-mail me at uepilot@yahoo.com.

    TIA.

    Brad K.}}
     
  2. fr8dog

    fr8dog Guest

    Brad, I gave a copy of your post to my flightcrew tonight and they will place it in his V-File when they get to sdf tonight. Hope that helps.
     
  3. almostbrown

    almostbrown Guest

    Great! Thanks very much.

    bk
     
  4. feederdryver

    feederdryver Guest

    Hey I'm thinking about taking flight lessons. How many hours must I log to get my commercial license?
    I can be the first UPSer to go from part-time loader, to full time Feeders, to full-time Pilot.
    I wonder if I can carry my seniority over and bump one of the pilots off his plane...hahahaha

    Just a thought.

    wheeeeeeee
     
  5. mountaingoat

    mountaingoat Guest

    feederdryver: Go for it, but it ain't cheap and UPS is probably not going to pick up the tab (Unfortunately [​IMG])

    Figure this:
    You'll need to have your private pilot's license. At a FAR141 school, that's a MINIMUM of 35 hours. Most pilots complete the private pilot license in about 50 hours. This will cost you roughly $5000. That means that you're qualified to fly a private single-engine airplane less than 200hp, basically a Cessna or Piper. Then you'll need a commercial license, which is another 150 hours. Probably another $15K. Now you can fly passengers for a fee in a single-engine plane < 200lbs. Next, you'll need multi-engine, which is about twice as expensive as single-engine (Gee, any coincidence?). At this point, you can fly passengers for pay in a single-engine or multi-engine but only in VFR conditions (Visual Flight Rules). You still have to get an instrument rating so that you can fly IFR (Instrument Flight Rules). Then you need jet flight training. Figure the cost up to this point to be somewhere around $80-$100K.

    Now you're set, right? Technically, yes. You have all your ratings, your endorsements, but you still lack flight hours. Yes, you need thousands of hours before you're a virtual shoe-in for an ATP.

    Hopefully, I didn't kill your enthusiasm. Go for the private pilot and you can at least fly you, your family, friends, AND your packages around. Over time, you can always step-up to additional ratings. Personally, I think that I'll stop at an IFR rating with a complex endorsement, but I'm only 36, so I have time to get into other aircraft types.
     
  6. dannyboy

    dannyboy Guest

    hehehe, and that is without the cost of an airplane. For that you can figure 60-250 grand or more. And then there is the upkeep. So it aint cheap. Been playing round with the idea myself, just no time or $$.

    d
     
  7. abuckover

    abuckover Guest

    Does UPS require an ATP or is commercial with multi/IFR enough to get your foot in the door?
     
  8. mountaingoat

    mountaingoat Guest

    I don't hire the pilots, so I have no idea, but I would guess that an ATP is necessary.

    dannyboy -- you're right about airplane ownership. It's not cheap. I rent right now, but there is a purchase in my future. I would like to get a Piper Archer but even a mid-80's Archer with 2k hours still runs about $80k. Then there's the tie-down or hanger fees, insurance, annual inspection, etc. Let's hope the stock keeps going up.