West coast drivers see if you can answer this question

Discussion in 'UPS Union Issues' started by SWORDFISH, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    I dont think anyone could answer this unless they are on the west coast because as I was watching in another post its different everywhere. Heres the scenario, when you go full time from part time as far as vacations go you get 1 year of ft credit for every 2 years of part time credit. So if you were part time for 4 years you would get 2 years of full time credit. How would it work if you had an odd number like 5? I have never been able to find a person that can answer this question. I personally think you should be able to set your vacation pick day back half a year to get credit for the odd year. So say your driver day is june 1 1999 then it should become jan 1 1999. Anyone know anything?
     
  2. chopstic

    chopstic New Member

    I too would like to know this as I hope to go FT sometime. I hope all these years of PT service are counted for something.
     
  3. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    You get to trade in your years 2 for 1 but the odd year is the one Im concerned about.
     
  4. Kingofallshipping

    Kingofallshipping New Member

    I'll let you know what happened to me. Started p/t August 7th, 2006. Started f/t March 3rd, 2008. They adjusted my date for entitlements to May 21st. My adjusted date will put me at 3 years of f/t seniority on the 21st of May. Don't know if that helps you but thats my scenario.
     
  5. brownrod

    brownrod Active Member

    I'm in the NW and I don't even understand your question.

    My number of vacation weeks is dependent on my pt hire date. My vacation selection date is my FT hire date...
     
  6. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member

    That is an easy one:

    started pt 9/7/89 (hire date)
    went ft 1/30/96

    you can figure it to the day, this is just for simplicity.
    6 years 4 months pt = 3 years 2 months full time credit

    1/30/96 + the 3 years 4 moth credit = full time hire date of 10/92
    So 2012 would be the 20th full time year to get that 6th week vacation.
     
  7. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    When do your vacations renew in your scenario?
     
  8. Coldworld

    Coldworld Well-Known Member

    1989, is the part time credit also applied to the western pension?? I worked many years in part time like you, but most of my part time years had massive doubleshifting and driving mixed in, so are those part time years with working over 40 hours counted as one full time pension credit?? Part time years seem to be a gray area for pension credit...everyone seems to have a different idea.
     
  9. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member


    I am pretty sure there is a cap of hours for pt pension just as there is a cap for full time (2080). So if you worked 2100 hours as a pt person you would only get credit and contributions for the pt max. You can get a work history from the pension trust which will show all the credit hours by year. My guess is the cap on pt years is 1040 hours (half of the full time cap) Although I show one pt year with 1150.9 hours credited.

    The pension trust do make mistakes...In 2006 they showed I only worked 746 hours during 4 months of the year. Jan, Mar, Apr, Dec. The sooner you can correct the mistakes the better.
     
  10. Kingofallshipping

    Kingofallshipping New Member


    In my scenario, my vacations are given on May 21st.
     
  11. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member

    Vacations renew on the actual ft hire date of 1/96. Your mgmt should have the date they consider your ft benefit day. (don't know what they call this day) This date is really only needed to figure out the amount of vacation weeks you get.
     
  12. Coldworld

    Coldworld Well-Known Member

    I thought i have read in the contract that it is up to 2080 regardless of pt or full time. I will have to call western conf. pension to verify this. So, the part time years count as a year, but you would just not get as much as full time for 30 years...Ive also heard that 2 part time pension contribution years = 1 full time.
     
  13. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member


    I don't think it matters peer 80 is peer 80 regardless if it a pt year or a ft year. You get credit for hours worked only. Part timers just get less contributions per hour. In the end your benefit is based on dollar amount of the contributions on your behalf.
     
  14. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    Correct. Thats why UPS cuts routes and we work lots of overtime. Saves UPS money. We figure in about OCT. every year our pension hours are maxed.
     
  15. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    Thats what I need to have them do. Who would I talk to? I have known it was screwed up for years and no one has been able to help me. Going into my 13th year LOL
     
  16. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    I dont believe that is correct but thats what was done w/ mine as well.
     
  17. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    Im not sure on the part time langauge, but the full time langauge is correct and if you go part time to full time your years get traded 2 for 1 just like vacations.
     
  18. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member


    Which part do you think is incorrect? You don't think it is done this way, or you don't think it should be done this way?
     
  19. SWORDFISH

    SWORDFISH New Member

    I think that way is incorrect. For instance I have 5 part time years yet I get credit for 4 of them. My driver date should be adjusted back 6 months to make up for that extra year. So instead of renewing my vacations in Sept. it should be march. I need to get it fixed. I have been losing out way to long.
     
  20. 1989

    1989 Well-Known Member

    Your driver date is the day you went diving (for purposes of center seniority, vacation sign up) If you move that back you would move up the seniority list. Your ft entitlement date should move back 2 years 6 months. Your pt entitlements should have been cashed out when you went driving so your driving date is also your center seniority date.