Working after UPS. What do you do?

Discussion in 'UPS Retirement Topics' started by brown67, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. brown67

    brown67 Active Member

    I'm still about 12 years away from retirement, but starting to think about life after UPS. I have 22 years with UPS and right now I'm a package/feeder driver. Should be in feeders in a few months after a retirement of one of our 3 feeder drivers. I'm curious what type of jobs if any you are working during retirement. Are you doing driving related jobs or something totally different?
     
  2. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    The ideal would be to have your finances as such to where you won't need to work.
     
  3. brown67

    brown67 Active Member

    I want to retire at 57 and don't want to stop working. Want to do something part-time to stay busy. When my dad retired his doctor told him to find something to do. The stats on how many men die shortly after they retire is quite high. I can't remember the number, but I remember being shocked at how many men die the first year after they retire. This is about money, but about health and enjoyment.
     
  4. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    You're right---you should not just simply stop doing anything as the chances of dying earlier increase with non-activity.

    Your pension plan may have limitations on the number of hours that you can work while collecting a pension. This is usually for work within the same trade.

    I like working with numbers and plan on working for a tax preparation firm during their Peak season. Beyond that, I plan on working on my golf game.
     
  5. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    I am a photographer on the side and I already have a business set up for when I retire next year.
     
  6. rod

    rod retired and happy

    Call me Forrest Gump----I mow grass for my local township (park-cemetery- town hall ). Its the perfect job because I do it when I want to and they pay me quite well thank-you.
     
  7. moreluck

    moreluck golden ticket member

    My hubby works at golfing.....Tues. Thurs. Sat. and Sun. If he wins skins, he comes home with cash and we go out to lunch.
    Rough life, but someone's gotta do it.
     
  8. downtime8763

    downtime8763 Member

    I've been helping a couple of local farmers (they love it that someone know haw to drive a stick) as I worked on a dairy farm in my sop.n jr years of HS. A long with spending time with wife,kids,grand kids,fishing,camping,working in my shop. Who says that people who retire slow down,I just don't go by the time clock or diad anymore!
     
  9. brownmonster

    brownmonster Man of Great Wisdom

    My wife will have me on the go non stop. She has no sit in her pants.
     
  10. brown67

    brown67 Active Member

    What kind of photography do you do?
     
  11. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    Welcome to Hoke Smith Photography

    Landscape and urban landscape for fun.
    Weddings, portraiture, senior, family for money.
    I am working on some micro-stock which is mostly people in environmental situations.
     
  12. moreluck

    moreluck golden ticket member

    Love the pelican....my favorite to watch on our coast!
     
  13. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    If you like photography, I found this site very helpful when I started back into photography and still read their articles today.
    Many of the serious photographers use this site to keep improving.
    Digital Photography Tips: Digital Photography School

    Another very helpful source is to join a Photography club. I belong to 4 and I am on the Board of 2 of them so (not that being on the Board is that helpful to developing my photography skills).

    The fundamentals of photography are the same.
    The differences are the vast flexibility you have with digital compared to film.
    You can blast away but I have learned to slow down and take my time and concentrate on one good shot rather than 50 so-so shots.
    Take your time and think about what you are doing. Get high, get low, go left, go right, move back, move forward. Perspective is what separates the good images from really good images.

    Another thought is that with Digital, the shutter click is just the beginning.
    Today, you will be creating images rather than taking a picture.

    Buy Adobe PhotoShop Elements 10 and use it ... really use it.
    One's ability to use Elements (or Photoshop or Lightroom) is critical to getting sharp and saturated colors with a digital image.
    All digital cameras (except the Nikon D800e) have filters in them that make the images look dull and lifeless.
    Shoot RAW if your camera supports it and jpg.
    Note: The jpg out of the camera already has some sharpening, contrast and saturation applied to them so these are not the "dull and lifeless" images I am talking about.
     
  14. Jones

    Jones fILE A GRIEVE! Staff Member

    Very nice site Hoax, and that picture from the Great Smokies looks awful familiar. Might want to check the spelling though :wink2:
     
  15. brown67

    brown67 Active Member

    Great ideas thanks
     
  16. Jones

    Jones fILE A GRIEVE! Staff Member

    I'm currently using Silkypix to develop my RAW images (cuz it was free), but I'm thinking about picking up the latest version of Lightroom.
     
  17. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    LR4 has everything a photographer needs except Layers which is not absolutely necessary.

    I use LR for organization and mass produced processing like weddings, reunions, etc.
    I can take 600 pictures and pare them down to 300 and apply global enhancements to similar pictures and export for customer preview at 72 dpi/medium quality in 4 -5 hours.
     
  18. Jones

    Jones fILE A GRIEVE! Staff Member

    What/how do you calibrate your monitor? I've been eyeballing this but I'm not sure if it's worth the price.
     
  19. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    I currently use Colormunki and I calibrate my monitor and I use a Costco store close to work and I use their profile to ensure end-to-end synchronization.

    I am about ready to upgrade my calibration system and I will probably go to
    Datacolor Spyder4Pro Display Calibration System
    which is even more than the Express you linked to.
    I like the software with
    the Spyder products much better than the Xrite that comes with Colormunki which also uses the non-standard Pantone colors.
    Hardware is basically the same.


    In regards to Spyder Pro vs Spyder express - Pro software has more functionality in White balance adjustment, color profile tuning, etc.
    It also steps the user through the various aspects of calibration of RGB, brightness, and contrast settings on the monitor. After this, it measures, and makes a monitor profile with very slight tweaks to the color.
    In my case, since I use multiple monitors on my laptop and PC, the Pro allows the controlling of more than one monitor and therefore PC at a time.

    Another good site for technical aspects of Photography such as monitor calibration:
    Monitor Calibration for Photography
    After reading this, you can judge whether any calibration is even necessary or to what level you need to go.

    Skin tones are usually the main concern unless you are in Product photography then color calibration is king.
     
  20. rod

    rod retired and happy

    All I have to remember is to make sure there is a flashcube in my Instamatic.

    Kodak Instamatic Commercial (old) - YouTube