Cellular Device as GPS

How many PC drivers use their phone as a navigation tool while working their route?

Is memorizing your route more efficient than typing in the address for every stop? Seems like a time killer if you ask me. I know that using your phone is prohibited and management can most likely never find out that you used GPS on your phone (unless there are cameras in your truck) but, many of the rookie & veteran drivers at my hub have told me that you WILL use your cell phone at one point in your UPS career if you get lost or if management adds something new to your route, but it isn't necessary once you have your route memorized.
 

You've Got Mail

Well-Known Member
When I drove during peak, I used google maps to find every street. There's no other way to know where you're going if they throw you on a new route every day. I'd carry an extra battery, because one time my phone died but luckily I only had a few stops left.
 

oldngray

nowhere special
When I drove during peak, I used google maps to find every street. There's no other way to know where you're going if they throw you on a new route every day. I'd carry an extra battery, because one time my phone died but luckily I only had a few stops left.
Of course there is another way. It is called using a paper map.
 

You've Got Mail

Well-Known Member
Paper maps make memorization easier? If my first stop is 16 turns away from the hub, it's a lot easier to follow directions on my phone than to try and memorize 16 turns.

How old are you guys? Paper maps aren't the quickest or easiest way to get where you're going anymore.
 

2BadKneesPlease

Active Member
Paper maps make memorization easier? If my first stop is 16 turns away from the hub, it's a lot easier to follow directions on my phone than to try and memorize 16 turns.

How old are you guys? Paper maps aren't the quickest or easiest way to get where you're going anymore.
Agreed. Paper maps are completely obsolete. No need to type in every single address, find the street and work it. Repeat.
 

upschuck

Well-Known Member
Paper maps make memorization easier? If my first stop is 16 turns away from the hub, it's a lot easier to follow directions on my phone than to try and memorize 16 turns.

How old are you guys? Paper maps aren't the quickest or easiest way to get where you're going anymore.
You may be able to get there the first time faster, but you have no idea how you got there. Maps give you an overview were you have to figure it out, which aids in the memorization of the roads and lay of the land.
 
S

selfcancelsignal

Guest
Paper maps with streets or roads listed & talking to veteran drivers are the best ways to go out blind. Just work safe, ask for help with pickups or extra stops, & get in at 9 if you have to. For me, this is the best way to gain area knowledge. Use Google maps as a backup tool to find tricky out of the way stops, & NOT the turn by turn feature. It's all about area knowledge.
 

UpstateNYUPSer

Well-Known Member
Paper maps make memorization easier? If my first stop is 16 turns away from the hub, it's a lot easier to follow directions on my phone than to try and memorize 16 turns.

How old are you guys? Paper maps aren't the quickest or easiest way to get where you're going anymore.
They may not be the quickest as far as getting there but they are the quickest in learning how to get there every time thereafter.
 

Pooter

Well-Known Member
I use both. I always carry a paper map just in case I drop my phone in the toilet.

The faster you learn the area the easier the route gets. So limit your GPS to tricky addresses.

I will admit, once the sun goes down, it's nice having a gps find houses for you. :D
 

Richard Harrow

Deplorable.
Not necessary. If the company thought you needed a particular tool to be successful they would've given it to you.

The company does not compensate it's employees for purchasing maps or using their own personal cellphone.

My split driving days are long gone, but when I was given something I wasn't familiar with I would ask directions or just drive around until I found what I was looking for.
 

DumbTruckDriver

Allergic to cardboard.
I use all tools available to me. Use the phone quite a bit, but never for turn-by-turn navigation. That seems like a waste of time. If there are good maps available of the area I'm covering that day, I'll use those. But I've never had a problem getting the big picture with my phone. Talking to other drivers helps also. Maps help in getting you to your destination, but they can't tell you where to deliver.
 

upschuck

Well-Known Member
Not necessary. If the company thought you needed a particular tool to be successful they would've given it to you.

The company does not compensate it's employees for purchasing maps or using their own personal cellphone.

My split driving days are long gone, but when I was given something I wasn't familiar with I would ask directions or just drive around until I found what I was looking for.
Our center furnishes the maps, they go out to the Chamber of Commerce or Visitors Bureau, and most have free maps to take.
 

Mugarolla

Light 'em up!
Not necessary. If the company thought you needed a particular tool to be successful they would've given it to you.

The company does not compensate it's employees for purchasing maps or using their own personal cellphone.

My split driving days are long gone, but when I was given something I wasn't familiar with I would ask directions or just drive around until I found what I was looking for.
They don't compensate you for using you're cell phone because you don't need it to get your job done.

They will supply you with a map, or at least print outs from google maps of the areas that you will be delivering.

The map is a necessary tool to get your job done until you learn the area.

I was sent out in the blind once. Asked my boss for a map. He said we don't have any. I told him that I do know where the city is that my first stop is at. I told him, as I walked away, that I will drive around until I found the street.

Before I got 10 feet from him, he told me to come back and he gave me a map.
 
T

Turdferguson

Guest
Paper maps make memorization easier? If my first stop is 16 turns away from the hub, it's a lot easier to follow directions on my phone than to try and memorize 16 turns.

How old are you guys? Paper maps aren't the quickest or easiest way to get where you're going anymore.
Why do you have your phone out when you are driving?
 
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