Former UPS employee accused of stealing iPhone X

cheryl

I started this.
Staff member
Former UPS employee accused of stealing iPhone X - WDRB

A former UPS employee has been arrested months after police say he stole an iPhone X.

According to an arrest warrant, 33-year-old Jonas Mbonihankuye was employed with UPS back in July, when he removed a package from a UPS truck and took it with him into the bathroom.

Police say that package contained an iPhone X, worth $1,200. He then took the iPhone from the package and kept it, according to the warrant.
 

Jkloc420

Well-Known Member
Former UPS employee accused of stealing iPhone X - WDRB

A former UPS employee has been arrested months after police say he stole an iPhone X.

According to an arrest warrant, 33-year-old Jonas Mbonihankuye was employed with UPS back in July, when he removed a package from a UPS truck and took it with him into the bathroom.

Police say that package contained an iPhone X, worth $1,200. He then took the iPhone from the package and kept it, according to the warrant.
he must of activated it
 

oldngray

nowhere special
He must have tried to. ESN was blacklisted the moment it was reported stolen. The second someone keyed in the ESN of that device into a screen trying to put it on the network - game over.
Only thing one of those stolen phones are good for is parts. But every year some idiot will try to activate one anyway.
 

rod

#1 on Upstates "list"
Former UPS employee accused of stealing iPhone X - WDRB

A former UPS employee has been arrested months after police say he stole an iPhone X.

According to an arrest warrant, 33-year-old Jonas Mbonihankuye was employed with UPS back in July, when he removed a package from a UPS truck and took it with him into the bathroom.

Police say that package contained an iPhone X, worth $1,200. He then took the iPhone from the package and kept it, according to the warrant.
I'd arrest him just for having a last name like that.
 

Martini

Well-Known Member
This is kinda an 'urban myth' type story that I heard about at work and wondered if it actually could be possible or if it is bull#@%&.

A UPS employee stole a brand new iPhone while unloading a feeder truck.

Supposedly, once the thief got the phone home, they transferred their old phone number from their old phone to their new stolen Apple phone, and it worked okay and wasn't locked/blocked/traced -- because they bought a new SIM card and installed it in the stolen phone.

As the story goes, the thief didn't get caught because Apple traced it after the intended owner said they never received it -- they got busted with it because they couldn't keep their mouth shut and told a gossipy co-worker, who then reported it to management. LOL

Could that really be possible -- to transfer their old phone number to the stolen phone and it not be traceable?

Is it really that simple?
If it is, that's scary!
 

Operational needs

Virescit Vulnere Virtus
This is kinda an 'urban myth' type story that I heard about at work and wondered if it actually could be possible or if it is bull#@%&.

A UPS employee stole a brand new iPhone while unloading a feeder truck.

Supposedly, once the thief got the phone home, they transferred their old phone number from their old phone to their new stolen Apple phone, and it worked okay and wasn't locked/blocked/traced -- because they bought a new SIM card and installed it in the stolen phone.

As the story goes, the thief didn't get caught because Apple traced it after the intended owner said they never received it -- they got busted with it because they couldn't keep their mouth shut and told a gossipy co-worker, who then reported it to management. LOL

Could that really be possible -- to transfer their old phone number to the stolen phone and it not be traceable?

Is it really that simple?
If it is, that's scary!
Are you going to steal one if it’s that simple?
 

Indecisi0n

Well-Known Member
Let's see the video from the bathroom. The full video of people using it all day ...to prove it wasn't a setup
 

oldngray

nowhere special
This is kinda an 'urban myth' type story that I heard about at work and wondered if it actually could be possible or if it is bull#@%&.

A UPS employee stole a brand new iPhone while unloading a feeder truck.

Supposedly, once the thief got the phone home, they transferred their old phone number from their old phone to their new stolen Apple phone, and it worked okay and wasn't locked/blocked/traced -- because they bought a new SIM card and installed it in the stolen phone.

As the story goes, the thief didn't get caught because Apple traced it after the intended owner said they never received it -- they got busted with it because they couldn't keep their mouth shut and told a gossipy co-worker, who then reported it to management. LOL

Could that really be possible -- to transfer their old phone number to the stolen phone and it not be traceable?

Is it really that simple?
If it is, that's scary!
try it and find out
 

olroadbeech

Happy Verified UPSer
how does that thought even cross your mind to steal? the last 5 years i worked ( 5 years ago ) I made over 100k a year. add another 30-40k in bennies.
 

JJinVA

Well-Known Member
how does that thought even cross your mind to steal? the last 5 years i worked ( 5 years ago ) I made over 100k a year. add another 30-40k in bennies.
I say that all the time to the preloaders too. UPS gives you guys some of the best bennies in the nation, is one of only 20% of comapnies in the NATION that offers a pension, a decent hourly wage with overtime, and youre gonna risk losing all of that for something that you can afford to buy with no problem?

Not everyone makes good decisions in life though...
 

JJinVA

Well-Known Member
There is nothing in those packages that is worth stealing, IMHO.
The only time I even look at where a package is from is when Im leaving an info notice. Other than that I couldnt care less. Some stuff is obvious like wine or amazon packages, but it aint mine so Im not even curious.
 

Wrong

:))
We had a group of thieves who stole thousands $ in cell phones when I worked part time. The hub couldn’t really prove they were all involved but they all ended up getting fired or resigning. I don’t believe charges were ever brought but there was talk of us losing a contract over the amount of stolen phones.

Another one is medications, a guy in the PM shift would hide pills in his jug. The dude got busted by the guard shack employees and took off running grabbing the water jug and letting pills fall everywhere.

There will always be people who are short sighted, bad with money and lacking in morals grabbing hundreds while leaving behind the chance to work for millions.
 

Justaloader

Well-Known Member
This is kinda an 'urban myth' type story that I heard about at work and wondered if it actually could be possible or if it is bull#@%&.

A UPS employee stole a brand new iPhone while unloading a feeder truck.

Supposedly, once the thief got the phone home, they transferred their old phone number from their old phone to their new stolen Apple phone, and it worked okay and wasn't locked/blocked/traced -- because they bought a new SIM card and installed it in the stolen phone.

As the story goes, the thief didn't get caught because Apple traced it after the intended owner said they never received it -- they got busted with it because they couldn't keep their mouth shut and told a gossipy co-worker, who then reported it to management. LOL

Could that really be possible -- to transfer their old phone number to the stolen phone and it not be traceable?

Is it really that simple?
If it is, that's scary!
In short, no. The phone has an ESN (electronic serial number) that will always be trackable. The moment that phone is reported stolen or missing, it's blacklisted. At that point, "they" could trace the phone and attempt to press charges against whomever is in possession of it. (I used to work for Verizon Wireless) All depends on if they want to press charges and how far they are willing to go to get / catch the person.

Thinking a bit of the bigger picture - if the phone goes missing from UPS - UPS can track who the last person to "scan" the box was, and can go directly to that person and inquire as to where the package / phone is. That doesn't necessarily mean the last person that scanned it is 100% guilty, but, it gives UPS an intial suspect to go after.
 
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