My package went where?

aspenleaf

Well-Known Member
I checked the UPS tracking (yesterday) and my 2nd day air package was on time to be delivered today 6/28/06. I checked just now to see if it was still on time and see that it is now on its way to Fort Walton Beach, FL! I guess when it hit my hub it got on the wrong belt or someone missed typed the tracking number and now two packages have the same number since at 9:52 it hit my hub and a hub in MO at 9:55. . . guess I will have to wait and see if I get my package! Thankfully it is nothing important... :tongue_sm
 

lostintransit

Active Member
aspenleaf,

I had several NDA packages missing last year and after a lot of help here on the Brown Cafe and a bunch of phone calls to PICK UPS, I found out that apparently there are 3 types of scans: Physical, derivative, and logical. The customer service rep said that a lot of "missing" packages have the logical scan done, and I took it to mean that this is where it should be, not where it actually is. Anyway, not that it helps your situation but might clear up why it "scanned" in two different states within minutes - I hope you get your package!
 

aspenleaf

Well-Known Member
Hey Lostintransit,

Thanks for the info and I did get my package! I did not know we had that many types of scans. :)
 

wily_old_vet

Well-Known Member
Aspen-If you ever run into this problem again, go to the OMS at your center and ask them to track it. They get the much better tracking than we do on our home computers:)
 

aspenleaf

Well-Known Member
Wily, I sure will. I checked that tracking number and it is being used on a different package (the one going to FL). I am just glad I got mine. :wink:
 

beentheredonethat

Well-Known Member
lostintransit said:
aspenleaf,

I had several NDA packages missing last year and after a lot of help here on the Brown Cafe and a bunch of phone calls to PICK UPS, I found out that apparently there are 3 types of scans: Physical, derivative, and logical. The customer service rep said that a lot of "missing" packages have the logical scan done, and I took it to mean that this is where it should be, not where it actually is. Anyway, not that it helps your situation but might clear up why it "scanned" in two different states within minutes - I hope you get your package!
Just as an fyi. The derived and logical scan is one in the same thing. Some people use the term derived, some people logical. Here's how UPS does the scanning. A physical scan occur when we have a scanner and phyically scan the bar code on the pkg, prior to loading it into a package car or a smalls bag or an air igloo or a trailer. The biggest mistake we can make is if a loader is loading more then one trailer at the same time and his scanner is set for Trailer A when in fact he is loading in trailer B. This would result in us saying a pkg is someplace it is not. As far as derived or logical scans. When we tell the computers that the trailer has left the building then all the pkgs that were scanned into that trailer get a derived (or logical) scan indicating the trailer and the pkgs are on their way to the next building. When the trailer arrives to the destination center (the UPS location that loads it into the package cars that will deliver it) then we tell the computer that the trailer has arrived. Therefore, the computer derives a destination scan for each pkg that was already scanned into the trailer. Hope that explains it.
Beentheredonethat
 

beentheredonethat

Well-Known Member
lostintransit said:
aspenleaf,

I had several NDA packages missing last year and after a lot of help here on the Brown Cafe and a bunch of phone calls to PICK UPS, I found out that apparently there are 3 types of scans: Physical, derivative, and logical. The customer service rep said that a lot of "missing" packages have the logical scan done, and I took it to mean that this is where it should be, not where it actually is. Anyway, not that it helps your situation but might clear up why it "scanned" in two different states within minutes - I hope you get your package!
Just as an fyi. The derived and logical scan is one in the same thing. Some people use the term derived, some people logical. Here's how UPS does the scanning. A physical scan occur when we have a scanner and phyically scan the bar code on the pkg, prior to loading it into a package car or a smalls bag or an air igloo or a trailer. The biggest mistake we can make is if a loader is loading more then one trailer at the same time and his scanner is set for Trailer A when in fact he is loading in trailer B. This would result in us saying a pkg is someplace it is not. As far as derived or logical scans. When we tell the computers that the trailer has left the building then all the pkgs that were scanned into that trailer get a derived (or logical) scan indicating the trailer and the pkgs are on their way to the next building. When the trailer arrives to the destination center (the UPS location that loads it into the package cars that will deliver it) then we tell the computer that the trailer has arrived. Therefore, the computer derives a destination scan for each pkg that was already scanned into the trailer. Hope that explains it.
Beentheredonethat
 

lostintransit

Active Member
beenthere -

Great explanation, I couldn't get one service rep to give me any real definitions of the three scans they mentioned and you were able to do it in one paragraph! Maybe they don't even know that logical and derivitive are the same!
 

mrbill

Well-Known Member
The company runs from day to day ,"just get the packages out of the building", it runs by itself.Too much money invested in PAS to change.No buddy cares.
 

dannyboy

From the promised LAND
That means that they intended to ship out a package by us. More than likely, that package ended up in FDX ground or some other carrier, or is still sitting on the dock. Unless they let us know they have a package that is outbound......

I have also had shippers that have shipped a package, then decided to not ship it and waited several days to cancel the shipment. The whole time it shows billing information is there, but no scans or movement on the package.

What is bad is when you get several packages from one shipment, and the others drag in over the next several days. You track each one only to find some being left at hubs for a day, being sent to Baltimore instead of Knoxville, all sorts of stuff. Trying to get your shipping money back is a real challenge also.

d
 

iloadthetruck

Well-Known Member
I am curious if Aspen's problems were not due to missorting but because the shipper used a duplicate tracking number. Aspen, if that's so, give that tracking number to your OMS and have them file an ISP. When I worked on the hub we would have photocopied Worldship labels with the same trk# come through twice a week... no one caught that until the day someone called the center needing to track one of those packages.
 

aspenleaf

Well-Known Member
Well iloadthetruck the other package was del on 6/29 in FL and that package and mine had the same tracking number (at least according to the ups tracking website). I am not sure if it was from the same shipper or not but it does make you wonder about such things.
 

paco

Active Member
beentheredonethat said:
Just as an fyi. The derived and logical scan is one in the same thing. Some people use the term derived, some people logical. Here's how UPS does the scanning. A physical scan occur when we have a scanner and phyically scan the bar code on the pkg, prior to loading it into a package car or a smalls bag or an air igloo or a trailer. The biggest mistake we can make is if a loader is loading more then one trailer at the same time and his scanner is set for Trailer A when in fact he is loading in trailer B. This would result in us saying a pkg is someplace it is not. As far as derived or logical scans. When we tell the computers that the trailer has left the building then all the pkgs that were scanned into that trailer get a derived (or logical) scan indicating the trailer and the pkgs are on their way to the next building. When the trailer arrives to the destination center (the UPS location that loads it into the package cars that will deliver it) then we tell the computer that the trailer has arrived. Therefore, the computer derives a destination scan for each pkg that was already scanned into the trailer. Hope that explains it.
Beentheredonethat
You just detailed "Mistoggles". I had over 500 of those during peak.
 

upsdude

Well-Known Member
Couple years ago I ordered some parts and the shipper emailed me a tracking number. UPS.com only showed “Billing Information Received” for several days. I called them and raised *ell. They swore the parts had been shipped. The package arrived several days later never showing any other scans. I tracked it again the day after delivery, the Billing Info scan and delivery scan were the only detail listed.
 

Just Lurking

Well-Known Member
upsdude said:
Couple years ago I ordered some parts and the shipper emailed me a tracking number. UPS.com only showed “Billing Information Received” for several days. I called them and raised *ell. They swore the parts had been shipped. The package arrived several days later never showing any other scans. I tracked it again the day after delivery, the Billing Info scan and delivery scan were the only detail listed.

This is what I meant when I posted earlier.
 

SeniorGeek

Below the Line
upsdude said:
Couple years ago I ordered some parts and the shipper emailed me a tracking number. UPS.com only showed “Billing Information Received” for several days. I called them and raised *ell. They swore the parts had been shipped. The package arrived several days later never showing any other scans. I tracked it again the day after delivery, the Billing Info scan and delivery scan were the only detail listed.
That sounds like a missed origin scan. The derived (or "logical" or "virtual") scans rely on that physical (or "real" or "actual") scan as the package is loaded into a trailer, (container, masher, smalls bag,) etc. If that origin scan is missed, the package will not get the derived scans as the trailer progresses. Air Smalls have a lot of chances to be missed along the way - if the package does not get scanned into the smalls bag, or if the smalls bag does not get scanned into the air container, or if the air container....

I will stop there. If the container does not get scanned into the tail number, there is going to be a weight and balance error.

Some big shippers - those who load directly into trailers, smalls bags and/or air containers - are notoriously bad about getting everything scanned accurately, and upload of their scanning info is sometimes delayed.

UPS workforce-reduced me from TSG earlier this year, so now my main use of this knowledge is as a consignee.
 

tkess81

New Member
Beentheredonethat...

7 years later, and your explanation of derived/logical scans saved me from going ape-crap on my local UPS hub manager. I went to pick up my will call package, as my tracking number gave me the info that my package had arrived at its destination. I show up at the hub and she tells me that there were no physical scans on my package, only logical scans, and that my package may still be in the originating warehouse. It sounds like it is more likely sitting in a trailer on their yard waiting to be unloaded and scanned. I guess I'll find out tonight/tomorrow!!
 
Top