Part-Timers in My Building are Clueless

Snack

Well-Known Member
It's often been said around here that part-timers get left with the scraps when it comes to contract negotiations. It's easy to see why based on the questions and comments I receive from coworkers on the night sort.

Most of the people I've spoken with are completely ignorant of the process of negotiation and even voting. In fact, it seems the only reason they want to discuss the contract at all is to find out when they should be expecting their back pay check that so-and-so told them about.

Don't get me wrong, I fully support higher wages for part-time employees. We are well overdue for a raise. But it's frustrating to see so much apathy from my coworkers on an issue that will directly affect their lives.

Who is at fault? How can we/the union get part-timers involved and invested in the process?
 

Smashmouth

Well-Known Member
It's often been said around here that part-timers get left with the scraps when it comes to contract negotiations. It's easy to see why based on the questions and comments I receive from coworkers on the night sort.

Most of the people I've spoken with are completely ignorant of the process of negotiation and even voting. In fact, it seems the only reason they want to discuss the contract at all is to find out when they should be expecting their back pay check that so-and-so told them about.

Don't get me wrong, I fully support higher wages for part-time employees. We are well overdue for a raise. But it's frustrating to see so much apathy from my coworkers on an issue that will directly affect their lives.

Who is at fault? How can we/the union get part-timers involved and invested in the process?
EDUCATE THEM!....the company is counting on their apathy and lack of knowledge. They need to know the past and how people fought to get them what they have. They're the ones that are going to fight for us in the future.
 

Time for change

Well-Known Member
Educate them on the history of part time wages here! It’s been regression for decades. Check out what someone started at in 86 and what that would be in today’s dollars. Show them what that person that started in 86 makes now. Show them what the difference is compared to a driver and what the difference is going to be when they have 32 years in. We have gone backwards. We can’t even get a dollar or two catchup raise unless we are coming right off the street. Any part timer I talk to is automatic no vote when they realize a 3 year person will make the same as a new hire. Most can understand how absurd that is. Most can understand how absurd it is to call everyone skilled but some get the dollar and some don’t, FOREVER! And it angers many and it’s why we will hit the 50% threshold and vote this travesty of a contract down.
 

LagunaBrown

Well-Known Member
It's often been said around here that part-timers get left with the scraps when it comes to contract negotiations. It's easy to see why based on the questions and comments I receive from coworkers on the night sort.

Most of the people I've spoken with are completely ignorant of the process of negotiation and even voting. In fact, it seems the only reason they want to discuss the contract at all is to find out when they should be expecting their back pay check that so-and-so told them about.

Don't get me wrong, I fully support higher wages for part-time employees. We are well overdue for a raise. But it's frustrating to see so much apathy from my coworkers on an issue that will directly affect their lives.

Who is at fault? How can we/the union get part-timers involved and invested in the process?
That’s the million dollar question.
 

km3

Well-Known Member
Who is at fault? How can we/the union get part-timers involved and invested in the process?
Probably not possible. Except for preload, management pretty much leaves PTers alone. The level of harassment and mistreatment is nothing compared to what drivers get. So they don't care enough to get involved. Then there are those who do care, so much so that they're afraid to get involved because they don't trust the union. They're afraid of their own shadow, so they refuse to file grievances or call management out on safety issues. If they ever contacted the union, the union probably dismissed their complaints or concerns as nothing.

We can start by trying to keep them for more than a few months.
That's way too ambitious. How about trying to keep them for more than 3 days? It's been said that the company wants high turnover for PTers. Guess they finally got what they wanted. Nobody lasts a week anymore, let alone a year.
 
F

Frankie's Friend

Guest
Probably not possible. Except for preload, management pretty much leaves PTers alone. The level of harassment and mistreatment is nothing compared to what drivers get. So they don't care enough to get involved. Then there are those who do care, so much so that they're afraid to get involved because they don't trust the union. They're afraid of their own shadow, so they refuse to file grievances or call management out on safety issues. If they ever contacted the union, the union probably dismissed their complaints or concerns as nothing.



That's way too ambitious. How about trying to keep them for more than 3 days? It's been said that the company wants high turnover for PTers. Guess they finally got what they wanted. Nobody lasts a week anymore, let alone a year.
How does the company gain from revolving door employees?

The union gets tons of initiation fees from the turn over but how does the company gain from training the newbies over and over again?
 

Jkloc420

Well-Known Member
It's often been said around here that part-timers get left with the scraps when it comes to contract negotiations. It's easy to see why based on the questions and comments I receive from coworkers on the night sort.

Most of the people I've spoken with are completely ignorant of the process of negotiation and even voting. In fact, it seems the only reason they want to discuss the contract at all is to find out when they should be expecting their back pay check that so-and-so told them about.

Don't get me wrong, I fully support higher wages for part-time employees. We are well overdue for a raise. But it's frustrating to see so much apathy from my coworkers on an issue that will directly affect their lives.

Who is at fault? How can we/the union get part-timers involved and invested in the process?
@Tony Q gave me a 1000 bucks to vote yes
 

km3

Well-Known Member
How does the company gain from revolving door employees?

The union gets tons of initiation fees from the turn over but how does the company gain from training the newbies over and over again?
That's what I'm saying... The company doesn't want people to last a year, but they sure as heck don't want them quitting after a week either. 6-9 months is the sweet spot I think, long enough for a person to become decent at their job, without having to pay benefits.

@Tony Q gave me a 1000 bucks to vote yes
To the company and the union: I'll vote yes for a $10,000 bonus. Think about it. Thanks.
 

LagunaBrown

Well-Known Member
How does the company gain from revolving door employees?

The union gets tons of initiation fees from the turn over but how does the company gain from training the newbies over and over again?
You get a bunch of money put into your pension because the revolving employees never become vested participants so they don’t get a dime of pension and their contributions stay in the fund.
 

Jkloc420

Well-Known Member
That's what I'm saying... The company doesn't want people to last a year, but they sure as heck don't want them quitting after a week either. 6-9 months is the sweet spot I think, long enough for a person to become decent at their job, without having to pay benefits.



To the company and the union: I'll vote yes for a $10,000 bonus. Think about it. Thanks.
no you wont do none of this
 

llamainmypocket

Well-Known Member
How does the company gain from revolving door employees?

The union gets tons of initiation fees from the turn over but how does the company gain from training the newbies over and over again?
Training? There's no training for preload. They at least gain by not paying health insurance.
 
F

Frankie's Friend

Guest
You get a bunch of money put into your pension because the revolving employees never become vested participants so they don’t get a dime of pension and their contributions stay in the fund.
The part timers are in the company plan.
 
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