Plane crash kills UPS driver

Bertmontijo

New Member
A UPS delivery truck was destroyed in the crash. The company confirmed in an emailed statement to FOX 5 that an employee died.
It saddened my wife and I to find out that members of our community had been affected by the plane crash. We live in Santee a mile and a half from the crash. It also saddened us to learn of the loss of the UPS Driver, just doing his job, never expected what happened. God Bless the UPS, the first responders and neighbors who helped those in need...Bert Montijo
 
Read the reports and analysis of the crash. Pilot missed his approach and was supposed to circle back to try again. Became disoriented in the clouds and instead of climbing, he was descending. SoCal approach aka air traffic controller practically pleaded with the pilot to climb but it was too late. RIP Steve Krueger.
 

Lineandinitial

Well-Known Member
Read the reports and analysis of the crash. Pilot missed his approach and was supposed to circle back to try again. Became disoriented in the clouds and instead of climbing, he was descending. SoCal approach aka air traffic controller practically pleaded with the pilot to climb but it was too late. RIP Steve Krueger.
Impossible. You probably read some speculation from a "News" source or some "Expert".....

He never entered the pattern for MYF.

The NTSB report is the only one that counts and the Preliminary is typically 2 weeks out at the earliest and the Final perhaps a year.
 

oldngray

nowhere special
Impossible. You probably read some speculation from a "News" source or some "Expert".....

He never entered the pattern for MYF.

The NTSB report is the only one that counts and the Preliminary is typically 2 weeks out at the earliest and the Final perhaps a year.
They did release the voice recordings. The pilot was fighting engine trouble and sounds like he got disoriented.



 

Lineandinitial

Well-Known Member
All I hear are some abbreviated responses from the pilot acknowledging step down approach instructions on the links (ATC Live).
Nothing about any engine trouble or Type II Spatial Disorientation on any recording I can find.
Maybe my computer battery is low….
 

Lineandinitial

Well-Known Member
How do you become disoriented in broad daylight with clear skys at his altitude?
He seemed to reply with every altitude instruction, so until he was about 4000 ft, he seemed ok.
If the ATC Live recordings are accurate, he may have been over saturated with altitude commands and got behind the airplane.
 

rod

Retired 19 years
He seemed to reply with every altitude instruction, so until he was about 4000 ft, he seemed ok.
If the ATC Live recordings are accurate, he may have been over saturated with altitude commands and got behind the airplane.
He must have been looking a gauges and not out the window otherwise he could have clearly seen he was nosing it in.
 

Lineandinitial

Well-Known Member
I finally found a complete tape on YouTube.

ATC commands were a bit confusing.
May have been an IMC upset, or no additional power to climb. I didn't detect impairment in his abbreviated responses. Just typical Indian speech....

This will be a tough one for the NTSB.

Tragic.
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
How do you become disoriented in broad daylight with clear skys at his altitude?
Cloud deck ceiling at 1700 ft. With a a 2000 ft(3700 ft. total) vertical top. This put him right in the middle of the clouds. His approach started at 2000 ft.

He went missed on the approach and his approach clearance was canceled and told to climb to 5k. This was because he was so erratic.
His airspeed varied by 100 kts on the flight to the airport. He was in trouble from the start.

Circle to land approaches are the most dangerous kind. This is what the Tahoe jet(a few months ago) was trying also. Circle to land is usually for nearby obstacles(usually mountains) and require tight turns and low altitudes....tough in a high performance jet as they are usually hand flown(no auto-pilot). Most major airlines avoid/ban them altogether) letting smaller regional types try. This is
why Regionals have poor safety records(relatively). They go to smaller more remote places.

looks like he had plenty of speed---- altitude --- not so much at the end
Actually crashed at over 250 kts....that's fast. He came out of the clouds at 250........nose down and turning.

I finally found a complete tape on YouTube.

ATC commands were a bit confusing.
May have been an IMC upset, or no additional power to climb. I didn't detect impairment in his abbreviated responses. Just typical Indian speech....

This will be a tough one for the NTSB.

Tragic.
I disagree.

ATC was pretty clear. Pilot was not.

Get thereitis played a big role in this. He was a busy Doc and flew his plane to his various clinics. This is very common. Busy Docs make lot's of money this way and having to cancel or divert costs them big bucks.......so they press a bad situation.....for money. A common tale.

Single pilot IFR in a complex(twin) high performance airplane is the most risky. His plane was older and is thought to be very original in instrumentation. That's why most airlines have 2 pilots....one flying, one working the radios and double checking the flying pilot.
 
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quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
Read the reports and analysis of the crash. Pilot missed his approach and was supposed to circle back to try again. Became disoriented in the clouds and instead of climbing, he was descending. SoCal approach aka air traffic controller practically pleaded with the pilot to climb but it was too late. RIP Steve Krueger.
True except the original clearance HAD a circle to land instruction. This complicated what would have been a routine straight in approach......the instrument approach was to one runway but that wasn't in use. He was to circle to another(that was being used) after completing the final approach. Fast, tight circles in a high performance airplane are fun in clear wide open skies.....not after being totally out of control and breaking out of the clouds....

The approach was sort of used to get him to the airport and close. Likely because the other runway in use doesn't have an IFR approach(guessing). Airplanes are asked to do all sorts of changes on approaches such as side stepping......say there are 2 parallel runways and one gets fouled for some reason.....ATC asks if or instructs for changes such as side stepping or even doing 360 turns for spacing.....happens all the time. This happens with spacing of faster and slower aircraft.....Piper Cub vs. 747 for example.
 
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