Rockhounder's club (on topic)

zubenelgenubi

天安门大屠杀
I enjoy getting out in nature, but I also like to be doing something to really get the full outdoor experience. This thread is for anyone who likes to get out and look for cool rocks. Discuss your methodology, favorite types of rocks and locations for searching, post pics of your favorite finds.

To get started, I like to walk rivers and streams, do a little snorkeling, comb gravel bars. Mostly find agates, jaspers and petrified wood, some quartz crystals from time to time. Here's a few of the pics I just happen to have on my device at the moment.

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On the left is what I believe to be a holly blue agate, next to a redish stained agate for contrast.

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Top left is a piece of red carnelian agate, the rest are sunstone feldspar crystals.

More to follow....
 

sailfish

idiot.
I've snapped a handful of cool rock formation pictures over the years. From a geologic standpoint I couldn't tell you much about them, but in these particular examples I find it interesting that they all seem to be "layered".

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rod

Retired 19 years
Have you seen that new yooperlite some dude in Mich discovered? Glows under ultraviolet light.
 
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zubenelgenubi

天安门大屠杀
I've snapped a handful of cool rock formation pictures over the years. From a geologic standpoint I couldn't tell you much about them, but in these particular examples I find it interesting that they all seem to be "layered".

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Layered formations most certainly are sedimentary, the area used to be under water, and the layers compressed and compacted under the weight of the higher layers. The second photo looks like some sort of slate or shale. I'm not great at identifying any given rock, but the ones I know, I can identify pretty readily.
 

sailfish

idiot.
Layered formations most certainly are sedimentary, the area used to be under water, and the layers compressed and compacted under the weight of the higher layers. The second photo looks like some sort of slate or shale. I'm not great at identifying any given rock, but the ones I know, I can identify pretty readily.
All the more notable by the fact of how high above the water level most of the formations along the valley are now.
 
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