White Guilt - Getting Beyond Race

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
Shelby Steele has been discussing this for 30 years or more ...

White Guilt - How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era
In 1955 the murderers of Emmett Till, a black Mississippi youth, were acquitted of their crime, undoubtedly because they were white. Forty years later, O. J. Simpson, whom many thought would be charged with murder by virtue of the DNA evidence against him, went free after his attorney portrayed him as a victim of racism. Clearly, a sea change had taken place in American culture, but how had it happened? In this important new work, distinguished race relations scholar Shelby Steele argues that the age of white supremacy has given way to an age of white guilt -- and neither has been good for African Americans.

As the civil rights victories of the 1960s dealt a blow to racial discrimination, American institutions started acknowledging their injustices, and white Americans -- who held the power in those institutions -- began to lose their moral authority. Since then, our governments and universities, eager to reclaim legitimacy and avoid charges of racism, have made a show of taking responsibility for the problems of black Americans. In doing so, Steele asserts, they have only further exploited blacks, viewing them always as victims, never as equals. This phenomenon, which he calls white guilt, is a way for whites to keep up appearances, to feel righteous, and to acquire an easy moral authority -- all without addressing the real underlying problems of African Americans. Steele argues that calls for diversity and programs of affirmative action serve only to stigmatize minorities, portraying them not as capable individuals but as people defined by their membership in a group for which exceptions must be made.

Through his articulate analysis and engrossing recollections of the last half-century of American race relations, Steele calls for a new culture of personal responsibility, a commitment to principles that can fill the moral void created by white guilt. White leaders must stop using minorities as a means to establish their moral authority -- and black leaders must stop indulging them. As White Guilt eloquently concludes, the alternative is a dangerous ethical relativism that extends beyond race relations into all parts of American life.

White guilt is a culturally and historically contingent emotion rooted in White
people’s recognition of unearned privileges and collective and/or individual roles in the
perpetuation of racism.


 

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
‘Mr. Trump’s special charisma is that he seems to function entirely outside the framework of today’s cultural liberalism.’ January 2017 - Shelby Steele
"What I hope for in the Trump presidency is exactly the cultural battle that he already seems to have engaged. Even before taking office he has put himself at odds with America’s entrenched cultural and institutional liberalism, and brought deep insecurity to its standard-bearers."
 

Turdferguson

Just a turd
‘Mr. Trump’s special charisma is that he seems to function entirely outside the framework of today’s cultural liberalism.’ January 2017 - Shelby Steele
"What I hope for in the Trump presidency is exactly the cultural battle that he already seems to have engaged. Even before taking office he has put himself at odds with America’s entrenched cultural and institutional liberalism, and brought deep insecurity to its standard-bearers."
Trump is just a butthole, nothing special about him. Loud mouth :censored2: who if he wasn’t rich would be doing time for sexual assault, and on the sex offender watch list
 

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
Trump is just a butthole, nothing special about him. Loud mouth :censored2: who if he wasn’t rich would be doing time for sexual assault, and on the sex offender watch list
Race Issues in America
“We have betrayed [Martin Luther] King’s vision of making race irrelevant and wasted another couple generations.
Black people have declined more so than during the era of segregation.
We have to get beyond race at some point,” Shelby Steele says.
 

Turdferguson

Just a turd
Race Issues in America
“We have betrayed [Martin Luther] King’s vision of making race irrelevant and wasted another couple generations.
Black people have declined more so than during the era of segregation.
We have to get beyond race at some point,” Shelby Steele says.
I disagree. Look around at all the successful black professionals in society today. No one thinks anything of it in today's world. When you level the playing field racial deversity will happen naturally
 

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
I disagree. Look around at all the successful black professionals in society today. No one thinks anything of it in today's world. When you level the playing field racial diversity will happen naturally
You don't think there is a level the playing field?

In what ways is it not level?

For what type of people is it not level?
 

BrownArmy

Well-Known Member
You don't think there is a level the playing field?

In what ways is it not level?

For what type of people is it not level?
ORLY?

Ta-Nehisi Coates

Lots to digest, even if you don’t agree with the author, but this dude is a fantastic writer.

But, no, the playing field isn’t level, and it never was.

You seem like a smart dude, perhaps you have a blind spot?
 

bbsam

Moderator
Staff member
Shelby Steele has been discussing this for 30 years or more ...

White Guilt - How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era
In 1955 the murderers of Emmett Till, a black Mississippi youth, were acquitted of their crime, undoubtedly because they were white. Forty years later, O. J. Simpson, whom many thought would be charged with murder by virtue of the DNA evidence against him, went free after his attorney portrayed him as a victim of racism. Clearly, a sea change had taken place in American culture, but how had it happened? In this important new work, distinguished race relations scholar Shelby Steele argues that the age of white supremacy has given way to an age of white guilt -- and neither has been good for African Americans.

As the civil rights victories of the 1960s dealt a blow to racial discrimination, American institutions started acknowledging their injustices, and white Americans -- who held the power in those institutions -- began to lose their moral authority. Since then, our governments and universities, eager to reclaim legitimacy and avoid charges of racism, have made a show of taking responsibility for the problems of black Americans. In doing so, Steele asserts, they have only further exploited blacks, viewing them always as victims, never as equals. This phenomenon, which he calls white guilt, is a way for whites to keep up appearances, to feel righteous, and to acquire an easy moral authority -- all without addressing the real underlying problems of African Americans. Steele argues that calls for diversity and programs of affirmative action serve only to stigmatize minorities, portraying them not as capable individuals but as people defined by their membership in a group for which exceptions must be made.

Through his articulate analysis and engrossing recollections of the last half-century of American race relations, Steele calls for a new culture of personal responsibility, a commitment to principles that can fill the moral void created by white guilt. White leaders must stop using minorities as a means to establish their moral authority -- and black leaders must stop indulging them. As White Guilt eloquently concludes, the alternative is a dangerous ethical relativism that extends beyond race relations into all parts of American life.

White guilt is a culturally and historically contingent emotion rooted in White
people’s recognition of unearned privileges and collective and/or individual roles in the
perpetuation of racism.


It’s almost like race has next to nothing to do with relationships in America. It’s a cultural point of reference and nothing more.

With that in mind, the murderers of Emmitt Till and OJ Simpson are not at all different. They are the relatively rich and powerful of their respective times.

In other words, nothing at all has changed and Mr. Steele has found his own cash cow in an intellectual debate at the same cultural point of reference.

The rich and powerful win. Always.
 

Wrong

:))
Shelby Steele has been discussing this for 30 years or more ...

White Guilt - How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era
In 1955 the murderers of Emmett Till, a black Mississippi youth, were acquitted of their crime, undoubtedly because they were white. Forty years later, O. J. Simpson, whom many thought would be charged with murder by virtue of the DNA evidence against him, went free after his attorney portrayed him as a victim of racism. Clearly, a sea change had taken place in American culture, but how had it happened? In this important new work, distinguished race relations scholar Shelby Steele argues that the age of white supremacy has given way to an age of white guilt -- and neither has been good for African Americans.

As the civil rights victories of the 1960s dealt a blow to racial discrimination, American institutions started acknowledging their injustices, and white Americans -- who held the power in those institutions -- began to lose their moral authority. Since then, our governments and universities, eager to reclaim legitimacy and avoid charges of racism, have made a show of taking responsibility for the problems of black Americans. In doing so, Steele asserts, they have only further exploited blacks, viewing them always as victims, never as equals. This phenomenon, which he calls white guilt, is a way for whites to keep up appearances, to feel righteous, and to acquire an easy moral authority -- all without addressing the real underlying problems of African Americans. Steele argues that calls for diversity and programs of affirmative action serve only to stigmatize minorities, portraying them not as capable individuals but as people defined by their membership in a group for which exceptions must be made.

Through his articulate analysis and engrossing recollections of the last half-century of American race relations, Steele calls for a new culture of personal responsibility, a commitment to principles that can fill the moral void created by white guilt. White leaders must stop using minorities as a means to establish their moral authority -- and black leaders must stop indulging them. As White Guilt eloquently concludes, the alternative is a dangerous ethical relativism that extends beyond race relations into all parts of American life.

White guilt is a culturally and historically contingent emotion rooted in White
people’s recognition of unearned privileges and collective and/or individual roles in the
perpetuation of racism.


I don’t view people by the color of their skin. Could care less if you are a minority ethnicity.

I counter act my white guilt with my homo card. I don’t feel entitled to any “privledges” only my rights.
 
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