Hoover: Why UPS is my greatest American co.

Discussion in 'The Latest UPS Headlines' started by cheryl, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. cheryl

    cheryl I started this. Staff Member

    Hoover: Why UPS is my greatest American co. - Austin Business Journal

    In this age of Wal-Mart and trillion-dollar federal budgets, we are used to seeing giant, hard-to-grasp numbers. But UPS is a human-level business. Use science, technology and algorithms as it might, the guts of the company is still people carrying around packages, often one at a time.

    Our lives today would be much different without UPS, and its excellent archrival FedEx. The competition makes them both stronger. Without these guys, there would be no Amazon.com Inc. — no e-commerce. Think about what you — or the shipper — pays UPS for each package. For a few bucks, they can get it across the country in a day or two. Few organizations of any type add as much value to our economic well-being.

    But perhaps most important, think about what UPS means to its employees and, through them, to the U.S. economy. Those 398,000 workers make UPS roughly tied with McDonald’s Corp. as the third-biggest employer among U.S. companies. Those employees are famously well-paid. Last I checked, driver base pay ran about $30 an hour. With overtime, your driver likely makes $80,000 to 100,000 per year. Their health benefits are fully paid for their entire family. They have generous pensions and extensive annual leave for the most senior drivers. One report indicated that the average driver has been with the company more than 16 years with turnover estimated at less than 2 percent per year.
     
  2. texan

    texan Well-Known Member

    Great article, great post.
     
  3. browned out

    browned out Active Member

    $100,000 a year......what? That would be a driver working close to the dot max 60 hours a week for the entire year. Anyone can get a driver job; they just have to work part-time starting at $9.50 to $10.50 an hour for anywhere between 4 and 8 years and then another 3 years to get to top wage. OH yeah; they also need to have an extrodinary work ethic and high pysical and mental stress threshold. People ask me all the time. I tell em to go to UPS.com and get a job.
     
  4. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    I think Nancy Pelosi would say that a UPS Driver won the lottery of life ... just fortunate.
     
  5. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    It's the 22.3 that win the "lottery" if anyone came close at UPS. The ability to work 40 hours and have plenty of time to improve oneself, spend time with family, that precious thing called "time", outside of the wage slavery.
     
  6. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    Understand your point which is VERY valid.

    The reference here is to the wage total at the end of the year.
     
  7. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    "But perhaps most important, think about what UPS means to its employees and, through them, to the U.S. economy. Those 398,000 workers make UPS roughly tied with McDonald’s Corp. as the third-biggest employer among U.S. companies. Those employees are famously well-paid. Last I checked, driver base pay ran about $30 an hour. With overtime, your driver likely makes $80,000 to 100,000 per year. Their health benefits are fully paid for their entire family. They have generous pensions and extensive annual leave for the most senior drivers. One report indicated that the average driver has been with the company more than 16 years with turnover estimated at less than 2 percent per year."

    Drivers working 60 or 70 hours a week, could take those extra 30 and do something less stressful and damaging to health and mind, including another job/career. When we had a local driver basically heat-stroke and suffocate in the back of the truck a couple years ago, that was a wake-up call for me.

    Also I didn't realize you were talking about wages specifically, but I guess "lottery" would indicate that. The article references benefits, retirement, paid leave, etc, and all FTs are generally equal there.
     
  8. bellesmom

    bellesmom Member

    It depends on where you are a 22.3 as some of us aren't so "lucky".