"Overallowed" Comes to Feeders

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by over9five, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Yes, they have posted our over/under.

    Well, over anyhow. I don't think there were any under.

    I'm very disappointed in this. SAFETY has always been Job One in Feeders. Is this a departure from that?
     
  2. toonertoo

    toonertoo Most Awesome Dog Staff Member

    Yup, Only if it can be blamed on you. They will never admit to doing anything to make anyone work unsafely. I am thankful you wont be intimidated.
     
  3. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    Over, why should feeders be any bit different than delivery? Just because you only have to buckle and unbuckle your seatbelt 4 times a night?

    UPS is obsessed with numbers. Until now, you've had a free pass............

    d
     
  4. over9five

    over9five Moderator Staff Member

    Exactly. This fact alone demonstrates how limited a Feeder drivers options are in reducing his overallowed. There is really only ONE WAY.

    Drive faster.
     
  5. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    Over

    My experience with most feeder drivers is that they do drive the posted speed for the roads they are traveling. That does not take into affect bad weather or other contributing road problems.

    But on the other hand, I have seen feeder drivers on a sunny warm day, with minimal traffic, drive 10-15 MPH UNDER the posted speed limit for trucks. Not sure why, but I never saw a reason for it.

    I am sure feeders is much like management and delivery. There are those that are worth their weight in gold, others are not worth the ground they stand on.

    d
     
  6. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    Tie, is it possible that you are saying that there is actually more work that the feeder driver is doing, than a person behind a computer screen would have a concept of, and would allow time for?

    d
     
  7. menotyou

    menotyou bella amicizia

    My experience is the preload sup's using feeder drivers as number pumpers.
     
  8. raceanoncr

    raceanoncr Well-Known Member

    d and tie, let me chime in here. As a retired feeder driver, well 30 of my 32 yrs was in feeder, I can attest to the validity of both statements.

    About the last half of my career was spent on sleeper or mileage but I kept and still (as you do danny) keep in touch with other drivers. Tie is right that most on-road times are pretty good, on paper. Most turn-around times are crap! Won't go into ALL the details here but one example comes to mind:

    Driver was dispatched to another hub. Was given only 4 min, on arrival, to post, break doubles, spot dolly, spot trailer in door, raise trailer in door (when we had mostly air/hydraulic legs), pull out, go inside, sign off CCR and punch whatever was next. Reasonable? I think not. Did he tell scheduler? Of course. Was anything done. Again, of course not. Did he care that he was over? After that, of course not.

    Show more shifts on IVIS? Most hubs/centers don't want anymore shifting on their record. OK. You put in 2 and 1 when you actually did 3 and 1...there ain't no room for that unless you brought in enough trailers to justify. Also, home domicile then complains that you're showing too many moves. I used to figger that anything I had to touch that was out of the ordinary was a move but home doesn't feel that way.

    What else can be done? Ride with me and SHOW me how you can do this turnaround faster in the UPS safe way!
     
  9. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    Race

    You bring up a point that is missed many times.

    UPS, instead of being one giant business, is actually made up of hundreds of smaller components which have to work together to make the larger picture a reality.

    Feeders, preload, hub, delivery all work on tight schedules. And pretty much independent from one another. All have "numbers to make" and want to cut time off their shifts or "segment of their part of the business." No one wants to show any extra time, regardless of the time spent doing what was asked.

    Just like preload and drivers. IT does not matter how many hours the drivers have to work to get closed up and on road, they dont want but 10 hundredths showing on preload time. But they sure as shooting dont want the 30 extra hours that was spent by 60 drivers cleaning up the mess when they sent the preload home early.

    We are going to get paid, one way or another to do the job. You can either pay 25 preloaders to clean up the mess, or 60 drivers. The problem lies where to "bill out" the costs in doing so. Unfortunately, all inside (non driving) business components or segments at UPS depend on shifting this other work done on their sorts to the drivers, both delivery and feeder.

    The problem with that is that we are constantly being pushed to compensate for the lackluster performance of those other segment. And to compensate without spending any time doing so.

    Its a racket. For the drivers, its a no win situation.

    But what I do have a problem with is management sending out drivers 45 minutes later than normal, not giving any air help, demanding that timed deliveries be made on time, and the drivers be back in less than 10 hours with an 10 hour dispatched day.

    And they wonder when the drivers fail.

    d
     
  10. Anonymous 10

    Anonymous 10 Guest

    All feeder drivers are ass bustin freight hauling animals.
     
  11. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    FNN: Feeders under attack
     
  12. soberups

    soberups Pees in the brown Koolaid

    And in the metrics-obsessed cult of fear that is UPS management, it is perfectly acceptable to spend $500 in order to save a dime as long as you make sure that the dime shows up on your report while the $500 shows up on someone elses.
     
  13. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    Sober, that is so true. And that is why in some centers, exess time is pigeon holed as safety, when in reality, no safety meeting or training took place. Its all about appearances.

    d
     
  14. cosmictrucker

    cosmictrucker Trucking is I

    I concur


     
  15. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    I was going to reply that you must be hanging around Sober and them I realized it was you. LOL
     
  16. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    There is a T/A allowance for the activity Tie described. The schedule may not include that actual activity in it. The driver has the. Ability to enter the right code.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  17. dannyboy

    dannyboy From the promised LAND

    So why does the feeder driver have the ability to add a code for something that is not ordinary, but not delivery drivers. Any one that has been behind the wheel knows that each day is different.

    Each day brings challenges that you might only have once a week or month. So why not allow for that as well.

    On the other hand, there are things that happen almost daily, like the proper AM time So instead of lying about it, or if it makes you feel better, incorrectly assigning time, why not a special code. After all, if we dont document the time, it did not happen. So instead of documenting it, we stick the head in the sand, and pretend it did not happen.......of course not until the next day when we wonder why so many of our drivers did not "have a good day" on paper.

    d
     
  18. upserr1

    upserr1 New Member

    hurry up and be safe lol the two don't go hand and hand but then we do work for ups why dosn't the national safety board look into this
     
  19. Sleeve_meet_Heart

    Sleeve_meet_Heart making the unreadable unreadabler

    this should have been investigated for all drivers no matter the vehicle or company. Anyone being coerced and harrassed into "rushing" while operating equipment that can injure or kill someone should be investigated.
     
  20. Monkey Butt

    Monkey Butt You can call me Chappy Staff Member

    I'm glad to see you never go over the speed limit in your personal or company vehicle.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011