Can you be fired for load quality?

PTPeanuts

Well-Known Member
I just got switched to preload and everyone seems to hate me.
All of the other part-timers are morose and sullen. They just stare listlessly at the belt and don't talk to each other. No one really told me how to load or anything.
When the drivers came and saw their trucks they seemed to be steaming.
I loaded 3 trucks, one driver just avoided the entire area until I left, another just glared at me without saying anything, and the 3rd took one look at the truck and then stormed off to complain about me to the sup.
I'm not sure what I did that was so wrong but I loaded everything where it was supposed to go, unless the shelf was full, in which case I stuck it on the floor.
I don't see it getting any better since no one talks to me or tells me what I'm supposed to do. Can you get fired just for load quality?
 

zubenelgenubi

Well-Known Member
I just got switched to preload and everyone seems to hate me.
All of the other part-timers are morose and sullen. They just stare listlessly at the belt and don't talk to each other. No one really told me how to load or anything.
When the drivers came and saw their trucks they seemed to be steaming.
I loaded 3 trucks, one driver just avoided the entire area until I left, another just glared at me without saying anything, and the 3rd took one look at the truck and then stormed off to complain about me to the sup.
I'm not sure what I did that was so wrong but I loaded everything where it was supposed to go, unless the shelf was full, in which case I stuck it on the floor.
I don't see it getting any better since no one talks to me or tells me what I'm supposed to do. Can you get fired just for load quality?

Just a little perspective, whenever I try to show my loaders how to do something better, they tend to take offense. I get frustrated at poor load quality, but I also understand that the loading job is pretty rough, especially on new guys. The frustration comes from being in a more-or-less unwinnable situation. When I do finally develop a rapport with my loader, and things start working better, I get a new loader.

I'm guessing the drivers understand the spot you're in, but don't want to take anything out on you, so they are avoiding you for now. Try your best, and look for any opportunity to talk to your drivers and ask for pointers. Be prepared for a little heat from them at first.
 

Dough99

Well-Known Member
I just got switched to preload and everyone seems to hate me.
All of the other part-timers are morose and sullen. They just stare listlessly at the belt and don't talk to each other. No one really told me how to load or anything.
When the drivers came and saw their trucks they seemed to be steaming.
I loaded 3 trucks, one driver just avoided the entire area until I left, another just glared at me without saying anything, and the 3rd took one look at the truck and then stormed off to complain about me to the sup.
I'm not sure what I did that was so wrong but I loaded everything where it was supposed to go, unless the shelf was full, in which case I stuck it on the floor.
I don't see it getting any better since no one talks to me or tells me what I'm supposed to do. Can you get fired just for load quality?
You’re doing great.Keep it up!! Once the drivers leave it’s not your problem anymore!
 
I’m guessing you’re in the union and not on probationary period.

If a Sup tries to discipline or yell at you for load quality, ask them if they can please load all 3 trucks while you shadow them as you’ve had zero training. Once they start stacking out and struggling they’ll let you start loading again and will leave you alone.

Talk to your drivers and just ask them what you can do better when loading to make their day easier. I was taught how to load well by my drivers back in the day. They probably just overreacted to a *ty load and a new face, it happens don’t take it personal.

Just show up on time everyday, follow the methods, and give an honest effort.
 

Arch

Well-Known Member
The drivers that complain are likely the ones that never came from preload. Or only thinks of themselves.

Next time they mess with you, mess up their load even more. They'll get the message and leave you alone.
 

eats packages

Brings a Switch to work
I just got switched to preload and everyone seems to hate me.
All of the other part-timers are morose and sullen. They just stare listlessly at the belt and don't talk to each other. No one really told me how to load or anything.
When the drivers came and saw their trucks they seemed to be steaming.
I loaded 3 trucks, one driver just avoided the entire area until I left, another just glared at me without saying anything, and the 3rd took one look at the truck and then stormed off to complain about me to the sup.
I'm not sure what I did that was so wrong but I loaded everything where it was supposed to go, unless the shelf was full, in which case I stuck it on the floor.
I don't see it getting any better since no one talks to me or tells me what I'm supposed to do. Can you get fired just for load quality?
-Stacking only the long things is my forte. Saves a lot of headache not trying to cram a 7-foot tube over 10 different boxes until the last minute, or hitting you head on some **** sticking out. plus they stack real nicely against the back of the cars, just make sure they won't fall. I would load everything else immediately.
-2 feet in front of the belt/boxline and the entire width in the vehicles is how you get in and out like a meth-snorting jackrabbit.
-If given the option between blowing out your walkway and letting the package ride the belt, let it ride the belt.
-Just write the XXXX numbers, HUGE FONT, legibly, on literally everything, facing you. Makes loading a lot easier on the brain. The only people that can get away with not using the numbers are people who had sequence charts 15 years ago for the same routes.
-If you recieved a preload methods packet then there should also be some info on package placement, lip loading, package selection, etc. Do not go overboard on these methods, they are more a rule-of-thumb. But following them half-decently makes life a lot easier.
 

Days

Well-Known Member
-Stacking only the long things is my forte. Saves a lot of headache not trying to cram a 7-foot tube over 10 different boxes until the last minute, plus they stack real nicely against the back of the cars, just make sure they won't fall. I would load everything else immediately.
-2 feet in front of the belt/boxline and the entire width in the vehicles is how you get in and out like a meth-snorting jackrabbit.
-If given the option between blowing out your walkway and letting the package ride the belt, let it ride the belt.
-Just write the XXXX numbers, HUGE FONT, legibly, on literally everything, facing you. Makes loading a lot easier on the brain. The only people that can get away with not using the numbers are people who had sequence charts 15 years ago for the same routes.
(If you recieved a preload methods packet then there should also be some info on package placement, lip loading, package selection, etc. Do not go overboard on these methods, they are more a rule-of-thumb. But following them half-decently makes life a lot easier)

Long packages especially heavy ones stacked out are asking for an injury. Plus they can fall over and dent or scratch the trucks.
 

eats packages

Brings a Switch to work
Long packages especially heavy ones stacked out are asking for an injury. Plus they can fall over and dent or scratch the trucks.
They literally never fall over, It's 40+ pounds angled right into the package cars, more sturdy than anything I can come up with using normal boxes.

With that being said. OP should not attempt this unless they are certain they won't fall. Like in my case, where they never ever fall over. It's been 2 years.

And of course, I have hit my face repeatedly on these stupid tubes sticking out of other loads, loads my drivers may frantically put together. Far more dangerous in my book.
 

PTPeanuts

Well-Known Member
I'm still not sure what I did that was so bad to that guy's truck. I'm pretty sure I got everything on the correct shelf.
How big of a deal is it for the packages to literally be in counting order? Like 1000 at the front of the 1000 shelf and 1900 at the end of the 1000 shelf?
Because I started out trying to do that but towards the end I had no more room and it wasn't possible to do anymore without stopping and rearranging the entire shelf, which really isn't an option.
 

PTPeanuts

Well-Known Member
Also what is the deal with the numbering anyways?
Who decides that?
I had like 30 packages that were supposed to go on the 5000 shelf, and they were all medium to big sized boxes.
I put like 7 on there and the entire 5000 shelf was already full.
So my sup walks over and says "Well look at your plan, see how the floor has 0 packages planned on it, just start putting them there."
Ok? So then why didn't they do that on the plan in the first place?
And why did I have a 120 pound box scheduled to go on the 7000 shelf?
I don't get it.
 
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