Mueller report

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
The Spanish Flu got it's name because at the time Spain was the hardest hit with almost 9 million dying. Believed to have started in China.
OMG, who cares.

Completely irrelevant.

The ‘Spanish Flu’ got its name because Spain was the first country to admit that people were dying.

That ‘Spanish Flu’ started in Kansas.

The Spanish Flu got it's name because at the time Spain was the hardest hit with almost 9 million dying. Believed to have started in China.
No one knows where it started but almost everyone agrees it did not start in Spain. - OMJ

The 1918 “Spanish Flu” in Spain
The total numbers of persons who died of influenza in Spain were officially estimated to be 147,114 in 1918, 21,235 in 1919, and 17,825 in 1920. However, it is likely that >260,000 Spaniards died of influenza; 75% of these persons died during the second period of the epidemic, and 45% died during October 1918 alone. The Spanish population growth index was negative for 1918 (net loss, 83,121 persons).

Why Was It Called the 'Spanish Flu?
The 1918 influenza pandemic did not, as many people believed, originate in Spain.

While it’s unlikely that the “Spanish Flu” originated in Spain, scientists are still unsure of its source. France, China and Britain have all been suggested as the potential birthplace of the virus, as has the United States, where the first known case was reported at a military base in Kansas on March 11, 1918. Researchers have also conducted extensive studies on the remains of victims of the pandemic, but they have yet to discover why the strain that ravaged the world in 1918 was so lethal.

Spain was one of only a few major European countries to remain neutral during World War I. Unlike in the Allied and Central Powers nations, where wartime censors suppressed news of the flu to avoid affecting morale, the Spanish media was free to report on it in gory detail. News of the sickness first made headlines in Madrid in late-May 1918, and coverage only increased after the Spanish King Alfonso XIII came down with a nasty case a week later. Since nations undergoing a media blackout could only read in depth accounts from Spanish news sources, they naturally assumed that the country was the pandemic’s ground zero. The Spanish, meanwhile, believed the virus had spread to them from France, so they took to calling it the “French Flu.”
 
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DriveInDriveOut

Proud Deplorable
DisastrousDarkEland-max-1mb.gif
 

oldngray

nowhere special
No one knows where it started but almost everyone agrees it did not start in Spain. - OMJ

The 1918 “Spanish Flu” in Spain
The total numbers of persons who died of influenza in Spain were officially estimated to be 147,114 in 1918, 21,235 in 1919, and 17,825 in 1920. However, it is likely that >260,000 Spaniards died of influenza; 75% of these persons died during the second period of the epidemic, and 45% died during October 1918 alone. The Spanish population growth index was negative for 1918 (net loss, 83,121 persons).

Why Was It Called the 'Spanish Flu?
The 1918 influenza pandemic did not, as many people believed, originate in Spain.

While it’s unlikely that the “Spanish Flu” originated in Spain, scientists are still unsure of its source. France, China and Britain have all been suggested as the potential birthplace of the virus, as has the United States, where the first known case was reported at a military base in Kansas on March 11, 1918. Researchers have also conducted extensive studies on the remains of victims of the pandemic, but they have yet to discover why the strain that ravaged the world in 1918 was so lethal.

Spain was one of only a few major European countries to remain neutral during World War I. Unlike in the Allied and Central Powers nations, where wartime censors suppressed news of the flu to avoid affecting morale, the Spanish media was free to report on it in gory detail. News of the sickness first made headlines in Madrid in late-May 1918, and coverage only increased after the Spanish King Alfonso XIII came down with a nasty case a week later. Since nations undergoing a media blackout could only read in depth accounts from Spanish news sources, they naturally assumed that the country was the pandemic’s ground zero. The Spanish, meanwhile, believed the virus had spread to them from France, so they took to calling it the “French Flu.”

I heard one of the biggest factors in the spread of Spanish flu was when American soldiers starting going to Europe taking the virus back with them.
 

MrFedEx

Engorged Member
Snopes is always fun to read because they often put true at the top then bury the fact that it's false down in the page. I guess they know their lib audience is too stupid to read the whole thing.

Carry on!

Snopes has impeccable credentials. Too bad it uncovers so many Trump lie. Upset, fren. Take a Rasmussen Poll.
 

vantexan

Well-Known Member
No one knows where it started but almost everyone agrees it did not start in Spain. - OMJ

The 1918 “Spanish Flu” in Spain
The total numbers of persons who died of influenza in Spain were officially estimated to be 147,114 in 1918, 21,235 in 1919, and 17,825 in 1920. However, it is likely that >260,000 Spaniards died of influenza; 75% of these persons died during the second period of the epidemic, and 45% died during October 1918 alone. The Spanish population growth index was negative for 1918 (net loss, 83,121 persons).

Why Was It Called the 'Spanish Flu?
The 1918 influenza pandemic did not, as many people believed, originate in Spain.

While it’s unlikely that the “Spanish Flu” originated in Spain, scientists are still unsure of its source. France, China and Britain have all been suggested as the potential birthplace of the virus, as has the United States, where the first known case was reported at a military base in Kansas on March 11, 1918. Researchers have also conducted extensive studies on the remains of victims of the pandemic, but they have yet to discover why the strain that ravaged the world in 1918 was so lethal.

Spain was one of only a few major European countries to remain neutral during World War I. Unlike in the Allied and Central Powers nations, where wartime censors suppressed news of the flu to avoid affecting morale, the Spanish media was free to report on it in gory detail. News of the sickness first made headlines in Madrid in late-May 1918, and coverage only increased after the Spanish King Alfonso XIII came down with a nasty case a week later. Since nations undergoing a media blackout could only read in depth accounts from Spanish news sources, they naturally assumed that the country was the pandemic’s ground zero. The Spanish, meanwhile, believed the virus had spread to them from France, so they took to calling it the “French Flu.”
Worldwide estimates of up to 100,000,000. I've read soldiers brought it back from WWI battlegrounds and the problem in the States was exacerbated by the soldiers kept in barracks such as in Ft.Riley, KS where it exploded. The U.S. had around 675,000 dead but it was much worse elsewhere. I'd be surprised if your numbers on Spain are correct because from what I've read Spain got hit incredibly hard.
 
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