Express Doesn't know the actual weight of packages..?

Discussion in 'FedEx Discussions' started by alpha x, Nov 2, 2015.

  1. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    I complained to my manager about packages being mislabeled regarding their weight, because it is a safety concern. We often get very large, heavy, packages that are labeled "100lbs" but are clearly closer to 200lbs. Or some will be "149lbs" but they definitely seem heavier than 150 (which isn't supposed to be in the system, and we're not supposed to handle).

    I asked why FedEx didn't relabel the packages with the accurate weight once it went through our system, so that handlers and couriers could make safe choices in lifting them. He said that FedEx doesn't get the actual weight of every package... just the "DIM" weight, which could actually be off.

    So he said that if we suspect a package is over 150, we should leave it in the can so it can be weighed on the floor. Of course, our flow-co never actually weighs them because he's got his manager breathing down his neck about time management during sort. But this made me realize that it seems like FedEx is being pretty negligible in not getting (and or correcting) the actual weight of packages in the system.

    I suspect that they don't want to know if a package is actually over 150, because that would mean they have to turn it down and lose business. They'd probably rather have a 200lb package go through at a 150lb rate, than have to forfeit taking the package altogether..

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    Well you answered your own question. fedex doesn't care how much the package weighs, how do you think log splitters and futons get in the system.

    FedEx doesn't care, ups doesn't care it's all about pleasing the shipper. Wait until a week before Christmas when turned down ground volume gets redirected to us and we start getting treadmills and desks
     
  3. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    There's actually a surcharge for unauthorized shipments. Packages over 150lbs and beyond the size requirements that get delivered get an extra $60 or so charge on top of the regular shipping charge. They are talking about doubling that charge next year. So they have a strong incentive to catch those shipments and weigh them correctly.
     
  4. Brownslave688

    Brownslave688 You want a toe? I can get you a toe.

    Yeah but they don't bother to change the label.


    They get their money but who cares about the employee.
     
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  5. Holydriver

    Holydriver Active Member

    i dont know what the shipper is, but i pick up probably 5-10 per day at UPS store pick up that has 3lbs as the shipping weight. each package is probably 15lbs. not that 15lbs is heavy, but its inconvenient when you are expecting 3
     
  6. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    My thoughts are, it's a FedEx management problem and not mine. If it's over 150 lbs I leave it behind. Period.
     
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  7. Cactus

    Cactus Just telling it like it is

    As we should.
     
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  8. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    The point is, though, that there's no way to know if it is over 150lbs or not because they don't get an accurate weight on each package, and even when they do, they don't update the ASTRA label.
     
  9. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure an Express label won't show an over 150lb weight, because then it becomes Freight.

    You must be pretty new, because after you've been here a while, you can tell an over 150 because you can't even budge it.
     
  10. dex 84

    dex 84 Active Member

    This does bother me a little but at this point I'm pretty much over it. If it's too heavy I get help, whether it's lifting it out of the can or putting it into the truck. Then when I get to the stop I just push it out the door and drive away. If possible I park on an incline to make it even easier to push it out.

    One of the worst is those inversion tables for people with back problems. By the time I deliver the thing I'mgoing to need one of my own. And then the guy that delivers mine will need one...
     
  11. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    I've been around long enough to "know" that it's over 150... or at least pretty damn close. Problem is that without them having an accurate weight, there's no way to prove that it is over 150.
     
  12. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    You guys don't have a portable scale in your station?
     
  13. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    Regardless if the weight was on the label does anyone actually look at it?

    You see a treadmill come down the belt..guess I better check if the label has the proper weight...
     
  14. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    I check them if they're going in my truck, out of curiosity.
     
  15. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    A
    After a friend of mine hurt his back in the cans, and they blamed the fact that he wasn't following "proper safe handling and lifting procedures" which are impossible to follow while making flow, I started looking into all the details. I realized that you really do have to choose between making flow and following safety guidelines. Many instances are kind of small, but this issue of the weight of packages is a pretty big deal. We get a lot of heavy stuff (minimum 4-5 cans FULL of nothing but big heavy packages a day).

    It just blows my mind that they don't get an actual weight of every single package... it seems so basic and common sense. And without it, they're basically asking handlers and couriers to gamble with their backs.
     
  16. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    We've had multiple serious injuries just in the AM sort over the past year or so. One guy was knocked out cold by a 40lb package that fell from the top of the can onto the back of his head. Pallets with 1-200lb motors and such on them break apart while we're lifting them and fall on peoples' feet or shins. "Mechanical lift Only" packages being lifted by a 50 year old women. It's nuts, and everyone just keeps on as if it's normal and acceptable..
     
  17. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    That's why you guys have to stand your ground and work safely. If you get hurt, FedEx will kick you to the curb so fast it will make your head spin. The company pretends to love you until you get hurt....then you are a liability and will find out how little value you have to the company.
     
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  18. Turdferguson

    Turdferguson Guest

    One person tells you something and you take that as the undeniable truth?
    Maybe your station doesn't correct the weight ,but I find it hard to believe FedEx would turn down extra money for weight adjustments
     
  19. alpha x

    alpha x New Member

    Not "one person". A manager who has been managing (in different capacities) at FedEx for over 20 years.

    And if it's a choice between shipping the package at a discounted rate or not getting the business at all (by turning it away since nothing over 150lb is allowed in the system), I could see FedEx turning a blind eye to get the business.
     
  20. Operational needs

    Operational needs Well-Known Member

    We're actually supposed to correct the weights on packages. I stopped doing it years ago. Don't care enough anymore.
     
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