Do you guys think I’ll get fired?

FeederTheD

Active Member
Since I have yet to give a reply that’s on topic here we go: I think dispatch/sups/yard control/whoever is completely at fault. But they always are and are good at shoving the blame onto you. I think the best thing to do like someone said is take a picture of messages like that and then bounce your happy ass on out of there.
Someone who gets it lol As far as I know, that leg could’ve been delayed. I didn’t care at that point. If you tell me to go, I’m leaving lol like you said bounce my happy ass out the door lol
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
WOW.
The OP has a long, rocky road ahead.
Dispatchers and ORS's tend to have very long memories.

The OP may need to negotiate his ego if he intends to keep a job that some day will pay 100K.

Good luck.

EDIT: we never heard where the last leg went to?.....some podunk extended center 1-1.5 hours away or a hub/meet 4 hours away?
98% of the dispatchers I work with are cool with me. They know I come to work ready to run. I’m not used to shifting ALL DAY for 9/10 hours and then getting ready to run a route right after. Not to mention. I probably picked up 100 something empty pallets out of the trailers and swept them out to make empties. I was ready to go. Something I gotta get used to. I don’t care who that leg went to or what you guys think about me.
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
I look at it like he had one main job to do which was the legs in his board. Shifting is something to do to kill time in the middle of big time gaps or at the end of the day if you’re trying to get more money. They don’t NEED you to shift but they damn sure can’t tell a shifter to go run that leg for you. So he pretty much failed at his one job.
Well I also picked up about 100 something pallets while emptying trailers that night which I forgot to mention. I was dead at the end. Sue me.
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
I’ve never personally seen schedule updates while on shiftcom but that might be because I was explicitly told by dispatch to help out the yard so they left me alone.

Being a primarily local driver, I clock in with at least 10 “fake” legs that they will change throughout the day. I call those ghost legs. They are placeholders, nothing more. If that leg has a load in it, trailer number and all, then that is a direct order. I have clocked out, by direction, with some of those ghost legs still in my board. I delete them and clock out.

This guy, being so new, should be double checking before he leaves. I’ve had this exact run going on 5 years. I know how to run this run, dispatch knows I know how to run this run. He doesn’t have that luxury.
Well dispatch always told me to talk to them before I punch out. I thought dispatch was the one that sent me that message. Didn’t even know there was a such a thing called “yard control” until I made this post. They literally don’t tell you 💩 as a new driver. They just expect you to know everything soon as you walk in the door.
 

Cowboy Mac

Well-Known Member
Well I also picked up about 100 something pallets while emptying trailers that night which I forgot to mention. I was dead at the end. Sue me.
Yeah but why? I would have told them I can’t pick up pallets, I have a leg in my board I have to do. Which one would you rather do?
 

Cowboy Mac

Well-Known Member
Well dispatch always told me to talk to them before I punch out. I thought dispatch was the one that sent me that message. Didn’t even know there was a such a thing called “yard control” until I made this post. They literally don’t tell you 💩 as a new driver. They just expect you to know everything soon as you walk in the door.
It sounds like they are taking advantage of you not knowing how things work. Also sounds like lazy dispatch because if I had a leg to do and I was still on shiftcom, they would be calling my phone asking why I haven’t left yet.
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
Yeah but why? I would have told them I can’t pick up pallets, I have a leg in my board I have to do. Which one would you rather do?
They had me shifting in a brown truck. Every time you shift in a brown, we have to clean out the trailers before we bring them down the road to our empty lot. Stack empty pallets 16 high and put them on a pallet return trailer. The shifters in spotter trucks can’t go to that yard because it’s too far and apparently illegal from what I heard. So any shifter that gets put in a brown truck is stuck doing the harder labor. I would definitely rather run a load.
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
It sounds like they are taking advantage of you not knowing how things work. Also sounds like lazy dispatch because if I had a leg to do and I was still on shiftcom, they would be calling my phone asking why I haven’t left yet.
Yup I agree. I may be new to UPS but I’m definitely not a rookie. I won’t get taken advantage of.
 

Cowboy Mac

Well-Known Member
They had me shifting in a brown truck. Every time you shift in a brown, we have to clean out the trailers before we bring them down the road to our empty lot. Stack empty pallets 16 high and put them on a pallet return trailer. The shifters in spotter trucks can’t go to that yard because it’s too far and apparently illegal from what I heard. So any shifter that gets put in a brown truck is stuck doing the harder labor. I would definitely rather run a load.
That sucks. I’ve only ever shifted in a brown tractor, but here we have trailer sweepers whose only job is to sweep out the trailers we bring them, and move pallets and such. But they’re only here from like 9-5, so I end up sweeping out trailers quite a bit before CPUs or while shifting.

At the end of the day, we have AC and a radio so I’d rather be in a brown. And all our contact says about production numbers is “a fair days work for a fair days pay”. So you don’t have to kill yourself cleaning those trailers. Focus on “working safely”.
 

Trucker Clock

Well-Known Member
Yeah but why? I would have told them I can’t pick up pallets, I have a leg in my board I have to do. Which one would you rather do?

The leg in his board was to be run when he was done shifting. Probably just a hop to a close center and then back.

He unloaded pallets as he pulled an empty off the door, all through the night while he was shifting.

It sounds like they are taking advantage of you not knowing how things work.

Not really. He is supposed to clean out the trailers, as others are expected to do. Part of the job. He then had a leg at the end of his shift job that he knew about and told them he would do it before he even started shifting.

Also sounds like lazy dispatch because if I had a leg to do and I was still on shiftcom, they would be calling my phone asking why I haven’t left yet.

They would not be calling him. Dispatch knew he was shifting and would run the leg after he was done. Dispatch only questioned him after he clocked out with a leg still in his board. He never told them that he was too tired to run it. He just told dispatch that it was not his fault.

He was told, and knew to talk to dispatch, before he clocked out. He got a message on the IVIS and thought it was dispatch, so he clocked out with a leg in his board. He is new, so I'll cut him some slack. Maybe now he knows to physically talk to dispatch before he clocks out. And don't clock out with a leg still left in your board unless dispatch knows about it and says its OK.

My whole issue with him is his attitude for a 30 day driver who has been dying to get into UPS. Telling dispatch how it is going to be, not vice versa. Telling dispatch that it is not his fault. It's their problem to deal with. He's the one that clocked out with a leg still in his board.
 

FeederTheD

Active Member
The leg in his board was to be run when he was done shifting. Probably just a hop to a close center and then back.

He unloaded pallets as he pulled an empty off the door, all through the night while he was shifting.



Not really. He is supposed to clean out the trailers, as others are expected to do. Part of the job. He then had a leg at the end of his shift job that he knew about and told them he would do it before he even started shifting.



They would not be calling him. Dispatch knew he was shifting and would run the leg after he was done. Dispatch only questioned him after he clocked out with a leg still in his board. He never told them that he was too tired to run it. He just told dispatch that it was not his fault.

He was told, and knew to talk to dispatch, before he clocked out. He got a message on the IVIS and thought it was dispatch, so he clocked out with a leg in his board. He is new, so I'll cut him some slack. Maybe now he knows to physically talk to dispatch before he clocks out. And don't clock out with a leg still left in your board unless dispatch knows about it and says its OK.

My whole issue with him is his attitude for a 30 day driver who has been dying to get into UPS. Telling dispatch how it is going to be, not vice versa. Telling dispatch that it is not his fault. It's their problem to deal with. He's the one that clocked out with a leg still in his board.
I told them it wasn’t my fault and that I was tired too. Look man, both my kids had birthdays this week. I saw them both 10 mins in the morning and that was it. Today I’m missing their joint birthday parties because I’m dedicated to UPS. I’m not in the mood to keep arguing with you. I don’t care how you feel about me. Carry on.
 

Kingofthenorth

Well-Known Member
I’m a new driver, about 30 days in now. Yesterday, dispatch had me shifting for about 9 hours. They let me know before I got to work that I would be doing a load after I was done shifting. I agreed to come in. The leg wasn’t in my IVIS until about 5 hours after my shift started. The whole time I had it in the back of my mind that I’m going to run a load early in the morning after I’m done shifting. Which I didn’t have a problem with. By the time my 9th hour hits (3:30am), dispatch messages me on shift comm telling me “go ahead and call it a night cya.” Mind you, I was up for almost 24 hours so I was tired, thought nothing of it and punched out.

Soon as I got to the dispatch office to turn in my truck key, a girl in dispatch decides to call me out in front of everybody with an attitude and asks, “You know you still have a load on your board, right?” I told her, “dispatch messaged me on shift comm telling me to call it a night… that’s not my fault.”

Her and the other 2 dispatchers tell me that it’s my fault and my responsibility to look and see if I have another leg before punching out. I continued to tell them it’s not my fault and they kept telling me it was. I just kept on telling them it wasn’t my fault. Then one of them asked me what my name was and wrote it down on a piece of paper. As if he’s gunna complain to upper management about me. Got a feeling I’m gunna hear from a sup about this tomorrow.

I’ve been wanting to get into UPS for years and now that I’m finally in, I feel like I’m getting off on the wrong foot. I hate confrontation but refuse to let dispatch walk all over me. I’m afraid I might get let go because of this small altercation. What should I do? Wait and see how it plays out, or talk to a sup or the union? I don’t even know if I’m protected by the union all the way yet. I’m permanent full time, if that means anything. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

center manager told my union rep to walk me out of the building for integrity. I was asked to come in on preload and worked preload. He claimed I was lying/made the while thing up. Showed him texts proving it against union reps advice. He preceded to tell me I made up the texts and conspiracy conspiracy. Needless to say I worked the whole day and wondered why I am still at this company.
 

657 Magnum

Member
I’m a new driver, about 30 days in now. Yesterday, dispatch had me shifting for about 9 hours. They let me know before I got to work that I would be doing a load after I was done shifting. I agreed to come in. The leg wasn’t in my IVIS until about 5 hours after my shift started. The whole time I had it in the back of my mind that I’m going to run a load early in the morning after I’m done shifting. Which I didn’t have a problem with. By the time my 9th hour hits (3:30am), dispatch messages me on shift comm telling me “go ahead and call it a night cya.” Mind you, I was up for almost 24 hours so I was tired, thought nothing of it and punched out.

Soon as I got to the dispatch office to turn in my truck key, a girl in dispatch decides to call me out in front of everybody with an attitude and asks, “You know you still have a load on your board, right?” I told her, “dispatch messaged me on shift comm telling me to call it a night… that’s not my fault.”

Her and the other 2 dispatchers tell me that it’s my fault and my responsibility to look and see if I have another leg before punching out. I continued to tell them it’s not my fault and they kept telling me it was. I just kept on telling them it wasn’t my fault. Then one of them asked me what my name was and wrote it down on a piece of paper. As if he’s gunna complain to upper management about me. Got a feeling I’m gunna hear from a sup about this tomorrow.

I’ve been wanting to get into UPS for years and now that I’m finally in, I feel like I’m getting off on the wrong foot. I hate confrontation but refuse to let dispatch walk all over me. I’m afraid I might get let go because of this small altercation. What should I do? Wait and see how it plays out, or talk to a sup or the union? I don’t even know if I’m protected by the union all the way yet. I’m permanent full time, if that means anything. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
Sadly not thay easy to get rid of ya
 

Road Dog 56

Active Member
They can work you up to the legal limit unless you get sick sometime in shift or are too tired and feel unsafe.

I think I may have gone home early maybe 2-3 times in over 30 years as a truck driver. It's an excuse you can't make a habit of using.
 
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