Money for nothing...

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by roadrunner2012, Dec 30, 2013.

  1. roadrunner2012

    roadrunner2012 Four hours in the mod queue for a news link Troll

  2. moreluck

    moreluck golden ticket member

    I appreciate the qualifier!!
  3. roadrunner2012

    roadrunner2012 Four hours in the mod queue for a news link Troll

    Good to see we have inquisitive minds here at BC. The article is well worth a read.

    This is the closing statement:

    It has been said before. Our welfare state is out of date, based on a time in which men were the sole breadwinners and employees stayed with one company for their entire careers. Our pension system and unemployment protection programs are still centered around those lucky enough to have steady employment. Social security is based on the wrong premise that the economy creates enough jobs. Welfare programs have become pitfalls instead of trampolines.

    Never before has the time been so ripe to implement a universal and unconditional basic income. Our ageing societies are challenging us to keep the elderly economically active for as long as possible. An increasingly flexible labor market creates the need for more security. Globalization is eroding middle-class wages worldwide. Women’s emancipation will only be completed when a greater financial independence is possible for all. The deepening divide between the low- and highly educated means that the former are in need of extra support. The rise of robots and the increasing automatization of our economy could cost even those at the top of the ladder their jobs.

    Legend has it that while Henry Ford II was giving a tour around a new, fully automatic factory to union leader Walter Reuther in the 1960s, Ford joked:
    'Walter, how are you going to get those robots to pay your union dues?'

    Reuther is said to have replied:

    'Henry, how are you going to get them to buy your cars?'

    A world where wages no longer rise still needs consumers. In the last decades, middle-class purchasing power has been maintained through loans, loans and more loans. The Calvinistic reflex that you have to work for your money has turned into a license for inequality.

    No one is suggesting societies the world over should implement an expensive basic income system in one stroke. Each utopia needs to start small, with experiments that slowly turn our world upside down — like the one four years ago in the City of London. One of the aid workers later recalled: 'It’s quite hard to just change overnight the way you’ve always approached this problem. These pilots give us the opportunity to talk differently, think differently, describe the problem differently.'

    That is how all progress begins.