Questions about performance

Cloud

Well-Known Member
It really don't matter what their fake target numbers are as long as you do not hurt yourself and do it safely. Remember that is key.

Realistically:
Delivering packages I do about 20 stops/hr.
Loading package cars for preload, apparently I was doing 190 PPH.
Unloading trailers for twilight, no idea - probably in the 300 PPH realm.

But supervisors will always tell you a stupid unrealistic number.
"Oh you should be delivering 30 stops an hour"
"You should be loading 250 PPH for preload"
"Come on, pick up the pace for unloading we all are waiting to go home"

I don't give a flippin **** how long it's taking. It will get done...when it gets done.
 

PT Car Washer

Well-Known Member
It really don't matter what their fake target numbers are as long as you do not hurt yourself and do it safely. Remember that is key.

Realistically:
Delivering packages I do about 20 stops/hr.
Loading package cars for preload, apparently I was doing 190 PPH.
Unloading trailers for twilight, no idea - probably in the 300 PPH realm.

But supervisors will always tell you a stupid unrealistic number.
"Oh you should be delivering 30 stops an hour"
"You should be loading 250 PPH for preload"
"Come on, pick up the pace for unloading we all are waiting to go home"

I don't give a flippin **** how long it's taking. It will get done...when it gets done.
Been telling me for 40 years that I need to pick up the pace. Except when I ask for an optional day off. Then it is no we have no one to replace you.
 

OppsIJustLoadedMyPhone

Hub City Prisoner
Just go as fast as you can as safely as you.

Every door is different with regards to volume plus what if you're pulled to toss up E-REGS or cover pick off if someone is taking a piss or you're put into what's called a bag load?

Just be on time and try your best.
 

BadIdeaGuy

Sooner or later, you'll have to take a stand.
About to be a month at UPS for me, a part-time truck loader during the Twilight shift. Heard a lot of rough things about the job and sure as hell have experienced it, but still going strong.

I've heard a few different things from my supervisors about my loading speed though. I want to know what you guys consider a safe, reasonable packages per hour (pph). One supervisor when teaching me how to load told me that they aim for their loaders to reach a speed of 400pph. This number seemed way high but I heard it repeated a few times, and a few days ago another supervisor told me to reach for a 250pph speed. From you guys who have worked here longer than I have, what is reasonable? I hear a lot of people saying to not waste time trying to push yourself because they'll only put more on you (true from what I've seen so far, every time I work extra hard to finish all the packages on my rollers I get sent to another backed up truck constantly playing a game of catch up). I am determined to work hard for my pay, but don't want to be pushed around.
"The union does not recognize your production standards" is a fun way to end that sort of conversation.

Just make sure you hit seniority before you use that line.
 

BigBrownTown

Active Member
Are you union? Yes? Then don't worry about a PPH. Load safely, follow the methods, and don't destroy your body. A steady, safe pace comes with experience. If you are the fastest worker then you will likely be pushed to do the most and the hardest work. They'll see you as an opportunity to get out more volume in less time = more bang for their buck. It is their job to worry about numbers and your job to load boxes, within YOUR OWN limitations.

That being said you can be a good worker without loading like a maniac. Your body will thank you later.

If you feel that your management is trying to harass or coerce you concerning your speed then contact your steward and CHSP cochair. Tell the CHSP that you are being asked to work beyond your limitations and tell the steward you would like to file an article 37.

If you don't know what an article 37 is then get yourself a copy of the National Master Agreement.

Also look into other pt positions that you might prefer and be eligible for as you gain seniority as loading/unloading is strenuous in and of itself. Unless you find that you truly love loading.
 

BigBrownTown

Active Member
If he keeps asking you to push your limits you continue to work at a safe, steady pace and say, "I am doing my best." If he presses you with something along the lines of, "Well your best is not good enough." Then contact your steward either before or after your shift and explain the situation.
 

SunnyBro

Member
Also look into other pt positions that you might prefer and be eligible for as you gain seniority as loading/unloading is strenuous in and of itself. Unless you find that you truly love loading.
I've been interested in positions like sorting, small sort, or exploring other options. I don't know how challenging other positions are, but I find myself almost on a daily at one point or another nearing an internal stress overload about production, my wall integrity, the egress space, it gets to be more mentally than physically challenging for me a lot of the time. That said I still enjoy my job, I go there, do my work, and get paid.
 

RetiredIE

Retirement is VASTLY underrated
About to be a month at UPS for me, a part-time truck loader during the Twilight shift. Heard a lot of rough things about the job and sure as hell have experienced it, but still going strong.

I've heard a few different things from my supervisors about my loading speed though. I want to know what you guys consider a safe, reasonable packages per hour (pph). One supervisor when teaching me how to load told me that they aim for their loaders to reach a speed of 400pph. This number seemed way high but I heard it repeated a few times, and a few days ago another supervisor told me to reach for a 250pph speed. From you guys who have worked here longer than I have, what is reasonable? I hear a lot of people saying to not waste time trying to push yourself because they'll only put more on you (true from what I've seen so far, every time I work extra hard to finish all the packages on my rollers I get sent to another backed up truck constantly playing a game of catch up). I am determined to work hard for my pay, but don't want to be pushed around.
Of course their aim is 400pph. They all agreed to use that number because everyone laughed at them when they used to use 1000pph. Work hard, but work safely. Good luck!
 

toonertoo

Most Awesome Dog
Staff member
As I recall it depends on your position on the belt and how many cars you load, how many runbacks you have.. but I could be wrong
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
"The union does not recognize your production standards" is a fun way to end that sort of conversation.

Just make sure you hit seniority before you use that line.
So, the "funny" quote should be "The Union does not recognize your production standards....except during qualifying....".

So, in fact.....they are.
 

BadIdeaGuy

Sooner or later, you'll have to take a stand.
So, the "funny" quote should be "The Union does not recognize your production standards....except during qualifying....".

So, in fact.....they are.
Non seniority employees do not have union protection.

My statement stands with no qualifier.

The union does not recognize the company's production standards.
 

toonertoo

Most Awesome Dog
Staff member
I totally agree that the union does not recognize production numbers. But if the union is not strong at your building, you need to go above them. That is if you are truly being harrassed. If a "boss Im doing my best" doesnt work, then you may need to go above and beyond. This is where the issue lies. Knowing where to go. But in this period of time, I think the Im doing my best should work. And learn to grow a thick skin, its not your life, its what you do to live.
 

PPH_over_9000

Well-Known Member
@SunnyBro

The best way to handle PPH metrics is to not worry about them. That's your supervisor's job.

Rest assured, my PPH was never actually anywhere close to 9000. I put more effort into loading my trucks properly. Preload wants to cut hours despite increased volume? Oh well, I'm not gonna kill myself to make their plan work and neither should you (it's kind of ironic how that mentality of mine completely flipped when I became a driver, but that changed abruptly several weeks ago.) Work safely and with a sense of urgency, but they can't hold you to a production standard without giving you ammunition to use against them.

The cool thing about adopting this mentality? If you actually care about improving your job quality and load quality, speed will come with time. The trick is repeating proper loading methods over and over again until they become second-nature to you. Eventually you'll get to the point where you don't even have to think about what you're doing, you just do it while you keep your mind occupied with something else.

Since you're still trying to earn a permanent position, however, I've got a bit more advice for you. Screw everything I just said and hustle, hustle, hustle. PPH still doesn't matter, but you're going to want to keep your pull clean as a whistle and help others around you when you've got the opportunity. Depending on what kind of set-up your building runs (conveyor belts or otherwise) and where your pull is located, that's all easier said than done. I've only got experience with belts, and all I can tell you is that the closer to the bottom of the belt you are, the easier your job is going to be. If you're at the top of the belt, you want to focus on missing as few packages and getting your scan percentage as high as possible. If you're at the bottom, those two things are pretty much taken care of for you by the nature of your pull, so you want to focus on clearing the belt/rollers and loading as accurately as possible.

If you're still hung up on PPH, shoot for the god.damn moon. 300 or higher. Once you pass your probationary period, slow the hell down and start to talk to your drivers. Get a feel for if they even care how you load, and then adjust accordingly.

**ETA: Also, I'm not sure if they use those big crayons in your center to make you write PAL #'s on the packages. If so, I always found it easier to peel PAL labels and re-apply them to the outward-facing side as I walked into the trucks. It only works with the stickers and you might have to grow a fingernail a millimeter or two longer than you're used to, but it makes the job a piece of cake so long as you don't have 3-4 trucks that get absolutely destroyed day in and day out.
 
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