Hitting Unloading PPH

Drink Craft Beer

Well-Known Member
Where I'm at, unloaders are told that a full 100% should be done in an hour or less.

Yet the supes/center managers never take into consideration how many times the main belt stops, scanner's belt stops for label roll change or that the printer isn't working properly or the other 10+ things that could happen that slows the unload down.
 

Bastiatian

No mean tweets
Where I'm at, unloaders are told that a full 100% should be done in an hour or less.
"Let me see you do that, sir. Following the methods. Bend at the knees. Step and pivot, don't twist. Hand-to-surface. Ask for help with all over 70s.

I need training. Please help me. I'll hold your clipboard."
 

Bastiatian

No mean tweets
Thanks. You actually helped calm my nerves about Monday a lot. I'm just going to go in and focus on doing my best possible rate with placing the packages correctly and continue learning the best methods.
One more thing I'll recommend, is when the belt stops, grab a drink of water and prepare your area to continue working. Don't stand around.

I didn't normally stack the belt, but I stacked as many packages as I could as close as possible with the labels where I wanted them so when the belt started, I could unload them quickly.

You can also use this time to manage irregs.
 

Tanktoptony

Well-Known Member
20-25 ppm was what we based unloading on at our building. Eventually they only gave a crap about how long it took you to unload a trailer. Shorts were under 30min and long trailer or 53’ took an hour or less. But from what I hear now they are lucky to get long unloaded in under 2.5-3hrs. Get paid by the hour so do a 53’ in an hour that’s a $7 dollar trailer we used to say. As the state of hiring is now I don’t even know why they bother telling how many pph you need to do, they can’t get people to stay and try and make it sound like you aren’t cutting it is part of the problem, unloading might be the most physical job in building but it takes a few weeks to figure out how do it efficiently without getting injured, I did that crap for almost 16 years.
 

burrheadd

KING Of GIFS
Where I'm at, unloaders are told that a full 100% should be done in an hour or less.

Yet the supes/center managers never take into consideration how many times the main belt stops, scanner's belt stops for label roll change or that the printer isn't working properly or the other 10+ things that could happen that slows the unload down.
They know about each and everyone of those things
They are trying to get you to believe the nonsensical bull:censored2:
 

upser2020

Well-Known Member
We were told that standard at my orientation two years ago as well but I've never seen even a sup really push it. I've done a lot of doubles in unload and basically like has been said as long as ur trying ur probably good. That standard doesn't take into account what kinda trailer(hub load or customer) how much bulk what kind of packages etc.
 

1017Russia

Member
You'll get better. after your 30 days don't pay attention to these numbers.
You cannot be disciplined for this.
Yes you can be disciplined for not hitting planned pph, if ups can’t find a way to discipline you on paper they’ll simply cut your hours until you quit, 1200 pph isn’t hard if you follow the unload methods. I’m a supervisor, my best unloaders aren’t my strongest guys or even guys at all, my best unloaders are women who are under 130lbs. They are the fastest because they follow the methods. I’ve done enough write ups and documentation to know if you can’t flow 1200 per hour it’s probably due to performing one of the methods incorrectly. usually the reason a person can’t flow is because they are too busy trying to remove every bulk piece instead of moving them to one side until an inbound sweeper removes them, another reason is vhe adjustment, too often I catch guys with the extendo like 4 feet away from them so they either take Far too many steps to place packages on the extendo, or they are overreaching when trying to toss a package 4 feet away. The final reason people can’t flow is because they listen to people like you and they put a limit on their potential. By not performing to your best every single day you will become weaker and the job will get harder day by day, if you actually push yourself and treat the job like a workout it will get easy. My first week at ups I was flowing 17-1800 and I needed two sorters. Which is why I’m supervising now
 

1017Russia

Member
So I am a new employee at UPS and I have had two days of actual work where I am unloading packages from the trailers. We were told during orientation that the expected PPH for unloading was 1200. I am a young guy and I am in pretty good shape, but my first day I only hit 800 PPH and my second day I only hit around 850 with a max of 860. I am wondering if there are any specific methods people use to unload faster to the point they can hit 1200 PPH or if it just comes with more time on the job? Some of the trailers have really nice walls which make it easy to unload fast, but others have either poorly built walls or just packages that are much heavier that makes it seem almost impossible to be unloading a package every 3 seconds. Also, how strict are they usually about hitting their expected rate? If I don't get to 1200 PPH consistently by the end of my 30 days am I automatically fired? I'm really only doing this for a summer job while I'm home for college, but being able to work for 2-2.5 months would be nice instead of 30 days. Thanks in advance.
First things first, know your body’s limit, SAFETY IS KEY! if you don’t know your limits you can not safely push those limits The easiest way is to count in your head or out loud that way you know your exact flow and you’ll know how many packages you need to move quickly to catch up, rule of thumb one package every 3 seconds is 1200 hourly pph, make sure you aren’t taking out heavy bulk packages, sit them to one side of the trailer to maintain a safe passage out of the truck, I see a lot of guys tire themselves out in the first trailer because they move all the bulk instead of letting the sweeper move it, always remember the bulk crew does not unload trailers, don’t tire yourself out moving bulk always remember this, when you are finished with your trailer you’ll have to do another trailer, let the bulk sweepers move the bulk, save your strength for the next load. Ask your lead supervisor for a printout of the unload methods. Learn your methods! Study study study! Remember it’s a workout, but also remember what i said in the beginning, know your body’s limits and always put your safety before production numbers and remember these words “if you give minimal effort you won’t get any stronger, day by day you’ll start to feel more fatigued, if you give your absolute best everyday, you will become stronger and the job will get much easier” like the saying goes “no pain no gain” every day after work you should feel sore, if you don’t feel sore you aren’t getting stronger. Finally don’t do it for ups do it for yourself, if u can condition your body to make it in this job there’s no physical labor you can not do
 

1017Russia

Member
paying someone $10 to unload an entire semi truck , GEEZ THAT SOUNDS LIKE A GREAT JOB …DURR DURR IM A SUPERVISORS DURR DURR
🧔‍♂️✊
Supervisors don’t set the pay, I’m pretty sure that’s MUCH higher up the management chain, but seeing how you are a union employee and they dictate Union pay more than part time supervisors and leads.. maybe that’s where your issue lies. At the end of the day, when you applied for the job you knew what the pay was. If you don’t like to work just say that it’s not our issue 🤷🏿‍♂️ I will say this though, only rookies get paid minimum wage, if you put your time in to be able to complain the way you complain you should be making WAYYY more than minimum wage by now. So yes, it is a great idea to pay minimum wage a rookie who hasn’t put in any time to develop skill, might be a theft risk, costed X amount of money to train and hasn’t proven themselves. Seems like your understanding of how to run a business is limited but maybe that’s why you work hourly, make DURR DURR comments and eat crayons. Everyone ain’t built for business
 

Integrity

Binge Poster
Supervisors don’t set the pay, I’m pretty sure that’s MUCH higher up the management chain, but seeing how you are a union employee and they dictate Union pay more than part time supervisors and leads.. maybe that’s where your issue lies. At the end of the day, when you applied for the job you knew what the pay was. If you don’t like to work just say that it’s not our issue 🤷🏿‍♂️ I will say this though, only rookies get paid minimum wage, if you put your time in to be able to complain the way you complain you should be making WAYYY more than minimum wage by now. So yes, it is a great idea to pay minimum wage a rookie who hasn’t put in any time to develop skill, might be a theft risk, costed X amount of money to train and hasn’t proven themselves. Seems like your understanding of how to run a business is limited but maybe that’s why you work hourly, make DURR DURR comments and eat crayons. Everyone ain’t built for business
I was once a part-time supervisor in the unload.

Is that your position?
 

MECH-lift

Union Brother ✊🧔 RPCD
Supervisors don’t set the pay, I’m pretty sure that’s MUCH higher up the management chain, but seeing how you are a union employee and they dictate Union pay more than part time supervisors and leads.. maybe that’s where your issue lies. At the end of the day, when you applied for the job you knew what the pay was. If you don’t like to work just say that it’s not our issue 🤷🏿‍♂️ I will say this though, only rookies get paid minimum wage, if you put your time in to be able to complain the way you complain you should be making WAYYY more than minimum wage by now. So yes, it is a great idea to pay minimum wage a rookie who hasn’t put in any time to develop skill, might be a theft risk, costed X amount of money to train and hasn’t proven themselves. Seems like your understanding of how to run a business is limited but maybe that’s why you work hourly, make DURR DURR comments and eat crayons. Everyone ain’t built for business
Is that why the turnover rate is what it is?

You’re obviously another part time supervisor with no career ahead of you …you shoulda been a driver buddy 🤣

Is that your real picture?

You look like a clown 🤣
You’re not a rapper , you’re a supervisor 🤣🤣
🧔‍♂️✊
 

MECH-lift

Union Brother ✊🧔 RPCD
First things first, know your body’s limit, SAFETY IS KEY! if you don’t know your limits you can not safely push those limits The easiest way is to count in your head or out loud that way you know your exact flow and you’ll know how many packages you need to move quickly to catch up, rule of thumb one package every 3 seconds is 1200 hourly pph, make sure you aren’t taking out heavy bulk packages, sit them to one side of the trailer to maintain a safe passage out of the truck, I see a lot of guys tire themselves out in the first trailer because they move all the bulk instead of letting the sweeper move it, always remember the bulk crew does not unload trailers, don’t tire yourself out moving bulk always remember this, when you are finished with your trailer you’ll have to do another trailer, let the bulk sweepers move the bulk, save your strength for the next load. Ask your lead supervisor for a printout of the unload methods. Learn your methods! Study study study! Remember it’s a workout, but also remember what i said in the beginning, know your body’s limits and always put your safety before production numbers and remember these words “if you give minimal effort you won’t get any stronger, day by day you’ll start to feel more fatigued, if you give your absolute best everyday, you will become stronger and the job will get much easier” like the saying goes “no pain no gain” every day after work you should feel sore, if you don’t feel sore you aren’t getting stronger. Finally don’t do it for ups do it for yourself, if u can condition your body to make it in this job there’s no physical labor you can not do
How many years have you been at UPS ?
🧔‍♂️✊
 

burrheadd

KING Of GIFS
So I am a new employee at UPS and I have had two days of actual work where I am unloading packages from the trailers. We were told during orientation that the expected PPH for unloading was 1200. I am a young guy and I am in pretty good shape, but my first day I only hit 800 PPH and my second day I only hit around 850 with a max of 860. I am wondering if there are any specific methods people use to unload faster to the point they can hit 1200 PPH or if it just comes with more time on the job? Some of the trailers have really nice walls which make it easy to unload fast, but others have either poorly built walls or just packages that are much heavier that makes it seem almost impossible to be unloading a package every 3 seconds. Also, how strict are they usually about hitting their expected rate? If I don't get to 1200 PPH consistently by the end of my 30 days am I automatically fired? I'm really only doing this for a summer job while I'm home for college, but being able to work for 2-2.5 months would be nice instead of 30 days. Thanks in advance.

How good are you at throwing
 

Tanktoptony

Well-Known Member
20 boxes a minute is weak, but nowadays it’s not as easy to find unloaders willing to finish unloading a 53’ in less than an hour.
 
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