On-Time Departures in Feeder. Don't Watch The Clock

olroadbeech

Happy Verified UPSer
A big deal in the feeder dept. was on-time departures which were almost an impossibility at our hub.

main reasons were the previous drivers would not wash and clean out tractors nor would they post trip trailers.

So I would spend 15-20 minutes washing the tractor and time at the shop fixing stuff for out going trailers and tractors.

Management got onto to everyone to get out on time and ENCOURAGED drivers to do it no matter what. In a bizarro world the poor drivers were rewarded and the good drivers were harassed. Not unusual at UPS , I know.

My advice was to NOT watch the clock and do your job in the most professional way possible. Sure I was harassed for awhile but when they knew I wasn't gonna change , they left me alone.

Not sure what made me think of this after being retired for 4 years but I am proud of the fact that I did the job right.
 

Yeet

Inbound, turnaround, go to town
To quote a buddy of mine when I first came up, “UPS doesn’t pay you to be quick, they pay you to be safe.” I’ve held on to that ever since.
 

UpstateNYUPSer

Well-Known Member
If you knew that you would be spending 15-20 minutes getting the tractor ready to go, why wouldn't you start the process while the trailer was still being loaded? You would then be all set to hookup and pull on time.
 

Johney

Well-Known Member
If you knew that you would be spending 15-20 minutes getting the tractor ready to go, why wouldn't you start the process while the trailer was still being loaded? You would then be all set to hookup and pull on time.
What if the trailer is already to go when you get there?
 

raceanoncr

Well-Known Member
Did that here, too. With door open and still being loaded, "Big Kahuna" came over and asked what my pull time was. "Whenever they close the door and I leave". He yelled, "You HAVE to know your pull time!!!!" I repeated, "Whenever they close the door and I leave". Not very happy.
 

UpstateNYUPSer

Well-Known Member
Did that here, too. With door open and still being loaded, "Big Kahuna" came over and asked what my pull time was. "Whenever they close the door and I leave". He yelled, "You HAVE to know your pull time!!!!" I repeated, "Whenever they close the door and I leave". Not very happy.
So, following his "logic", if your pull time was 2200 you would be well within your rights to pull at 2200, whether it was safe to do so or not.
 

Johney

Well-Known Member
So, following his "logic", if your pull time was 2200 you would be well within your rights to pull at 2200, whether it was safe to do so or not.
No what he's saying is you can't leave until the door is closed, whether it's safe to or not.If you have to bring the trailer to automotive you can't until it's loaded and sealed.
 

UpstateNYUPSer

Well-Known Member
No what he's saying is you can't leave until the door is closed, whether it's safe to or not.If you have to bring the trailer to automotive you can't until it's loaded and sealed.
In our smaller center the mechanic would perform any needed repairs, if possible, while the trailer is still being loaded, thus negating any delay in pull time. If this was not possible we would pull the trailer around and they would work as quickly (and safely) as possible to perform the repairs, especially if those involved the lights on the rear of the trailer.
 

Indecisi0n

Well-Known Member
I never worried about pull times . Half the time I don't even know what my pull time is . I leave when the trailer is ready. What else am I going to do? Most times as I am standing behind the trailer a sup will ask me, "what's your pull time" which I reply " I don't know". I get a odd look from them. I say if I tell you it's soon does that make you work any differently?
 

RolloTony Brown Town

Well-Known Member
Departing on time is important but only possible when the hub or local sort shuts the door.

Just check the schedule edit if asked....

Every time a load leaves late everyone wants to point the finger at the driver. I’ve met hundreds of drivers... most of them are ready to go and waiting for the hub to wrap up.

Most of the time the hub doesn’t have their :censored2: together so it’s going to be late.
 

olroadbeech

Happy Verified UPSer
Departing on time is important but only possible when the hub or local sort shuts the door.

Just check the schedule edit if asked....

Every time a load leaves late everyone wants to point the finger at the driver. I’ve met hundreds of drivers... most of them are ready to go and waiting for the hub to wrap up.

Most of the time the hub doesn’t have their :censored2: together so it’s going to be late.
damn straight. on a snow night you can be sure we wanted to get out on time. frustrating when they would hold us up. those snow nights were long nights , chaining up both ways on Donner Pass. trying not to run out of hours, etc.

don't miss that.
 

Boywondr

The truth never changes.
In our smaller center the mechanic would perform any needed repairs, if possible, while the trailer is still being loaded, thus negating any delay in pull time. If this was not possible we would pull the trailer around and they would work as quickly (and safely) as possible to perform the repairs, especially if those involved the lights on the rear of the trailer.
What do you mean "we"? Did you drive feeders?

Any light out is a DOT infraction, not just the rear ones rookie.
 

UpstateNYUPSer

Well-Known Member
What do you mean "we"? Did you drive feeders?

Any light out is a DOT infraction, not just the rear ones rookie.
The mechanic can work on any part of the trailer NOT PARKED AGAINST THE DOCK while it is still being loaded. Any work that has to be done ONCE THE TRAILER HAS BEEN PULLED must be done at the shop.
 
Top