PT for 15 years and need help with pension

I apologize that this doesnt seem like to the correct section to post this, but the more relevant sections look like they have much less traffic.

From September 2001 until January 2017 I worked PT as a preloader at the Norwood, MA UPS building. I was in the Teamsters Local 25 while I was there. I was there between the ages of 21 and 35 and now I'm 41, and I admit that I was young and stupid and didnt pay attention to the pension. As far as I know, there was no enrollment process and it was noncontributory, so I assume that means that I was considered to be automatically enrolled in the pension plan, but I'm not sure. It appears that I had to work atleast 5 years with atleast 750 hours per year to be elgible for the plan. I definately worked more then 5 years and I dont have the hours worked on hand, but my attendance was good and I probably worked somewhere around 950-1000 hours per year.

So I know it was stupid of me to ignore the pension for so many years, but I guess ignorance is kinda par for the course when your young. As long as I am elgible for the pension then based on what some other people have said about themselves then it looks like I would receive somewhere around $900 or so per month at the normal retirement age. I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension?
-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory?
-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc?
 
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UnionStrong

Doesn’t play well with others…
I apologize that this doesnt seem like to the correct section to post this, but the more relevant sections look like they have much less traffic.

From September 2001 until January 2017 I worked PT as a preloader at the Norwood, MA UPS building. I was in the Teamsters Local 25 while I was there. I was there between the ages of 21 and 35 and now I'm 41, and I admit that I was young and stupid and didnt pay attention to the pension. As far as I know, there was no enrollment process and it was noncontributory, so I assume that means that I was considered to be automatically enrolled in the pension plan, but I'm not sure. It appears that I had to work atleast 5 years with atleast 750 hours per year to be elgible for the plan. I definately worked more then 5 years and I dont have the hours worked on hand, but my attendance was good and I probably worked somewhere around 950-1000 hours per year.

So I know it was stupid of me to ignore the pension for so many years, but I guess ignorance is kinda par for the course when your young. As long as I am elgible for the pension then based on what some other people have said about themselves then it looks like I would receive somewhere around $900 or so per month at the normal retirement age. I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension?
-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory?
-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc?
You were in the union, you paid dues, you were in the pension plan, automatically. Call the local for info or call the new England teamsters pension fund in Worcester. Did you take a withdrawal card when you quit?
 

Brownwind

Well-Known Member
I apologize that this doesnt seem like to the correct section to post this, but the more relevant sections look like they have much less traffic.

From September 2001 until January 2017 I worked PT as a preloader at the Norwood, MA UPS building. I was in the Teamsters Local 25 while I was there. I was there between the ages of 21 and 35 and now I'm 41, and I admit that I was young and stupid and didnt pay attention to the pension. As far as I know, there was no enrollment process and it was noncontributory, so I assume that means that I was considered to be automatically enrolled in the pension plan, but I'm not sure. It appears that I had to work atleast 5 years with atleast 750 hours per year to be elgible for the plan. I definately worked more then 5 years and I dont have the hours worked on hand, but my attendance was good and I probably worked somewhere around 950-1000 hours per year.

So I know it was stupid of me to ignore the pension for so many years, but I guess ignorance is kinda par for the course when your young. As long as I am elgible for the pension then based on what some other people have said about themselves then it looks like I would receive somewhere around $900 or so per month at the normal retirement age. I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension?
-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory?
-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc?
You should be good when you hit the full retirement age. In the North East it might be different but a good idea to call the pension office. I m sorry but I can’t help with the number to call.
 
I apologize that this doesnt seem like to the correct section to post this, but the more relevant sections look like they have much less traffic.

From September 2001 until January 2017 I worked PT as a preloader at the Norwood, MA UPS building. I was in the Teamsters Local 25 while I was there. I was there between the ages of 21 and 35 and now I'm 41, and I admit that I was young and stupid and didnt pay attention to the pension. As far as I know, there was no enrollment process and it was noncontributory, so I assume that means that I was considered to be automatically enrolled in the pension plan, but I'm not sure. It appears that I had to work atleast 5 years with atleast 750 hours per year to be elgible for the plan. I definately worked more then 5 years and I dont have the hours worked on hand, but my attendance was good and I probably worked somewhere around 950-1000 hours per year.

So I know it was stupid of me to ignore the pension for so many years, but I guess ignorance is kinda par for the course when your young. As long as I am elgible for the pension then based on what some other people have said about themselves then it looks like I would receive somewhere around $900 or so per month at the normal retirement age. I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension?
-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory?
-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc?
You're way too young to collect a pension
 

hondo

promoted to mediocrity
@brownkonsole :
... I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month >Much of what you read on here applies to the Company's Plan ( for part-time employees). I'm pretty sure your benefits would come from the : New England Teamsters & Trucking Industry Pension Fund

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension? >Should be a Yes, no action needed by you.

-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory? >Yes

-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc? >link: New England Teamsters & Trucking Industry Pension Fund – NETTIPF It looks like you will need to contact them to verify you are covered by that Fund, and register/receive a 'member ID' & password.
 
You were in the union, you paid dues, you were in the pension plan, automatically. Call the local for info or call the new England teamsters pension fund in Worcester. Did you take a withdrawal card when you quit?
No I didnt take a withdrawal card when I quit in January 2017. I had no idea what that was until you mentioned it. I just looked into it briefly and it appears that its a way to keep an inactive membership in the union after departing from the union job and when a new job is acquired in the same union then you dont need to pay the initial union fees again.

Is that correct?

Does not having a withdrawal card affect my ability to receive the pension a few decades after leaving the union job?

I can't imagine that it would be required to continue to be an active or inactive member of the union 30 years after leaving the union job, to receive the pension. Also, the reason I left UPS was because we moved from Boston to Western PA, so if I was to get a teamsters job again it likely wouldnt be in Local 25, so unless I'm mistaken it seems like the withdrawal card wouldnt do me any good. In Boston I was in Local 25, but out near Pittsburgh I have no idea what the local is around here. Wouldnt the withdrawal card have held my membership in Local 25 only, or would it have held my membership in the Teamsters as a whole?
 
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JustDeliverIt

Well-Known Member
No I didnt take a withdrawal card when I quit in January 2017. I had no idea what that was until you mentioned it. I just looked into it briefly and it appears that its a way to keep an inactive membership in the union after departing from the union job and when a new job is acquired in the same union then you dont need to pay the initial union fees again.

Is that correct?

Does not having a withdrawal card affect my ability to receive the pension a few decades after leaving the union job?

I can't imagine that it would be required to continue to be an active or inactive member of the union, 30 years after leaving the union job, to receive the pension. Also, the reason I left UPS was because we moved from Boston to Western PA. In Boston I was in Local 25, but out near Pittsburgh I have no idea what the local is around here. Wouldnt the withdrawal card have help my membership in Local 25 only, or would it have held my members in the Teamsters period?

Withdrawal card is only if you return to a job with the same union.

As for your pension you should call your pension office, the local you worked under will be able to give it to you. I would contact them for any info.

But you are correct, you will receive a pension payout at retirement age (requirements vary in different regions so that’s why contacting your local with give you the exact answers you want).
 

UnionStrong

Doesn’t play well with others…
No I didnt take a withdrawal card when I quit in January 2017. I had no idea what that was until you mentioned it. I just looked into it briefly and it appears that its a way to keep an inactive membership in the union after departing from the union job and when a new job is acquired in the same union then you dont need to pay the initial union fees again.

Is that correct?

Does not having a withdrawal card affect my ability to receive the pension a few decades after leaving the union job?

I can't imagine that it would be required to continue to be an active or inactive member of the union 30 years after leaving the union job, to receive the pension. Also, the reason I left UPS was because we moved from Boston to Western PA, so if I was to get a teamsters job again it likely wouldnt be in Local 25, so unless I'm mistaken it seems like the withdrawal card wouldnt do me any good. In Boston I was in Local 25, but out near Pittsburgh I have no idea what the local is around here. Wouldnt the withdrawal card have held my membership in Local 25 only, or would it have held my membership in the Teamsters as a whole?
It keeps you from owing back dues, which can be deducted from your pension and keep accruing.
 
It keeps you from owing back dues, which can be deducted from your pension and keep accruing.
I should have looked into this, and I'll make sure I call the union office asap, but I assume that as soon as I terminate my employment at the UPS building and stop paying union dues, is the union then notified that my union membership is also terminated, or is the union made ware of my union membership ending some other way?

I wonder if the union might still think I am a union member 5+ years after quitting UPS, and like you said they might still be expecting dues, and possibly take those back dues out of my pension, even though I'm probably decades away from taking the pension?
 

BigUnionGuy

Got the T-Shirt
I should have looked into this, and I'll make sure I call the union office asap, but I assume that as soon as I terminate my employment at the UPS building and stop paying union dues, is the union then notified that my union membership is also terminated, or is the union made ware of my union membership ending some other way?

I wonder if the union might still think I am a union member 5+ years after quitting UPS, and like you said they might still be expecting dues, and possibly take those back dues out of my pension, even though I'm probably decades away from taking the pension?

If you are vested in a pension plan.... you should be receiving notifications on funding status.

Does your (former) Local or pension plan have your current address ?
 

Big Babooba

Well-Known Member
You can contact the New England Teamsters and Trucking Industry Pension Fund. You might be able to get the info you want at NETTIPF.COM. You will have to register. You can also call then at (781) 345-4400
 

UnionStrong

Doesn’t play well with others…
I should have looked into this, and I'll make sure I call the union office asap, but I assume that as soon as I terminate my employment at the UPS building and stop paying union dues, is the union then notified that my union membership is also terminated, or is the union made ware of my union membership ending some other way?

I wonder if the union might still think I am a union member 5+ years after quitting UPS, and like you said they might still be expecting dues, and possibly take those back dues out of my pension, even though I'm probably decades away from taking the pension?
To my knowledge, if you quit UPS, you must take a withdrawal card from the union to stop dues from accruing.
 

Baba gounj

Strength through joy
You were in the union, you paid dues, you were in the pension plan, automatically. Call the local for info or call the new England teamsters pension fund in Worcester. Did you take a withdrawal card when you quit?
The Pension Fund is located in Burlington MA. @ 1 Wall Street, 01803.
800-447-7709 ( Toll Free )
Yes , you should register at NETTIPF.COM
Once you are on, then you can check all the hours you worked per year.
And it will list how any months of Pension Credit you have.
( 1800 hrs = a full year's credit, 0-250 = nothing, all other hours worked = between 2 & 11 months of credit )
They have a guide to guess what your pension payments will be when you reach retirement age.

The withdrawal card is worth its weight in gold ( Costs around a buck ).
I got mine when I retired.
Because no one really knows what lies ahead.
 

UnionStrong

Doesn’t play well with others…
The Pension Fund is located in Burlington MA. @ 1 Wall Street, 01803.
800-447-7709 ( Toll Free )
Yes , you should register at NETTIPF.COM
Once you are on, then you can check all the hours you worked per year.
And it will list how any months of Pension Credit you have.
( 1800 hrs = a full year's credit, 0-250 = nothing, all other hours worked = between 2 & 11 months of credit )
They have a guide to guess what your pension payments will be when you reach retirement age.

The withdrawal card is worth its weight in gold ( Costs around a buck ).
I got mine when I retired.
Because no one really knows what lies ahead.
I forgot the address. For some reason I thought Worcester. That’s my fund too. Lol
 
To my knowledge, if you quit UPS, you must take a withdrawal card from the union to stop dues from accruing.
Are you sure the union dues accrue even if I quit the job and dont ever plan on returning to a job in the same union?

From what I've read the withdrawal card will stop union dues from being paid or accruing but only for people that plan on returning to a job in the same union. Its not likely that I would return to a job in the Teamsters union both because I just doubt I will get another job thats in that union, but also because we moved from the Boston area to the Pittsburgh area and I imagine I am no longer in the Local 25's region.

I got an account on nettipf.com, and it says that I have a vested right to a pension from the fund based on my hours and total pension credit of 9 years 5 months. I was there for 15 years, and I wonder if my quitting 5 years ago and not taking the withdrawal card then is the reason that my total pension credit is 9 years 5 months instead of about 15 years?

Or does my total pension credit being about 5 years less then the years I worked there have something to do with vesting only starting after 5 years or something like that?

SCRATCH WHAT I SAID... I just learned about how a full year pension credit appears to be 1800 hours? So I have over 17k hours worked, and 17k divided by 1800 = about 9.5, which it appears is how the 9.5 is being calculated.

Whatever it is I think I need to call the pension office to get more information.
 
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nancyg

Active Member
I apologize that this doesnt seem like to the correct section to post this, but the more relevant sections look like they have much less traffic.

From September 2001 until January 2017 I worked PT as a preloader at the Norwood, MA UPS building. I was in the Teamsters Local 25 while I was there. I was there between the ages of 21 and 35 and now I'm 41, and I admit that I was young and stupid and didnt pay attention to the pension. As far as I know, there was no enrollment process and it was noncontributory, so I assume that means that I was considered to be automatically enrolled in the pension plan, but I'm not sure. It appears that I had to work atleast 5 years with atleast 750 hours per year to be elgible for the plan. I definately worked more then 5 years and I dont have the hours worked on hand, but my attendance was good and I probably worked somewhere around 950-1000 hours per year.

So I know it was stupid of me to ignore the pension for so many years, but I guess ignorance is kinda par for the course when your young. As long as I am elgible for the pension then based on what some other people have said about themselves then it looks like I would receive somewhere around $900 or so per month at the normal retirement age. I've read that its around $55-60 per month per year worked. So ~$57 x 15 years = $855 per month

-Am I correct in assuming that I was automatically enrolled in the pension?
-Am I correct in assuming that it was noncontributory?
-Where should I go to find out my specific pension information, like the number of hours/years worked that affects the value of my pension, and what I can expect to receive when taking the pension at certain ages, etc?
I worked 14 years for ups local 25 and I have retired at age 64 with a pension of 1708 per month.
 

Baba gounj

Strength through joy
Are you sure the union dues accrue even if I quit the job and dont ever plan on returning to a job in the same union?

From what I've read the withdrawal card will stop union dues from being paid or accruing but only for people that plan on returning to a job in the same union. Its not likely that I would return to a job in the Teamsters union both because I just doubt I will get another job thats in that union, but also because we moved from the Boston area to the Pittsburgh area and I imagine I am no longer in the Local 25's region.

I got an account on nettipf.com, and it says that I have a vested right to a pension from the fund based on my hours and total pension credit of 9 years 5 months. I was there for 15 years, and I wonder if my quitting 5 years ago and not taking the withdrawal card then is the reason that my total pension credit is 9 years 5 months instead of about 15 years?

Or does my total pension credit being about 5 years less then the years I worked there have something to do with vesting only starting after 5 years or something like that?

SCRATCH WHAT I SAID... I just learned about how a full year pension credit appears to be 1800 hours? So I have over 17k hours worked, and 17k divided by 1800 = about 9.5, which it appears is how the 9.5 is being calculated.

Whatever it is I think I need to call the pension office to get more information.
As I have already stated pension credits are given based on hours worked in a single year.
You have only acquired 9 yrs & 5 months during your employment.
The two ways to get 15 years credit are if you were employed as a full time employee during your employment.
The only other way is to work 35 hours for 52 weeks as a part timer.
{ That is what I was doing before going FT ) { I worked Saturdays during my vacation weeks to help with the count }

The withdrawal card has nothing with paying dues.
Except that in order to get the card, one has to have paid dues for that month.
It is to used if you were to get another Teamster Job to waive the initiation fees.
 
I worked 14 years for ups local 25 and I have retired at age 64 with a pension of 1708 per month.
Is that 14 full time or part time years, or is it 14 pension credit years?

I spoke to a woman at the pension office, and I suspect there was a misunderstanding because she claimed that my monthly pension at 64 would be around $2,300. I dont know whether she was calculating that based the assumption that I was continuously working part time until 64 or what. She could see my hours and years worked and saw that there was nothing after 2017, so I dont know how she got that number. I'm trying to call again to see if there was a misunderstanding.
 
I think its important to address some of the comments to clear up the confusion. I'm not an expert on this by any means, but after contacting the pension office and the union office I think I have a good idea whats going on.

Leaving a job in the Teamsters union without taking a withdrawal card means that you are basically put on suspended status in the union, and then you just basically have to start over in the union and pay the $500 or so in "initiation" dues, but only if and when you go back to a job in the Teamsters union. Not having a withdrawal card does NOT mean that union dues will continue to accrue from the start of the time you leave the union job, which also means that dues will NOT continue to accrue and so will not then get withdrawn from your pension. If you ever plan on going back to a job in the Teamsters union then it makes sense to get a withdrawal card to avoid repaying the initiation dues, but if you dont plan on going back to a Teamsters union job, or just for whatever reason didnt get a withdrawal card then its not assumed that you are still active in the union and owe back dues from the time you left the job. The person I spoke to at the union office said that if I was still working at the union job and WASNT paying union dues then that is a situation where back dues would be owed, but once I left the union job it appears that it was assumed that my status in the union was put on suspension and dues where then discontinued. From what I understand after talking to the pension office, any pension credit that you receive is yours and cannot be affected by any union dues that you may owe.
 
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