Training

Discussion in 'FedEx Discussions' started by Purplepackage, Aug 7, 2016.

  1. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    Anybody else seem to have a training budget back at their station?

    We are actually giving guys 3 days to an entire week of training on routes, it's been years since I've seen that lol
     
  2. One transfer at my station, who was a vetted 15 year service employee, was on ride-along training for a WHOLE month learning the area, (total training overkill!!)

    Once that courier finally ran by themselves, did more sending help messages every 20 minutes rather than actually making delivering or picking up. That pathetic courier accrued a stack of performance reminders, multiple DOT Hour of Service violations, and brought back lots of DEX1s(didn't even attempt), Senior Manager took her ID badge and shown the door.
     
  3. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    That amount of training is unheard of, when you train on a route with me your in the passenger seat 1 day and the rest of the time your running the route and I'm just there for support, you either get it or you don't
     
  4. Express Courier

    Express Courier Active Member

    My training back in the day was to ride with a swing courier one day on some random route.
     
  5. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    My initial training was 3 days. Day 1 I sat in the jump seat all day. Day 2 I sat in the jump seat until lunch. Day 3 I drove while the on car sat in the jump seat.

    I can still remember near the end of Day 1 we approached an intersection and my on-car asked me if we should turn left or right. I had absolutely no idea. He laughed his butt off while turning left.
     
  6. My training after transferring to new station was a one day jumpseat ass-hardening learning day with a swing for the 4 routes I cover on my 4x10 wheel. Then the next solo day(s) was given keys, a copy-off of mapbook pages to highlight, and a last "Good Luck" from my manager. My first day solos were good days to learn on how to "survive and adapt."

    Whatever happened to those days of hiring self-subsistent and reliable employees? This never happens to newbies these days.
     
  7. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    Newbies are coddled here as well.

    We had a driver in his 30 day packet give his notice on Friday. He was being sent out with roughly 80% of the work that the training route normally goes out with and was struggling. I was sent to help him a couple of times. The "sense of urgency" just was not there.
     
  8. whenIgetthere

    whenIgetthere Well-Known Member

    When I transferred to my new station, was supposed to get three days training on my route. Didn't get any. As a transfer, wasn't a problem, since I can read a map. When I became a swing in that station, never got a day of training. Now I see newbies getting weeks of training. Heard about one newbie on a PUP route (easy route, did it many times), trained on the route for four weeks, and quit after two days on her own.
     
  9. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    We always tried to give 3 days, normally with a swing doing the training. Every time I train someone they drive because I don't know your supposed to learn if you aren't driving it
     
  10. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    I found it much easier to take it all in on the first day if I didn't have to worry about driving; however, since I wasn't driving, I wasn't keeping track of how we got there and where we went next.
     
  11. Purplepackage

    Purplepackage Well-Known Member

    I agree, on the first day it's better to just absorb the area but any day after that I feel you need to drive it yourself, I won't be driving for you when you're out there alone so why would I do it for you now
     
  12. UpstateNYUPSer

    UpstateNYUPSer Very proud grandfather.

    The hardest part can be figuring out where the delivery points are.
     
  13. El Morado Diablo

    El Morado Diablo Active Member

    Our station, like many others, has had troubles staying fully staffed over the years. They've put a lot of effort into trying to stay ahead of the staffing problems by over-hiring the past couple of years. Most days we have more people than we need. New hires and transfers are spending 2-4 weeks training on routes. I think they are doing it to make sure they work for their guaranteed hours instead of sending them home with guarantee pay.

    The thing I've noticed is that all the extra time training on a route doesn't seem to improve their performance once they do it on their own. We've had to have them do more ride alongs after failing on their own to work on route knowledge and procedures.

    I'm not sure how much longer this will last in our station. Too many people are talking about leaving due to pay, lack of hours, etc.
     
  14. TheJackal

    TheJackal Active Member

    IF the route is DRA, you shouldn't need more than 1 day. If it's not, 2-3 days should suffice.

    When I started, I got 1 day on my pickup route. 0 days when I got my AM route. When I moved down south, I was the passenger the 1st day, drove the second and asked the manager to go out on my own the third, because I won't learn anything riding with someone else. This was a 350 mile/day, out in the boonies, dirty back roads route.
     
  15. McFeely

    McFeely Huge Member

    We were overstaffed for the last 8 months or so. Just had 4 resignations in the last couple of weeks. Now we're back to everybody working their scheduled days off.
     
  16. MrFedEx

    MrFedEx Engorged Member

    What I see is new people training even newer people. In other words, the blind leading the blind.
     
  17. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Active Member

    Managed by the incompetent....
     
  18. dezguy

    dezguy Well-Known Member

    I can confirm this. We recently had a new hire go out with a girl with less than a month in. Absolute stupidity.
     
  19. MrFedEx

    MrFedEx Engorged Member

    It's pretty bad. As soon as their cell phones go dead in the afternoon, they're completely lost because they no longer have turn by turn guidance.

    Utterly pathetic.
     
  20. Browntown2014

    Browntown2014 Active Member

    What a wonderful story dude.