Amazon is building its own carbon-neutral UPS, Bank of America says

oldngray

nowhere special
Amazon hasn't had enough press releases recently. They must have felt they needed a bump in their stock price.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
Fed-ex drew the line in the sand.

Will our current UPS leadership continue to bow to the almighty Amazon for a few years of profits and sink the tightest ship?

Or will we cut them off before they cut us out?
 

Rack em

First to worst!
Fed-ex drew the line in the sand.

Will our current UPS leadership continue to bow to the almighty Amazon for a few years of profits and sink the tightest ship?

Or will we cut them off before they cut us out?
We have them by the balls right now! We can charge them FULL price for ALL packages now or dump them right before peak. Imagine how many people would be pissed off when amazon and the post office ruin Christmas. Of course our fearFULL leaders won't take action against amazon until it's too late.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
Yep
It is all about the current quarter's numbers.

Meanwhile they build infrastructure to rival ours, and we facilitate them.

Reminds me of Lenin's quote...
“The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them.”
 

OKLABob

Well-Known Member
What are the chances they really put us out? I’ve heard rumors for awhile now but never really thought about it much.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
What are the chances they really put us out? I’ve heard rumors for awhile now but never really thought about it much.
All other competitors were hampered by the enormous cost of building the infrastructure (planes, trucks, buildings).

Amazon has shown it is willing to sustain many years of losses in one section of it's empire in order to grow to be the biggest player in the sector.

They have the money. Eventually they themselves will be moving the vast majority of what they sell.

They will then need to move other company's goods to make their distribution network profitable....Business to Businesses delivery.

Until then, they have an advantage that Fed-ex did not enjoy...they sell the product to be shipped.

My guess, and only that a guess, is they will move an equal amount of boxes as us by 2030. Then their low labor costs put us under by 2040.
 

Package Stick

"Send it."
I talked to a revenue recovery supervisor in regards to Amazon and incomps (they're not operations, really do f*** all).

He said we charge them $18 every time an incomp has "extra" handling.
 

Rack em

First to worst!
All other competitors were hampered by the enormous cost of building the infrastructure (planes, trucks, buildings).

Amazon has shown it is willing to sustain many years of losses in one section of it's empire in order to grow to be the biggest player in the sector.

They have the money. Eventually they themselves will be moving the vast majority of what they sell.

They will then need to move other company's goods to make their distribution network profitable....Business to Businesses delivery.

Until then, they have an advantage that Fed-ex did not enjoy...they sell the product to be shipped.

My guess, and only that a guess, is they will move an equal amount of boxes as us by 2030. Then their low labor costs put us under by 2040.
I agree but would drop those numbers to around 2025 and 2035. They are growing exponentially every single year and no signs of them slowing down or people shopping elsewhere.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
Amazon is looking forward to cut us out of the online sale and distribution of products equation.

UPS could cut Amazon out by no longer delivering Amazon's (our competitor) boxes...say starting December 1st or whenever our contracts run out.

We then form a strategic alliance with a Chinese company, say Alibaba with a written non-compete clause regarding delivery.

By doing so the same Chinese crap people buy from Amazon is delivered by UPS, and we have cut out the Middleman (Amazon).

But who am I but a lowly driver who has seen our once forward looking company transformed into a bureaucracy.
 

Boywondr

The truth never changes.
Amazon is looking forward to cut us out of the online sale and distribution of products equation.

UPS could cut Amazon out by no longer delivering Amazon's (our competitor) boxes...say starting December 1st or whenever our contracts run out.

We then form a strategic alliance with a Chinese company, say Alibaba with a written non-compete clause regarding delivery.

By doing so the same Chinese crap people buy from Amazon is delivered by UPS, and we have cut out the Middleman (Amazon).

But who am I but a lowly driver who has seen our once forward looking company transformed into a bureaucracy.
We love logistics.
 

zubenelgenubi

Well-Known Member
Does anyone here know the terms of our contract with Amazon? We may not be able to drop them, or jack our rates. The UPS lawyers are probably only smart enough to outmaneuver truck drivers when it comes to negotiating contracts, not other high-priced corporate lawyers.
 

cosis

Well-Known Member
Fed-ex drew the line in the sand.

Will our current UPS leadership continue to bow to the almighty Amazon for a few years of profits and sink the tightest ship?

Or will we cut them off before they cut us out?
UPS is going to suck the Amazon teet until they are delivering 2% of Amazon's packages like Fed-ex was..
 

DumbTruckDriver

Allergic to cardboard.
I understand that Amazon has virtually limitless amounts of money, but has anyone thought out what it would take for them to deliver everywhere? It’s one thing to be in all the major metro areas, but there are a ton of smaller buildings all across the country. Dropping a delivery center in every small to medium sized city will take a long time.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
I understand that Amazon has virtually limitless amounts of money, but has anyone thought out what it would take for them to deliver everywhere? It’s one thing to be in all the major metro areas, but there are a ton of smaller buildings all across the country. Dropping a delivery center in every small to medium sized city will take a long time.
IN the US Amazon listed 75 centers in 2017. 160 were listed by 2018. Doubling
each year... We have 1800 operating facilities.

Ups....
Delivery fleet About 123,000 package cars, vans, tractors, motorcycles,
Amazon just ordered 100,000.

Not to mention the tens of tousands of Amazon flex drivers who deliver using their own vehicles.
 
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DumbTruckDriver

Allergic to cardboard.
IN the US Amazon listed 75 centers in 2017. 160 were listed by 2018. Doubling
each year... We have 1800 operating facilities.

Ups....
Delivery fleet About 123,000 package cars, vans, tractors, motorcycles,
Amazon just ordered 100,000.

Not to mention the tens of tousands of Amazon flex drivers who deliver using their own vehicles.
And where will those new 100,000 vehicles be delivering out of, the parking lot of the local dead mall? I work in a town of about 200,000 people that is rapidly growing, and our center reaches parts of ten surrounding counties. Not seeing any signs yet of Amazon showing up, and I don’t expect to any time soon. There’s a lot of towns just like this all across the country.
 

35years

Well-Known Member
And where will those new 100,000 vehicles be delivering out of, the parking lot of the local dead mall? I work in a town of about 200,000 people that is rapidly growing, and our center reaches parts of ten surrounding counties. Not seeing any signs yet of Amazon showing up, and I don’t expect to any time soon. There’s a lot of towns just like this all across the country.
Expect to be seeing them in the next 4 years.
I never saw an Amazon truck until this year.
I see them every day now. I deliver to a town of 30,000. They even deliver to towns with less than 200 people and the surrounding ranches.

We are talking exponential growth...doubling their in house distribution every 3 years or so puts their distribution facilities at 1800 (Ups's current number of facilities) in 9 years.

As of November of 2018...
One of these ( Amazon) fulfillment centers is likely very close.
According to Cooper Smith, an analyst at L2 Inc., a New York-based business-intelligence firm, Amazon “now has warehouses within 20 miles of half the U.S. population.”
 
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