The UPS Career Path(s)?

uks2h

New Member
First of all, thank you all for helping me out with what to wear last night to what turned out to be cornerstone training. I greatly appreciated it.

Secondly, now that I have my first night of cornerstone under me, I awaken this morning with some questions.

I was told that there are two career paths, the management route, or the driver route. I was initially attracted to the driver route, since I like working alone and interacting with the public, and working hard. It seems to me like the way people talk, that maybe that isn't the best idea. These are my questions:

a)How hard is it to pass the tests to be a driver when your time is called?

b)
Is there a guarantee that you will ever be called, rather than waiting for 5-10 years doing the hourly stuff while I could be doing the management route, since I'm getting a business degree?

That is all that I have for now, and again, I really appreciate those of you who can answer the questions I have had and will probably continue to have in the future. I look forward to getting to know you guys as my future begins with the Brown.
 

brownrodster

Well-Known Member
a)How hard is it to pass the tests to be a driver when your time is called?

b)Is there a guarantee that you will ever be called, rather than waiting for 5-10 years doing the hourly stuff while I could be doing the management route, since I'm getting a business degree?

a)
You get 30 days to prove that you work safely and are fast enough.

b)
As long as your driver record is good and you pass a DOT physical if you are the high bidder when they need a new driver then yes you get a chance. How long it takes to get the opportunity is different in each UPS center/hub. Wait in my hub is around 2.5-3 years right now. I know many people who waited more than 5 years.
 

DS

Fenderbender
It seems to me like the way people talk, that maybe that isn't the best idea. These are my questions:

a)How hard is it to pass the tests to be a driver when your time is called? IMHO
It is no walk in the park being a driver,but it does have its advantages over a management position.The big difference being that as a driver you will be asked to do much more work that is humanly possible,but ultimately,its management that pays the price when you cant.
b)Is there a guarantee that you will ever be called, rather than waiting for 5-10 years doing the hourly stuff while I could be doing the management route, since I'm getting a business degree?
Since you are getting a business degree,it seems that going into management would make the most sense,but you must realize that a very small percentage will ever make as much money as a driver.If you turn out to be one of the"least best" they will move you around hoping to find something that they can do without screwing it up.
Then again if you do well, in 20 years you could be out golfing with the CEO and pretending you care about the customer.
 

dirty moose

Well-Known Member
a)How hard is it to pass the tests to be a driver when your time is called?
If you can drive stick and drive safe then its a piece of cake.
b)
Is there a guarantee that you will ever be called, rather than waiting for 5-10 years doing the hourly stuff while I could be doing the management route, since I'm getting a business degree?
Put your name of the list as soon as you can, and yes you will be called. unless they company goes out of business tomorrow. what im saying is if your on the list you'll get a shot at some point.
As for the mngt. and supervision, i know some part time sups (this is what you will start as) that have been part time sups for something like 7 years+ without a promotion.


That is all that I have for now, and again, I really appreciate those of you who can answer the questions I have had and will probably continue to have in the future. I look forward to getting to know you guys as my future begins with the Brown.
[/quote]

The good side to waiting to get called for driving is this, if your in the hub part timing for an extended period of time, you can get your own route in no time at all.

One guy i worked with on the twilight went driving after something like 10 years in the hub and had a route as soon as one was up for bid.
 

satellitedriver

Moderator
Terminology 101;
Driver = Job
Management = possible career

You do not need a degree to drive.
To reach your full potential in mangement, you do.
The path you choose is only up to you.
PAX
 

tonyexpress

Whac-A-Troll Patrol
Staff member
Wow DS I'm surprised by your response! I was a driver and in management and after a few years in management I surpassed my driver wage.

I also cared about the customer while a driver and in management!:blush:

Management is not for everyone but there sure are many opportunities at UPS!
 

cook32nd

Member
I am a previous small package employee. Just recently I saw freight was hiring for a dockworker f/t with cdl. I have the class a cdl and the endorsements hazmat and doubles, however, what do f/t dockworkers with cdl do for work ( daily activities)? Last thing I want to do is go out on the road for days on end? Also, if hired from the outside as a feeder driver for small package in Indianapolis, are all positions considered seasonal/temporary? I saw they pay $20.00 an hour starting as feeder drivers, what does a day or night consisit of for them (start times / end times any overtime?)
 

over9five

Moderator
Staff member
"Its a lot different now Tony"



I agree. We only care about the conference calls and the numbers now. It's amazing the amount of reports that come out every day. I know you will say that caring about good numbers IS caring about your customers, but it's not the same thing.

Some daily reports are:

1. OR (always have had that!)
2. P/Us not made within scheduled time window
3. Large delivery accts not made in time window
4. Yesterdays missing delivery scans
5. Missed pkgs
6. Late pkgs
7. Concerns

Now those are just the ones I could think of right now, I know there are more.
Then for every instance in each report, the center manager needs an explanation (so he can defend himself in the conference call).
The management team has no time to care about the customer!
 

sendagain

Well-Known Member
"Its a lot different now Tony"



I agree. We only care about the conference calls and the numbers now. It's amazing the amount of reports that come out every day. I know you will say that caring about good numbers IS caring about your customers, but it's not the same thing.

Some daily reports are:

1. OR (always have had that!)
2. P/Us not made within scheduled time window
3. Large delivery accts not made in time window
4. Yesterdays missing delivery scans
5. Missed pkgs
6. Late pkgs
7. Concerns

Now those are just the ones I could think of right now, I know there are more.
Then for every instance in each report, the center manager needs an explanation (so he can defend himself in the conference call).
The management team has no time to care about the customer!

This is one of the problems that seems to have developed within the company: management are so busy trying to please people above them that they have no time to keep the customer pleased. Those people above you aren't the ones that put packages in the system.
 

MR_Vengeance

United Parcel Survivor
funny thing is that 90% of the part time sups that started with me are still part time sups. if you want make a career out of UPS, then be a full time driver first then go into on road sup as a full timer.
 

UPS Lifer

Well-Known Member
Terminology 101;
Driver = Job
Management = possible career

You do not need a degree to drive.
To reach your full potential in mangement, you do.
The path you choose is only up to you.
PAX

This has come up before and I have to refute it one more time.

Package or Feeder Driver = CAREER - Don't tell any driver that they don't have a career. Just because you don't have a degree doesn't mean you don't have a career.

I don't think there is any easy job (or career) in UPS. I was a hub person, preload, driver and then spent the rest of my career in mgmt in every dept except automotive.

I can only speak for myself, but even through all the headaches and frustrations of management and time away from my family, I felt that I could make a difference.

The job was challenging every single day. I think this was the key!! There was always something to work on and believe it or not, there is time for your own personal projects to make things better.

I have had the ability to work in many different environments and had district level jobs that allowed me to travel to all parts of the district. There are some centers and or buildings that are run well and some that are not run well. My thing was to make it better no matter what condition I got the operation in. It can be done....and I am talking about today's conditions not 20 years ago!

As for my family...we have survived! My kids turned out well and I am still happily married. My wife and I are coming up on 35 years.

As for wealth and retirement - I will never regret my decision EVER to go into management. YOU make your job what it is...no one else does.

Some nay-sayers will tell you that things are different now. The days of the big bonuses are gone. Well, the nay-sayers said that back in 1978 also.
There was a supervisor who retired and owned oil wells and everyone said that there will not be any more like him again....NOT!

The management incentive still allows career management who know how to invest (key point) the ability to build wealth that most people will not see.
 

tonyexpress

Whac-A-Troll Patrol
Staff member
"Its a lot different now Tony"



I agree. We only care about the conference calls and the numbers now. It's amazing the amount of reports that come out every day. I know you will say that caring about good numbers IS caring about your customers, but it's not the same thing.

Some daily reports are:

1. OR (always have had that!)
2. P/Us not made within scheduled time window
3. Large delivery accts not made in time window
4. Yesterdays missing delivery scans
5. Missed pkgs
6. Late pkgs
7. Concerns

Now those are just the ones I could think of right now, I know there are more.
Then for every instance in each report, the center manager needs an explanation (so he can defend himself in the conference call).
The management team has no time to care about the customer!

I was going to respond and then I read UPS Lifer's response...My sentiments exactly! Thanks Lifer!:cool:

Over,

Your post sounds like it's just the same to me!!

Everthing you mentioned and much more is part of management's job.

Tell me if a management person is following up on missed p/u's, missed scans, and concerns how is that not taking care of the customer??

YOU MAKE TIME FOR THE CUSTOMER OR YOU GO OUT OF BUSINESS!:wink:


"Its a lot different now Tony"

I don't think so...Only the names change the goals are still the same. Get the packages delivered safely, keep a brisk pace and give the customer great service and just maybe there's another 100 years in it for you!:laugh:

While I'm at it Happy Anniversary everyone!!:thumbup1:
 

DS

Fenderbender
"Its a lot different now Tony"

I don't think so...Only the names change the goals are still the same. Get the packages delivered safely, keep a brisk pace and give the customer great service and just maybe there's another 100 years in it for you!:laugh:

While I'm at it Happy Anniversary everyone!!:thumbup1:

I guess I hit a nerve.In no way am I belittling you or your accomplishments at ups.I really wish it was as good as you say it is.
All too often the threads in here turn negative very quickly.I`m not
alone in my jadedness Tony.I dont hate my job,in fact I really like it.
At the moment,we have the best Sup we've ever had.But believe me,
in the past we've had some real doozies.When your getting ahead includes firing all the drivers you don't like.The horror stories I've been reading in here about PAS and the inabilty of management to fix it after all this time is less than something positive to look forward to.But hey man,I`ll be there every day,sweating,freezing,or whatever it takes...
cheers
 

Pollocknbrown

Well-Known Member
Package or Feeder Driver = CAREER - Don't tell any driver that they don't have a career. Just because you don't have a degree doesn't mean you don't have a career.

very true, tell anyone who joined the military, and have been in it for life right out of high school that they don't have a career. You will get a good slap in the back of the head for saying that
 

tonyexpress

Whac-A-Troll Patrol
Staff member
DS222040; said:
I guess I hit a nerve.In no way am I belittling you or your accomplishments at ups.

No nerve hit and I never thought you were saying anything about my accomplishments.

Your original post said that management people don't care about customers and that a very small percentage of management ever make as much as a driver, I just disagreed!!

DS222040; said:
I really wish it was as good as you say it is.
All too often the threads in here turn negative very quickly.I`m not
alone in my jadedness Tony.I dont hate my job,in fact I really like it.
At the moment,we have the best Sup we've ever had.But believe me,
in the past we've had some real doozies.When your getting ahead includes firing all the drivers you don't like.The horror stories I've been reading in here about PAS and the inabilty of management to fix it after all this time is less than something positive to look forward to.But hey man,I`ll be there every day,sweating,freezing,or whatever it takes...
cheers

All these concerns are a completely different topic to what I was responding to...:wink:
 

steakmaker

ride like you stole it
Get your class A license,you can fill in working the yard during the Christmas rush,maybe even go out on Feeders during the "free period"(Nov? to Dec),if not at least get your feet wet and check out ALL the various jobs before you make a desison,You can take the cost of tractor trailer school off your taxes,also some union halls have their own school,We do at local 317 Syracuse.You got your foot in the door now,take your time,I had two friends that I knew before we all went to UPS,they were hired in 1972 & I followed in 1974,everyone was hired f/t back then,anyway they took the tie after about 5yrs,I didn't,I went on feeders(1979),another 5yrs they were gone,I retired in 2005.It's all in what YOU really want.The more jobs in UPS you know how to do well,the better chance you have to make a choice you can live with.I don't know of anyone who took management at UPS that got back in the union,until after they left UPS and found another union co.to work for.The contract benifits with UPS are the BEST you'll ever find anywhere.I know you're a new UPSER,but instead of going for the tie right away,give yourself a chance,get in the union first,at least your back is covered 'till you look around and find out the real story...............GOOD LUCK !......."steakmaker" Syracuse Feeders Retired
 

DS

Fenderbender
Ok Tony I strayed from your original thoughts>I`m just a driver.
I guess if you want to be in mngmt its not that hard.I was wrong.
To quote brazenbrown I think I have
oppositional defiance disorder.
 

browniehound

Well-Known Member
Tonyexpress,
I'm going to back up Over95 here with a prime example as why UPS management is more interested in covering their collective butts than servicing our customers or cutting operation costs in general.

Over95 talked about closing out pick-up stops before their scheduled time. Senario: Over95 gets to ABC drywall at 430 for a 450 pick-up. ABC is a good customer and ships a lot of NDA packages. Its Friday and the owners of ABC want to leave early to beat the traffic up to the lake. Over95 makes the pick-up and is done by 435.

But, Over can't leave at 435, because Over95's center manager wants him to sit there until 450 rather than let him dust off 10 house-calls, because the center manager will show up on a report that his driver closed out a pick-up 15 minutes early.

If it TRULY was the center manager's business(IE money) there is no way he would let this happen. The business is losing money in the form of 15 minutes of labor for just sitting there and it compounds when that fifteen minutes of doing house-calls would be fifteen minutes less overtime needed to be paid.

And Over can't prerecord the pick-up and close it out later while he is doing house call because this would be falsiflying delivery records and he will be fired.

Its a wonder we have been in business for 100 years:confused:1


I was going to respond and then I read UPS Lifer's response...My sentiments exactly! Thanks Lifer!:cool:

Over,

Your post sounds like it's just the same to me!!

Everthing you mentioned and much more is part of management's job.

Tell me if a management person is following up on missed p/u's, missed scans, and concerns how is that not taking care of the customer??

YOU MAKE TIME FOR THE CUSTOMER OR YOU GO OUT OF BUSINESS!:wink:


"Its a lot different now Tony"

I don't think so...Only the names change the goals are still the same. Get the packages delivered safely, keep a brisk pace and give the customer great service and just maybe there's another 100 years in it for you!:laugh:

While I'm at it Happy Anniversary everyone!!:thumbup1:
 

tonyexpress

Whac-A-Troll Patrol
Staff member
Ok Tony I strayed from your original thoughts>I`m just a driver.
I guess if you want to be in mngmt its not that hard.I was wrong.
To quote brazenbrown I think I have
oppositional defiance disorder.

I don't think you have ODD and being a driver is a good thing it definitely can be a great way to make a living.

Deciding to go into management is a personal choice and both driving and being a manager have their challenges.:thumbup1:

Tonyexpress,
I'm going to back up Over95 here with a prime example as why UPS management is more interested in covering their collective butts than servicing our customers or cutting operation costs in general.

Over95 talked about closing out pick-up stops before their scheduled time. Senario: Over95 gets to ABC drywall at 430 for a 450 pick-up. ABC is a good customer and ships a lot of NDA packages. Its Friday and the owners of ABC want to leave early to beat the traffic up to the lake. Over95 makes the pick-up and is done by 435.

But, Over can't leave at 435, because Over95's center manager wants him to sit there until 450 rather than let him dust off 10 house-calls, because the center manager will show up on a report that his driver closed out a pick-up 15 minutes early.

If it TRULY was the center manager's business(IE money) there is no way he would let this happen. The business is losing money in the form of 15 minutes of labor for just sitting there and it compounds when that fifteen minutes of doing house-calls would be fifteen minutes less overtime needed to be paid.

And Over can't prerecord the pick-up and close it out later while he is doing house call because this would be falsiflying delivery records and he will be fired.

Its a wonder we have been in business for 100 years:confused:1

It's not a matter of taking sides... You see that in it self is a problem. Everyone is in this together or you all go up in smoke!!

I can sure see your point...But there have to be exceptions made. Customers leave early for the weekend and days before a holiday all the time so there has to be some way of dealing with this kind of situation because it is common place. There are always exceptions!!

I'm sure when BD was out to this account they guaranteed them the specific 4:50pm p/u time. If they want to leave early all Over should have to do is let his sup or manager know and then when his manager reports why he picked up early he has a valid reason and that's it!

I know it's not always that easy but his manager as well as him have to be accountable to always doing their best to take care of the customer.

It doesn't always make sense from the driver's perspective and perhaps it's not being communicated properly but working together as a team always has its benefits and sometimes making a phone call and putting it on management works best.

In this case staying for nothing and wasting over's time makes no sense to me!!:thumbup1:

Again, working together makes it possible to be in business for 100 Years!!
 
Top