Will I have to pay back my vacation after I retire??

Hroller

Well-Known Member
The plan is to take my bonus week, right after New Years Day.
Then take the rest of my vacation in subsequent weeks during January.
Then retire in February 2022.
Now, I've been told... that since the vacation weeks (besides bonus week) don't really kick in until my hire/date (October), the company is actually "loaning me" that vacation until that hire date. Since I will no longer be working then, I will be required to pay that vacation money back!
Anyone with experience or information regarding this ?
 
The plan is to take my bonus week, right after New Years Day.
Then take the rest of my vacation in subsequent weeks during January.
Then retire in February 2022.
Now, I've been told... that since the vacation weeks (besides bonus week) don't really kick in until my hire/date (October), the company is actually "loaning me" that vacation until that hire date. Since I will no longer be working then, I will be required to pay that vacation money back!
Anyone with experience or information regarding this ?
The vacation for next year you already earned it working this year
 

Jones

fILE A GRIEVE!
Staff member
The plan is to take my bonus week, right after New Years Day.
Then take the rest of my vacation in subsequent weeks during January.
Then retire in February 2022.
Now, I've been told... that since the vacation weeks (besides bonus week) don't really kick in until my hire/date (October), the company is actually "loaning me" that vacation until that hire date. Since I will no longer be working then, I will be required to pay that vacation money back!
Anyone with experience or information regarding this ?
Never heard any nonsense like that. I think someone is pulling your leg.
 

728ups

offending people on the internet since 1995
January 9 2021 was my last day. I used my vacation weeks and option week and drew my first retirement check 03/01/2021.As has been stated you earned your retirement weeks this year
 

Captain Qwark

"I don't deserve these bulbous buttocks."
If I'm understanding this correctly, you've accrued vacation from 10/2020 - 10/2021 that you sign up for this time of year (between Oct./Dec) to be taken from 10/2021 - 10/2022. There's no way you have to pay any of that back. When you retire in February you will be paid off for any accrued vacation (vacation weeks you have past February) plus any carry-overs if applicable. I'm assuming you meant October is your seniority date and not your hire date; it's the seniority date you go by. Vacations are earned seniority date to seniority date and not Jan. 1 to Jan. 1.

I don't know if I made that clear, but this is how it works in my neck of the woods. I'd talk with the person who does time cards for a definitive answer and if they don't know, ask them if they would make a payroll inquiry on your behalf. That way you will know for sure.
 

Hroller

Well-Known Member
Captain Qwark....yes I did mean "seniority date." But the question remains, if I take all my vacation weeks (4 total) in January 2022, which I don't become eligible for until October 2022....will I be required to pay those back after I retire in February 2022?
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
If I'm understanding this correctly, you've accrued vacation from 10/2020 - 10/2021 that you sign up for this time of year (between Oct./Dec) to be taken from 10/2021 - 10/2022. There's no way you have to pay any of that back. When you retire in February you will be paid off for any accrued vacation (vacation weeks you have past February) plus any carry-overs if applicable. I'm assuming you meant October is your seniority date and not your hire date; it's the seniority date you go by. Vacations are earned seniority date to seniority date and not Jan. 1 to Jan. 1.

I don't know if I made that clear, but this is how it works in my neck of the woods. I'd talk with the person who does time cards for a definitive answer and if they don't know, ask them if they would make a payroll inquiry on your behalf. That way you will know for sure.
Here, they used to use the seniority date. But, several years ago Jan to Jan was converted to all to clear up any confusion. That was very helpful all around. I always thought it was idiotic to have to save bidding my weeks until that day.
 

DriverNerd

Well-Known Member
Captain Qwark....yes I did mean "seniority date." But the question remains, if I take all my vacation weeks (4 total) in January 2022, which I don't become eligible for until October 2022....will I be required to pay those back after I retire in February 2022?
You didn't read his post correctly. Your 2022 vacations you have earned by working your hours the previous year. You don't have any vacations to use now that you will be eligible to use in October next year.
 

DriverNerd

Well-Known Member
You still get the vacation time off based on years of service. The pay for those vacations would be prorated.
Correct. I was referring to that if he worked enough hours he is eligible for all of his vacations regardless of when he takes them the next year, and if he retires immediately after. I should have been clearer.
 

Commercial Inside Release

Well-Known Member
Time off viewer shows minus (-XXhrs) for many people after they use up their annual time off. Some management have begun to tell teamsters they will have to pay back their vacation pay if they quit, get fired or retire.

Funny thing is, Time Off Viewer has an odd way of accounting for time. If you have +10wks of vacation time, and you use all 10wks, the viewer shows -10wks. Which is idiotic, since +10wks - 10wks = 0wks, but viewer shows -10wks.
 

satellitedriver

Moderator
It is such a simple topic.
Retire in January and all vacation time occurred the previous year will be paid.
I thought all the union tuff guys would have informed you of your "benefits".
Do simple research.
 

trickpony1

Well-Known Member
I know someone who worked the first week of January and then took his 7 weeks of vacation (earned the previous year) in a row.
By doing this he:
-had health insurance until his retirement date of February 28;
-he could change his mind and keep working and;
-he earned an additional week of vacation for which he took the money and ran.

He had a Union "tuff guy" suggest this.

Beneficial helping.
 

satellitedriver

Moderator
I know someone who worked the first week of January and then took his 7 weeks of vacation (earned the previous year) in a row.
By doing this he:
-had health insurance until his retirement date of February 28;
-he could change his mind and keep working and;
-he earned an additional week of vacation for which he took the money and ran.

He had a Union "tuff guy" suggest this.

Beneficial helping.
Almost my exact story, minus the "tuff guy" reference.
Retired on Feb 28th 2014 to make sure the 2013 contract would be enforced that UPS would make up the short fall if Central States retirement plan went belly up.
Democrats saved the day with tax money to keep Central States afloat for the time being.
Kind of ironic that 90% of the tax payer money was paid by people that do not belong to a union.
Look at, and compare, the fiduciary stability of union retirement funding and UPS retirement.
One does not have to have a masters degree from Wharton college to tell the difference from promises made, and promises kept.
What the hell do I know. I am just a simple country boy.
 

bottomups

Bad Moon Risen'
Almost my exact story, minus the "tuff guy" reference.
Retired on Feb 28th 2014 to make sure the 2013 contract would be enforced that UPS would make up the short fall if Central States retirement plan went belly up.
Democrats saved the day with tax money to keep Central States afloat for the time being.
Kind of ironic that 90% of the tax payer money was paid by people that do not belong to a union.
Look at, and compare, the fiduciary stability of union retirement funding and UPS retirement.
One does not have to have a masters degree from Wharton college to tell the difference from promises made, and promises kept.
What the hell do I know. I am just a simple country boy.
Same here. My last day worked was a Christmas Eve with a planned March 1st retirement date.
Technically I should have had to work about 10 days in the new year but UPS let me break up a weeks vacation into single days and cover pension and healthcare benefits spread over the 2 weeks.
 

DriverNerd

Well-Known Member
How many hours do you need each year to keep full vacation time? I've heard 1250, 1800, and 2000. Never could pinpoint a straight answer
Depends on your supplement. In the central:
To be eligible for his/her full vacation after the first year of
employment, an employee must have worked one thousand two
hundred fifty (1,250) straight-time hours and must have been em-
ployed for one (1) full year. During the second and subsequent
years, the employee must have worked one thousand two hundred
fifty (1,250) straight-time hours, but need not be employed the full
year to be eligible for the vacation. Computation of one thousand
two hundred fifty (1,250) straight-time hours for qualification shall
begin only on employment date and anniversaries thereof.
Part-time employees shall be covered by the same schedule, but
must have worked one-half (1/2) of the hours shown above, and
shall be paid at the
 
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