Become a driver in Irvine, CA

Discussion in 'UPS Discussions' started by mrwilson, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. mrwilson

    mrwilson New Member

    I am new to this site and I am in the process of seeking employment with UPS. I have applied for a few positions in the last couple of days. Two of the positions were part time and one was full time. They were all Warehouse positions, not driver positions. My questions are these:

    1) Does UPS ever hire Drivers directly, or do they promote people into these positions from within?

    2) If I took a position either full time or part time, can anybody give me an estimate of how long I might have to wait before I would be promoted if I wanted to work in Irvine?

    3) If I took a job at a local hub other than Irvine (Anaheim, La Mirada, etc.), would I be able to easily transfer to another hub if a driver job opened up? Or do I need to go to work for the specific hub that I want to drive for?

    3) Is Irvine a tough area to get hired into as a driver? I know it's a very busy location, but do positions open up with any regularity?

    For background information on myself, I am currently working in the mortgage industry. I am looking to make a career change and jump into a completely different line of work. I decided I wanted to come work for UPS because I'm tired of sitting in front of a computer all day. I want to do something more physically and mentally stimulating. Also, I recently got married and have a child on the way and I would really like to find more stable work outside of the very volatile mortgage industry. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. MR_Vengeance

    MR_Vengeance United Parcel Survivor

    1) Does UPS ever hire Drivers directly, or do they promote people into these positions from within?

    6 to 1 ratio, 6 insiders and 1 outsider, if you want to be the (1) then better show them you can drive.

    2) If I took a position either full time or part time, can anybody give me an estimate of how long I might have to wait before I would be promoted if I wanted to work in Irvine?

    well, say if you become a loader first, then it'd depend on your senority and how bad your hub needs drivers. you can wait up to 6-10 years if your hub is small.

    3) If I took a job at a local hub other than Irvine (Anaheim, La Mirada, etc.), would I be able to easily transfer to another hub if a driver job opened up? Or do I need to go to work for the specific hub that I want to drive for?

    better stay in the hub where you start working. transfer is is almost impossible for drivers. you can do it as part timer only for educational reasons.

    3) Is Irvine a tough area to get hired into as a driver? I know it's a very busy location, but do positions open up with any regularity?

    it would be better just to ask an Irvine driver to see if they are short or not.

    For background information on myself, I am currently working in the mortgage industry. I am looking to make a career change and jump into a completely different line of work. I decided I wanted to come work for UPS because I'm tired of sitting in front of a computer all day. I want to do something more physically and mentally stimulating. Also, I recently got married and have a child on the way and I would really like to find more stable work outside of the very volatile mortgage industry. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

    grass always looks greener on the other side, make sure you are ready both mentally and physically before you jump ship. goodluck.........
     
  3. AznDiablo

    AznDiablo Senior Member

    1) Does UPS ever hire Drivers directly, or do they promote people into these positions from within? 6 inside to 1 outside ratio. UPS mostly promotes within and most people usually have to start out at the bottom and work their way up the seniority ladder.

    2) If I took a position either full time or part time, can anybody give me an estimate of how long I might have to wait before I would be promoted if I wanted to work in Irvine? Most People start out working either loading/unloading and working their way up. I work nearby in the West Los Angeles District and it's approximately 5 years to become a driver or so the union stewart says, and I don't work out of a small hub.
    3) If I took a job at a local hub other than Irvine (Anaheim, La Mirada, etc.), would I be able to easily transfer to another hub if a driver job opened up? Or do I need to go to work for the specific hub that I want to drive for? Yes you are allowed to. As long as you're in the same district you will be allowed to bid on driving jobs out of the same district.
    3) Is Irvine a tough area to get hired into as a driver? I know it's a very busy location, but do positions open up with any regularity? This I don't know.
     
  4. trickpony1

    trickpony1 Well-Known Member

    Mr Wilson-
    If you are making good money in the mortgage industry stay there.
    Surf this forum and read the posts from drivers who are afraid they won't make it to retirement because their body is falling apart. The company can espouse "safe work methods" all they want......this job will eventually destroy you.
    If you want something more "physical and mentally stimulating", get a membership to the local gym. You and the wife will benefit from regular exercise minus the constant stress from working, usually late into the evening, for this company.

    The grass isn't always greener.........
     
  5. Fredless

    Fredless APWA Hater

    Cover driving was the hardest thing I have ever done in my young life, ever. I turned 21 in January 2006, became an air driver in March 2006 and only because I wanted to wait to finish that spring term at college did I wait till May of 2006 to become a driver.

    The money was nice, but I went crawling back to school and decided to start studying, go to class and pick a useful degree or else I'd be back in a package car until I was 62. I didn't want to spend 41 years in a truck before I could retire.

    Now that I still air drive, I'm a lot more confident in the truck now and I know I'd do a lot better knowing what to expect, I'm still wary to go back into it. No one can imagine how hard being a driver is until you sit in that seat yourself.

    P.S. I got LUCKY, and got a Ford P1000. Why? I was thankful it didn't have a high step and had power steering.
     
  6. MSGTDEL

    MSGTDEL New Member

    One thing you should consider, this job i very time intensive meaning you may not have time for your wife and your new baby when you get off in the evenings. I see drivers here in atlanta getting back to the building at 9.30 pm. or later. The lastest I've seen during a non-peak season period is 11.30 at night. They still have to do their check in, clock out and drive home, clean up, eat, talk to the wife and kids. Sex? Well, after 180 stops, I'm not sure, lol. UPS still has trucks that are not "power-steering" and you may have one on your route. Drivers do do well but it will be about 24-30 months before you top out in your pay. You have to also realize that the job is very physically demanding plus the pressure to perform on the job, i.e., getting you numbers, running scratch, should I take a lunch break or run this 20 stops now, do you have a good pre-loader, etc... I suggest you look at this forum and talk to drivers your area before making that move. I know you need to support your family but remember, it's not always about the money.
     
  7. ups_vette

    ups_vette New Member

    mrwilson....First of all let me state that working for UPS in not for everyone. Whatever position you have at UPS requires skills and abilites that not everyone can, or wants, to learn.

    A few posters have stated that the job is physicaly demanding and hard on the body, leading to numerous physical ailments such as back problems, torn knees and shoulders. Another poster warned that you will have no time to spend with your wife and baby since you will be working long hours, and be too tired when you come home. There was another poster who advised you to saty where you are and not work for UPS.

    It seems all the posters gave various reasons for not working for UPS. Do you find it the least bit curious that all the posters who gave all those negative views of working for UPS are current employees of UPS? Do you wonder why, if UPS is such a bad place to work, they all still work there everyday? I would think that if UPS was as bad as they say, they would no longer work there. Surely anyone who worked for a company as bad as they indicated would leave, even if they had to work for less money at another company. I can think of only two reasons why they would stay at UPS. One is it's not nearly as bad as the portrayed it, and two is they don't have the courage of their convictions and leave that terrible place of employment, UPS.
     
  8. trickpony1

    trickpony1 Well-Known Member

    Mr Wilson-
    The poster that posed the question of why do apparently unhappy employees continue to work for such a "bad" company may have failed to mention something referred to as "pension" but then he probably wouldn't know anything about that since, I believe, he is a retired and very wealthy manager who didn't spend 20+ years jumping in and out of a package car.

    hmmm..........
     
  9. Annymous Cow

    Annymous Cow Guest

    Ah, the PENSION!

    LOL.

    Cut your losses and I guarantee you’ll make up what you lose somewhere else.

    You won’t do it though.

    It’d take some initiative.

    You wouldn’t be in feeders or spend 20 years hopping in/out of a package car all day if you had any.

    Most posters here are the “occupy space and milk the ride” type that constitutes the Teamsters today.

    Forget your pension. Go ahead and assume you’re not going to get one – that way you won’t be disappointed and might be mildly surprised if a few dollars end up in your pocket.

    Now why stay… hmmm.
     
  10. antimatter

    antimatter New Member

    As a delivery driver in Irvine for 15 years in an industrial area, I wasn't burdened with 180 stops a day, like some of my co-workers who delivered residential areas. It is hard work, but the pay is good and if you like to deal with people, it's a great job. With the re-loop that took place a few years ago, the "incentive" money (bonus) pretty much vanished so you would be working "scratch". It IS a physical job and you will feel it. I've been at UPS for a while (in my 31st year) and took care of myself and didn't sustain any serious injuries. I still hike and river raft but do feel the cumulative effects of the line of work I chose... but I enjoyed it.

    There are a number of new faces in Irvine Center now (I drive feeder -big rigs- out of the same facility) and it looks like you could hire on as a preloader (part-time... we go through a lot of them) and then move up in a year or two. The facility seems to always be training new drivers... (many are called, few are chosen).

    As earlier stated, the job isn't for everyone.

    A.
     
  11. RockyRogue

    RockyRogue Agent of Change

    Now, this is my kinda poster. Why don't you register? There're people that agree with you. -Rocky
     
  12. trickpony1

    trickpony1 Well-Known Member

    RockyRogue and Anon Cow-

    .....out of the mouths of babes......

    We all hope to someday be as smart (Anon Cow) and innocent (rockyrogue) as you are.
    That would truly be a smart move to quit now and throw away all the accrued pension credits that we might hope to use in our latter years. :thumbup1:

    Neither of you seem trapped by something known as "dollars per hour" and "pension". :crying:

    Apparently you two have also failed to consider another factor sometimes known as "age discrimination". Although "illegal", it is skillfully concealed and rampant in todays society. Who or what employer is gonna hire a 40+, 50+ or early 60 year old THAT JUST QUIT WORKING FOR OUR COMPANY (think, man, think!).

    I think you two have some surprises coming.

    Sail on, Good Ship Lollipop, sail on
     
  13. ups_vette

    ups_vette New Member

    mrwilson,

    I believe I am the poster who sickpony was refering to. It's true that I am a retired manager for UPS, having worked there for over 32 years. As far as being wealthy, that depends on your definition of wealth. In sickpony's case, that would be anyone living in a double-wide trailor or a house.

    While it's true I didn't spend 20 years jumping in and out package car, I did spend over six years as a delivery driver, steping in and out a package car. UPS teaches their drivers to step in and out, not to jump, as evidently sickpony did. Perhaps that is why he claimed the work was hard on his body.

    sickpony,

    I suggest you look up the word "vested" in a dictionary.
    When you find the definition of "vested" you will see that you will NOT lose the pension you have accrued to date. So the fear of losing your pension should have no bearing on you leaving that terrible place of employment, UPS.
    As far as your ability to find another job because of your age, the only problem I suspect you would have is if the new employer required some sort of intelligence test.
     
  14. tieguy

    tieguy Banned

    Touche' :thumbup1:
     
  15. tieguy

    tieguy Banned

    IN your case attitude discrimination would be more the reason you would not be hired on the outside.

    I can see the interview now:

    Well trick tell us what significant accomplishment you had in your last job?

    Trick> well I vested in the pension..and ..um ..I filed a lot of grievances. ....ur um....is that enough?
     
  16. trickpony1

    trickpony1 Well-Known Member

    I knew if I waited long enough a management poster(s) would attempt a counterpoint.
    But, alas, they failed to address my concern about "age discrimination". So they apparently think any one of any age can just run right out, apply for any job and not be scrutinized regarding age.
    I knew I could count on you! :thumbup1:

    PS- I'm acquainted with the word "vested". Thanks anyway.
     
  17. trickpony1

    trickpony1 Well-Known Member

    Tie-
    I might actually be an accomplished individual and may be working on more accomplishments as we speak. But, unlike yourself, I don't feel the need to parade my accomplishments around.

    Perhaps your signature line should be:

    "Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, supervise". :thumbup1:
     
  18. browniehound

    browniehound Well-Known Member

    Annymous Cow (thats how he spelled it) posted:
    "Most posters here are the “occupy space and milk the ride” type that constitutes the Teamsters today"

    I can tell you right now, they are few an far between at UPS ,teamsters, management, and non-union. A job a UPS will never be confused with a job in the public sector like a state agency (Massport here in Boston comes to mind), where people are feeding of the public trough and basically performing no function. Here at Massport (they run the airport and bridges) toll collectors make 60,000 per year and 6 weeks vacation-all from tax-payers money. So next time you think a UPSer is on "the milk ride", think again. This is one place in corporate America that actually busts their hump. I know there are other hard workers, but few are harder workers than UPSers.
     
  19. MR_Vengeance

    MR_Vengeance United Parcel Survivor

    why do you keep calling him "SICKPONY"? it's TRICKPONY!are you here to proof a point or here to degrade a man?? Talking about employer should require some sort of intelligence test, how 'bout you spell his SN correctly?
     
  20. ups_vette

    ups_vette New Member

    If this were true, why would an accomplished individual be afraid of age discrimination when applying for a job? Unless you're not really that accomplished in anything besides knowing how to tie your shoes without help.

    You may be aquainted with the word "vested", but you show a lack of understanding how it applies to your pension at UPS.