How is it determine which PT employees get offered a management position?

bleedinbrown58

Doesn’t have a Member
I like to think I'm excellent. But this is the internet so it doesn't really mean anything without proof.


I'll keep an eye on the bids. I don't think I've ever seen one for a supe position. It doesn't hurt to check when I come in for work though.
He was being sarcastic. There are no bids for management positions because managers and supervisors aren’t a part of the union. They can be fired or transferred at will.
 

Brown Biscuit

Blind every day
I was asked to become a sup the same week I qualified in the unload. I had a driver friend that warned me they will do this. I laughed in their face and said no shot. That job is the bottom of the barrel you better be ready to get your ass chewed every day and take it like a champ.
 

Sissy Brown Short Shorts

Well-Known Member
They like to get them young. The longer you work here the more you know about working for UPS, union indoctrination, making too many friends. I was asked half a dozen times to be a sup when I started inside my first couple months. And I was only driving half a year when they asked me if I wanted to be an on road.
 

Mrwong

Most-Hated Member
Don’t do it. It’s a :censored2:ty position and you will end up regretting it. Stay with the union. By the way it’s not a promotion. Literally anyone can become a supervisor here.
 
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trickpony1

Well-Known Member
Don’t do it. It’s a :censored2:ty position and you will end up regretting it. Stay with the union. By the way it’s not a promotion. Literally anyone can become a supervisor here.
But it looks good when you tell the ladies at the club that you're a $upervisor at UP$$$$$.
Just, accidentally, forget to tell them you're PT.

Socially helping.
 

rod

Retired 20 years
They used to offer it to everyone. Even young Rod was offered a chance in the early days. Now you know how hard up they can get.
 

Integrity

Binge Poster
I assumed since I was part of a union that management would be offered based on seniority. But I've been at UPS for just shy of two years now and I've watched multiple people that have been here less than a year become supervisors before me. I've told the boss that I plan to stick around for years and that I'd like a supervisor position, but he just seems to ignore that. So if it's not offered based on seniority, then how does one obtain a supervisor position?
@Magpie,

Did you ask your FT Supervisor this question?
 

Gabba

It's a vicious cycle
first off they follow the peter principle and assume that your ability to manage others in a job is primarily based on your proficiency in doing that job. second they look at your attitude and whether you ascribe to or eschew union-ish values. so right there, you're out. third they make an assessment of your general aptitude, are you smart. and finally if everything else isn't satisfied they look for a warm body to fill a slot.
 

upser2020

Well-Known Member
From what I've seen the real(probably only) benefit to taking a promotion to pt sup is you want to get either a full time sup and eventually manager position or a specialist. Pt sups make a little more per hour(tho that could change if they bring back the mra) but their overtime doesn't kick in until 8 hours a day or 40 a week. They are guaranteed 27.5 hours a week but often outside of peak capped at 40 vs hourlies are sometimes begged to work triples. On paper pt sups aren't supposed to do union work but in practice you often work as much if not more that your hourly workers. You are also accountable for more and as has been mentioned do not have the same protections as being a union member. Having said that the one thing is that in management you do in theory have a lot more opportunities and a potential to make more(as I understand it ft sups base salary is in the 60k range and managers are just shy of 100) and you can go higher than that vs I don't think as an hourly even a feeder you would do much better than 100k(which is still good). I know from experience what is expected from pt sups and am glad I am not(officially) one. If I had a clear and quick path to being a full time sup that might be a different story but even as just a pt hourly I made 55k last year.
 

SorryLazyPOS

Big Kahuna Burger
But it looks good when you tell the ladies at the club that you're a $upervisor at UP$$$$$.
Just, accidentally, forget to tell them you're PT.

Socially helping.
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scratch

Least Best Moderator
Staff member
You just have to fill out a Letter of Intent and apply for it. There used to be some kind of test involved. I used to get a letter in the mail on the first of every year asking to apply for it, I never thought it was worth it once I went full-time. Management experience on a resume does look good if you want to work somewhere else.
 

dudebro

Well-Known Member
The comment above mine is correct, although I'm not sure the definition of "scab" is someone who wants to go into management. The first qualification for management is (should be) that you want to go into management. Telling your management that you want to be considered is the first step. It's not offered by seniority.

Selectivity will be determined by how badly the management ranks are understaffed. If it's staffed up in a rural area and people have to retire to make room, they're super selective. If it's a night hub or a preload in a metropolitan area, you might just have to fog a mirror and have a background check that comes up "not too bad".
 
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