I’m a 22 year old 22.4 driver and I feel like quitting. Need advice

Itchris

New Member
Hello, I’m 22 years old and have been a 22.4 driver for close to a year now and looking for advice from fellow UPSers

I started working at UPS when I was 18 and was a loader until I turned 21 and became a 22.4 driver. After the grueling 30 day probation and a couple months of driving I thought I’ve really gotten the hang of things and this was going to be the beginning and the end of my working career. Fast forward to a year later I have had no problems being a proficient driver but the physical toll (thus turning into a mental toll) is starting to weigh on me.

I love being a driver with all the good and bad that comes with it but I’m getting to a point where I don’t think my body can take doing 200-220 stops with 300-350 packages 10h avg every day 5-6 days a week. I know this is the norm for a lot of drivers out there but I can’t see myself doing this for years. My lower back and shoulders feel like they’re slowly deteriorating into irreversible damage as the months go on.

I’m conflicted on quitting because although I believe I’m doing fairly well currently financial wise and have no worries about that I feel like I’m throwing away a very good career.

I’m mainly posting this because I’m wondering what my options are going forward. Best case scenario is I’d like to go back to the hub and continue driving part time.

Thank you for reading this far. I hope none of you think I’m just lazy. I believe I’m a very hard worker and that’s what’s even got me this far but I am prioritizing my current and future physical well being.
 
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Seymour Packages

Well-Known Member
My advice to you is to apply to every civil service/government job, apprenticeship for skilled trades, or get a college degree online and join the military as an officer. Once another stable career path gives you a chance, take it and run with it. You are too young to commit to UPS. This company is not what it was even when I started. It is only going to get worse with more technology, management harrassment, and a weak union. Get the hell out of here while you are young and don't have to worry about kids, a mortgage, etc. You can find comparable pay and benefits in many other jobs/careers. Don't drink the kool aid thinking that this place has to be your last stop.

In terms of your workload: it will be impossible to control stop counts due to the fact that you don't have a route. As a 22.4, you will probably pick and do the routes left over. This you can't control. What you can control however is taking your breaks/lunch at the correct time, working safe, and not letting the company bullcrap get to you. 300 stops? Fine. Work safe until you have to head back or they send help. Too many pick up? Send a message and keep working safe. Don't make their problems your problems, and NEVER bring this job home. Good luck to you.
 

Itchris

New Member
This is some solid advice that I needed to hear. Especially the part where I am too young to think that this is going to be my last stop career. Thank you!
 

tadpole

Well-Known Member
You won't be a 22.4 forever. When you become a RPCD, you'll be able to get on the 9.5 list. They'll have to reduce your workload. You'll still have some really heavy days but only sometimes.

If you can think of a better plan for your career, I say go for it and leave UPS. If not, then it makes more sense to stick it out. Going back to part time isn't really an option unless you quit and get rehired. I believe it is possible but incredibly rare. Check with your steward/BA but I give you a 0% chance of that happening for you.

One last thing. You say you're a very hard worker, and that's great. But don't let them take advantage of you. Here, they like to take work off the slow guys and give it to the fast guys. If you do 200 stops and get done at 4pm, they'll look at it like, oh, @Itchris needs more work and they'll give you 250 stops. So my advice is work at a pace that you can sustain for years to come without killing your body. Work safely, use the handtruck. It will take longer but that's not your problem.
 

MyTripisCut

Let’s get back
Hello, I’m 22 years old and have been a 22.4 driver for close to a year now and looking for advice from fellow UPSers

I started working at UPS when I was 18 and was a loader until I turned 21 and became a 22.4 driver. After the grueling 30 day probation and a couple months of driving I thought I’ve really gotten the hang of things and this was going to be the beginning and the end of my working career. Fast forward to a year later I have had no problems being a proficient driver but the physical toll (thus turning into a mental toll) is starting to weigh on me.

I love being a driver with all the good and bad that comes with it but I’m getting to a point where I don’t think my body can take doing 200-220 stops with 300-350 packages 10h avg every day 5-6 days a week. I know this is the norm for a lot of drivers out there but I can’t see myself doing this for years. My lower back and shoulders feel like they’re slowly deteriorating into irreversible damage as the months go on.

I’m conflicted on quitting because although I believe I’m doing fairly well currently financial wise and have no worries about that I feel like I’m throwing away a very good career.

I’m mainly posting this because I’m wondering what my options are going forward. Best case scenario is I’d like to go back to the hub and continue driving part time.

Thank you for reading this far. I hope none of you think I’m just lazy. I believe I’m a very hard worker and that’s what’s even got me this far but I am prioritizing my current and future physical well being.
Get back in the hub, go to school or learn an actual trade. Twenty two is still a baby you have so much time to find something that is better for you. On the flip side, find out what the feeder list in your hub is like and explore that option as well. Package car is Jackass work, at your age I’d find something else.
 

BigGuy2732

Well-Known Member
Work safe enough to get dropped to 150. When you come in, and that stop count is even 20 stops higher, you make sure you let them know how safe you can work by coming in at 830,
Or even better, calling them and saying I have airs, so someone has to come get them and you get to stay out till 9+ working safe.
 

Cowboy Mac

Well-Known Member
I came to the realization a few years ago that even if you work always by the methods, take your full lunch, file 9.5, work at a pace you can maintain for 30 years. Even if you do all that, you will still be in pain when you get home. Your stop counts will lower a bit, and management will eventually leave you alone and send you the help you need. But your body will still be in pain.

For me, the answer was to become a feeder driver. The only real physical aspect to feeders is your left leg will be a little sore from shifting a manual tractor, a little arm workout from raising the landing gear, and lifting a dolly which is like doing squats. But those feel like little exercises because it is short and quick, not like the knee and back pain and body stiffness you get from package.

So I would look into feeders if I were you. Read the Feeder Driver FAQ on Browncafe. Ask drivers at your building about the job, find out what the wait time is for the bid list and hang in there because it can be better for you at UPS.
 

DELACROIX

In the Spirit of Honore' Daumier
I came to the realization a few years ago that even if you work always by the methods, take your full lunch, file 9.5, work at a pace you can maintain for 30 years. Even if you do all that, you will still be in pain when you get home. Your stop counts will lower a bit, and management will eventually leave you alone and send you the help you need. But your body will still be in pain.

For me, the answer was to become a feeder driver. The only real physical aspect to feeders is your left leg will be a little sore from shifting a manual tractor, a little arm workout from raising the landing gear, and lifting a dolly which is like doing squats. But those feel like little exercises because it is short and quick, not like the knee and back pain and body stiffness you get from package.

So I would look into feeders if I were you. Read the Feeder Driver FAQ on Browncafe. Ask drivers at your building about the job, find out what the wait time is for the bid list and hang in there because it can be better for you at UPS.

With one year seniority...he might be facing lay offs according to how our volume goes. The work is a lot easier than Package, you just have to adjust your sleeping patterns according to what run you are working. Not sure about your position on the On Call list, if you can survive a cut in hours it would definitely be the place to go. Considering you are 22 years and already feeling it take the jump, this work is a marathon not a 100 yard sprint.
 
Get back in the hub, go to school or learn an actual trade. Twenty two is still a baby you have so much time to find something that is better for you. On the flip side, find out what the feeder list in your hub is like and explore that option as well. Package car is Jackass work, at your age I’d find something else.
He probably can't go back inside since he's full time now
 

ACG12

Member
I mean technically you are considered a part time driver, but the company has abused the 22.4 combo position by using them as full time drivers for cheap labor.
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
He probably can't go back inside since he's full time now
I was thinking the same. Unless he can bid an inside pure 22 job. These are carwash and fueling(here).

It's hard to believe he's breaking down after just 1 year. I don't think I could have lasted 30 years in a pkg car. Just too much lifting and up and down. He's young enough to start over. I hope he has college taken care of. He's screwed on tuition reimbursement now.

Not all hubs have feeder. Downsides of feeder are well documented. He's young enough to become a top hand eventually.

In the end, he only has 1 year full time as I understand it. Not much.

Unless feeder is available....I'd quit.

Maybe....he could quit and get hired as a part-timer again. Not much to lose. And get that tuition reimbursement....
 

burrheadd

KING Of GIFS
Hello, I’m 22 years old and have been a 22.4 driver for close to a year now and looking for advice from fellow UPSers

I started working at UPS when I was 18 and was a loader until I turned 21 and became a 22.4 driver. After the grueling 30 day probation and a couple months of driving I thought I’ve really gotten the hang of things and this was going to be the beginning and the end of my working career. Fast forward to a year later I have had no problems being a proficient driver but the physical toll (thus turning into a mental toll) is starting to weigh on me.

I love being a driver with all the good and bad that comes with it but I’m getting to a point where I don’t think my body can take doing 200-220 stops with 300-350 packages 10h avg every day 5-6 days a week. I know this is the norm for a lot of drivers out there but I can’t see myself doing this for years. My lower back and shoulders feel like they’re slowly deteriorating into irreversible damage as the months go on.

I’m conflicted on quitting because although I believe I’m doing fairly well currently financial wise and have no worries about that I feel like I’m throwing away a very good career.

I’m mainly posting this because I’m wondering what my options are going forward. Best case scenario is I’d like to go back to the hub and continue driving part time.

Thank you for reading this far. I hope none of you think I’m just lazy. I believe I’m a very hard worker and that’s what’s even got me this far but I am prioritizing my current and future physical well being.
Quit don’t quit
Literally nobody cares
 
I was thinking the same. Unless he can bid an inside pure 22 job. These are carwash and fueling(here).

It's hard to believe he's breaking down after just 1 year. I don't think I could have lasted 30 years in a pkg car. Just too much lifting and up and down. He's young enough to start over. I hope he has college taken care of. He's screwed on tuition reimbursement now.

Not all hubs have feeder. Downsides of feeder are well documented. He's young enough to become a top hand eventually.

In the end, he only has 1 year full time as I understand it. Not much.

Unless feeder is available....I'd quit.

Maybe....he could quit and get hired as a part-timer again. Not much to lose. And get that tuition reimbursement....
He would also lose his health insurance. And his paid time off the holidays.
And if economy keeps slowing he may not have any work available for him
 

DriverNerd

Well-Known Member
I agree that if you can find something else easier that might be a good solution for you, but if you could hold out for a few years you'll have (hopefully) an opportunity to have your own route. That will make things much easier for you (at least mentally). Plus when your pay is much higher and you aren't being forced 6 days a week it's a lot easier. As mentioned before, Feeders might be a great option for you as well. There's really no downside to Feeders except the crappy work hours and lack of exercise (which is the reason many go into feeders in the first place).

Again, as mentioned before, you need to find a work pace that is constant but not back-breaking. I'm sore everyday I come home, but not "I can't do this anymore" sore.
 

Commercial Inside Release

Well-Known Member
The UPS way of doing business is not going to work out with this generation. He let slip that he has already quit deep down inside, when he said he was happy to realize that UPS isn't the last stop on his career path.

Dealing with physical pain is actually a mental game for the most part. Just wait for management to start the harassment & warning letters, because he doesn't want to play hero, anymore. This is something the new generations are not equipped to deal with... Coercion, mind games, threats, intimidation, bullying, harassment.
 

rickyb

Well-Known Member
Hello, I’m 22 years old and have been a 22.4 driver for close to a year now and looking for advice from fellow UPSers

I started working at UPS when I was 18 and was a loader until I turned 21 and became a 22.4 driver. After the grueling 30 day probation and a couple months of driving I thought I’ve really gotten the hang of things and this was going to be the beginning and the end of my working career. Fast forward to a year later I have had no problems being a proficient driver but the physical toll (thus turning into a mental toll) is starting to weigh on me.

I love being a driver with all the good and bad that comes with it but I’m getting to a point where I don’t think my body can take doing 200-220 stops with 300-350 packages 10h avg every day 5-6 days a week. I know this is the norm for a lot of drivers out there but I can’t see myself doing this for years. My lower back and shoulders feel like they’re slowly deteriorating into irreversible damage as the months go on.

I’m conflicted on quitting because although I believe I’m doing fairly well currently financial wise and have no worries about that I feel like I’m throwing away a very good career.

I’m mainly posting this because I’m wondering what my options are going forward. Best case scenario is I’d like to go back to the hub and continue driving part time.

Thank you for reading this far. I hope none of you think I’m just lazy. I believe I’m a very hard worker and that’s what’s even got me this far but I am prioritizing my current and future physical well being.
try getting your dual citizenship through ancestry and move to EU. north america not so civilized

be a nurse and move
 
There’s millions of jobs out there. Literally.
Yes there is a lot of jobs out there right now
But you need to take many things into consideration

Number one all jobs suck to some degree or other.

But there is not too many lifetime jobs like you have an opportunity that you have here.

This job is not for everyone that is very true

But you need to look at everything.

Outside of government jobs very few places offer a pension anymore especially if you're part time the number is probably almost zero.

Healthcare that's another thing. Many places offered but usually not for free.

He Is a young guy he has his whole life in front of him but he really needs to think that's through.
 
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