New Feeder Driver

Package Stick

"Send it."
As another young guy (25) that just went to feeders don’t sweat it. Accept that you’re the new guy and listen to what the senior drivers tell you. When they help you, return the favor when you can. Most senior drivers are more than willing to answer your questions.

Learn at your own pace from the senior drivers. The guys that cowboy their dolly might be able to tell you how to do it, but that doesn’t mean you should try it for the first time trying to build a set in in the choke point of a busy yard.

You’ll gain respect from the other drivers by showing ability and safety, not speed and recklessness. You already have an advantage by coming to feeders from within and not as an outside hire.

Keep your tractor clean, have some pride in your office especially if you share a tractor.

Double Check everything. Paperwork. IVIS. Hook-ups, etc.

Do it the same way every time and develop muscle memory, especially when building sets.

When you make a mistake, stop and own it. Don’t try to sweep it under the rug or hide it.

Tug test every time. Especially leaving any rest area or truck stop.

If you can’t get a seal on your airlines, a bit a fifth wheel grease off the front lip of the trailer can get you back home.

Good gloves, zip ties, a good flashlight, hammer for knocking tires, glass cleaner, rags, some type of extra layer for rain. Grab a few red tags and keep them in your tractor, even if you don’t have to write anything up, they’re handy to have in case your light cord is loose. Carry a few glad seals and know how to change them.

I have a 12V Radio Transmitter that is nice for being able to listen to your music in the older tractors, even the ones with USBs on the radio don’t always work. I run a CB. A lot of people don’t but I enjoy having it.
Thank you for this!!

I'm prissy about everything.

I know how much responsibility this job is, and I'm ready to own everything.

My family does not like that I do 90% of my car repairs (oil change, brakes, hub assembly, etc), as I do not trust mechanics to ensure that every nut and bolt is secure, and to the proper torque spec.

I'm going to treat this job the exact same way, ensure everything is correct, by the UPS book, twice.
 

nWo

Well-Known Member
Some of the old guys are going to be butthurt that they had to wait 25 years to get a feeder gig when you got in fast. Tell them to suck it.
 

Jones

fILE A GRIEVE!
Staff member
As another young guy (25) that just went to feeders don’t sweat it. Accept that you’re the new guy and listen to what the senior drivers tell you. When they help you, return the favor when you can. Most senior drivers are more than willing to answer your questions.

Learn at your own pace from the senior drivers. The guys that cowboy their dolly might be able to tell you how to do it, but that doesn’t mean you should try it for the first time trying to build a set in in the choke point of a busy yard.

You’ll gain respect from the other drivers by showing ability and safety, not speed and recklessness. You already have an advantage by coming to feeders from within and not as an outside hire.

Keep your tractor clean, have some pride in your office especially if you share a tractor.

Double Check everything. Paperwork. IVIS. Hook-ups, etc.

Do it the same way every time and develop muscle memory, especially when building sets.

When you make a mistake, stop and own it. Don’t try to sweep it under the rug or hide it.

Tug test every time. Especially leaving any rest area or truck stop.

If you can’t get a seal on your airlines, a bit a fifth wheel grease off the front lip of the trailer can get you back home.

Good gloves, zip ties, a good flashlight, hammer for knocking tires, glass cleaner, rags, some type of extra layer for rain. Grab a few red tags and keep them in your tractor, even if you don’t have to write anything up, they’re handy to have in case your light cord is loose. Carry a few glad seals and know how to change them.

I have a 12V Radio Transmitter that is nice for being able to listen to your music in the older tractors, even the ones with USBs on the radio don’t always work. I run a CB. A lot of people don’t but I enjoy having it.
Very good list except for:
"If you can’t get a seal on your airlines, a bit a fifth wheel grease off the front lip of the trailer can get you back home."
For the love of god please don't do this, there's plenty of other ways to get a seal without putting 5th wheel grease on the glad hands. The next guy to use the tractor will thank you.
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
Very good list except for:
"If you can’t get a seal on your airlines, a bit a fifth wheel grease off the front lip of the trailer can get you back home."
For the love of god please don't do this, there's plenty of other ways to get a seal without putting 5th wheel grease on the glad hands. The next guy to use the tractor will thank you.
Well, for the love of God.....do what you have to do to get home.

If you are that concerned about a little grease....then by all means clean it up AFTER you get to the building....hell polish it if you need to.

See, the guys previous used"plenty of other means" and never got the seal repaired and sent it on down the road....to keep it "clean".
 

Wally

BrownCafe Innovator & King of Puns
Thank you for this!!

I'm prissy about everything.

I know how much responsibility this job is, and I'm ready to own everything.

My family does not like that I do 90% of my car repairs (oil change, brakes, hub assembly, etc), as I do not trust mechanics to ensure that every nut and bolt is secure, and to the proper torque spec.

I'm going to treat this job the exact same way, ensure everything is correct, by the UPS book, twice.
Your family doesn't like you doing things yourself? Are they all old money rich?
 

CHEMA-DELMA

Well-Known Member
I never had to work the hub, was hired off the street into package, at that time I had my class "A" prior to the current CDL. I talked to the Feeder mgr about getting into feeders, he said lowest man had 25 years, so I took the tie and became a trainer. IF you can put up with working nights you will enjoy the job. No more "friend" model Mack's with little horsepower the new tractors are very comfortable to drive.
 
Always, always, always check your coupling after leaving sight of your equipment. There are some dirty sons of b* that will pull your pin when you aren’t looking. You better learn quick that a lot of other “professional” drivers HATE us. My father, who is a 30 year driver with another outfit told me to set your hand valve and pull against your brakes to get pressure on your kingpin anytime you are going to walk away from it. This will make it damn near impossible to pull your pin. And even then, check your coupling before you pull off.
Awesome advice
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
Always, always, always check your coupling after leaving sight of your equipment. There are some dirty sons of b* that will pull your pin when you aren’t looking. You better learn quick that a lot of other “professional” drivers HATE us. My father, who is a 30 year driver with another outfit told me to set your hand valve and pull against your brakes to get pressure on your kingpin anytime you are going to walk away from it. This will make it damn near impossible to pull your pin. And even then, check your coupling before you pull off.
We have UPS people that do this to our own drivers. Know of two guys fired for this.
 

Yeet

Float up, double down
We have UPS people that do this to our own drivers. Know of two guys fired for this.
Completely unacceptable. They should consider themselves lucky that all they got was fired. If I ever catch somebody in the act of pulling my pin, they are going to fire both of us.
 

quad decade guy

Well-Known Member
Completely unacceptable. They should consider themselves lucky that all they got was fired. If I ever catch somebody in the act of pulling my pin, they are going to fire both of us.
Ok....but I wouldn't lose my job over it......go for it. Heck go to jail over it.....seems a bit silly.
 
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