Should Or shouldn’t GFT disciplinary letter(on topic)

GFT letter?


  • Total voters
    9

GrimmTech

Member
Long story short, employee terminated for failure to report accident. It was GFT’d. Employee continued to lie about even having accident. Until video evidence showed accident and employee stopping to remove debris from truck. Finally came clean during GFT , while also accusing manager of gender discrimination/targeting as last ditch effort to bring him down/retaliation.Termination upheld. Fast forward 3wks later ,I receive calls from HR rep who is now doing internal EEOC, on manager. Fast forward another month and manager received disciplinary letter stating in violation of P2-5(code of conduct) and P5-55(anti-harassment) specifically made inappropriate and unprofessional comments toward employee that reports directly to them.

Just little background info; employee never once in all years working for mngr called HR with any claims of harassment or gender discrimination etc....until fired.
Never received any negative OLCC counseling’s from the accused mngr,in fact only thing in OLCC file from manager are compliments.
Ex-employees “witness” to comments that were never made in first place is a fellow employee who also happens to be the future spouse of fired employee. Can anybody say it with me, not an impartial unbiased witness.

Here’s my 2 cents it seems like manger in question is being left high and dry by legal. That HR investigator did a shotty and unthorough job.(btw said rep is known around office as being incompetent).In the event that ex-employee files a formal EEOC with the Government FedEx has covered their asses with the disciplinary letter to mngr.

I have urged this mngr to file his own GFT for the disciplinary letter. First and foremost the allegations are not true and are coming from a known liar and anyone with half a brain should be able to read between lines and conclude it is retaliation for being fired.Secondly that letter will be permanently in his file. Thirdly internal EEOC investigation was done by an idiot. And at time of EEOC mngr in question was on FMLA (broken foot,unrelated to work) so all responses to questions from HR rep were over phone,who’s to say what the HR rep actually wrote down.

Different opinion on matter?Thoughts,comments,suggestions?? What to include,or not include in GFT? Should mngr just let it go and accept the letter?
 

Operational needs

Virescit Vulnere Virtus
Long story short, employee terminated for failure to report accident. It was GFT’d. Employee continued to lie about even having accident. Until video evidence showed accident and employee stopping to remove debris from truck. Finally came clean during GFT , while also accusing manager of gender discrimination/targeting as last ditch effort to bring him down/retaliation.Termination upheld. Fast forward 3wks later ,I receive calls from HR rep who is now doing internal EEOC, on manager. Fast forward another month and manager received disciplinary letter stating in violation of P2-5(code of conduct) and P5-55(anti-harassment) specifically made inappropriate and unprofessional comments toward employee that reports directly to them.

Just little background info; employee never once in all years working for mngr called HR with any claims of harassment or gender discrimination etc....until fired.
Never received any negative OLCC counseling’s from the accused mngr,in fact only thing in OLCC file from manager are compliments.
Ex-employees “witness” to comments that were never made in first place is a fellow employee who also happens to be the future spouse of fired employee. Can anybody say it with me, not an impartial unbiased witness.

Here’s my 2 cents it seems like manger in question is being left high and dry by legal. That HR investigator did a shotty and unthorough job.(btw said rep is known around office as being incompetent).In the event that ex-employee files a formal EEOC with the Government FedEx has covered their asses with the disciplinary letter to mngr.

I have urged this mngr to file his own GFT for the disciplinary letter. First and foremost the allegations are not true and are coming from a known liar and anyone with half a brain should be able to read between lines and conclude it is retaliation for being fired.Secondly that letter will be permanently in his file. Thirdly internal EEOC investigation was done by an idiot. And at time of EEOC mngr in question was on FMLA (broken foot,unrelated to work) so all responses to questions from HR rep were over phone,who’s to say what the HR rep actually wrote down.

Different opinion on matter?Thoughts,comments,suggestions?? What to include,or not include in GFT? Should mngr just let it go and accept the letter?
Your HR rep sounds like mine. You must be in the Capital District. Lol.
 

bacha29

Well-Known Member
It's a nonunion shop and it looks like the labor group tired of being cuffed around, tired of being treated like second class citizens are standing up for themselves and are starting to hit back. If a few managers get caught in the crossfire...that's too bad but there's plenty more where they come from.
Nobody wants to do physical work anymore. Everybody wants to sit behind a desk and be a "manager".In a company where it's every man (or woman) for himself there will be casualties and people have to accept the fact that they could find themselves included in the daily body count.
 

Oldfart

Well-Known Member
Why has the manager chosen to disclose so much information to you? The policy violation of his letter and all. Sounds like he needs to make their own decisions and not involve people under them in his disciplinary problems. Seems like if you were interviewed about him and it was found out he was discussing too much information with you, that could look bad on both of you.

Dano is the policy expert. Get his opinion.
 

Oldfart

Well-Known Member
It's a nonunion shop and it looks like the labor group tired of being cuffed around, tired of being treated like second class citizens are standing up for themselves and are starting to hit back. If a few managers get caught in the crossfire...that's too bad but there's plenty more where they come from.
Nobody wants to do physical work anymore. Everybody wants to sit behind a desk and be a "manager".In a company where it's every man (or woman) for himself there will be casualties and people have to accept the fact that they could find themselves included in the daily body count.
LOL

What does your post have to do with the original question?
 

Indecisi0n

Well-Known Member
Long story short, employee terminated for failure to report accident. It was GFT’d. Employee continued to lie about even having accident. Until video evidence showed accident and employee stopping to remove debris from truck. Finally came clean during GFT , while also accusing manager of gender discrimination/targeting as last ditch effort to bring him down/retaliation.Termination upheld. Fast forward 3wks later ,I receive calls from HR rep who is now doing internal EEOC, on manager. Fast forward another month and manager received disciplinary letter stating in violation of P2-5(code of conduct) and P5-55(anti-harassment) specifically made inappropriate and unprofessional comments toward employee that reports directly to them.

Just little background info; employee never once in all years working for mngr called HR with any claims of harassment or gender discrimination etc....until fired.
Never received any negative OLCC counseling’s from the accused mngr,in fact only thing in OLCC file from manager are compliments.
Ex-employees “witness” to comments that were never made in first place is a fellow employee who also happens to be the future spouse of fired employee. Can anybody say it with me, not an impartial unbiased witness.

Here’s my 2 cents it seems like manger in question is being left high and dry by legal. That HR investigator did a shotty and unthorough job.(btw said rep is known around office as being incompetent).In the event that ex-employee files a formal EEOC with the Government FedEx has covered their asses with the disciplinary letter to mngr.

I have urged this mngr to file his own GFT for the disciplinary letter. First and foremost the allegations are not true and are coming from a known liar and anyone with half a brain should be able to read between lines and conclude it is retaliation for being fired.Secondly that letter will be permanently in his file. Thirdly internal EEOC investigation was done by an idiot. And at time of EEOC mngr in question was on FMLA (broken foot,unrelated to work) so all responses to questions from HR rep were over phone,who’s to say what the HR rep actually wrote down.

Different opinion on matter?Thoughts,comments,suggestions?? What to include,or not include in GFT? Should mngr just let it go and accept the letter?
That was the short version?!
 

GrimmTech

Member
Why has the manager chosen to disclose so much information to you? The policy violation of his letter and all. Sounds like he needs to make their own decisions and not involve people under them in his disciplinary problems. Seems like if you were interviewed about him and it was found out he was discussing too much information with you, that could look bad on both of you.

Dano is the policy expert. Get his opinion.

Manager hasn’t involved people under him, I’ve never specified my position. Mngr disclosed to me because mngr needed advice. I’m not concerned about having discussed the matter. I answered HR honestly. We had not previously discussed what was going on until the disciplinary letter. Where I was given the nitty gritty. It was common knowledge around the station and not to hard to deduce who and what HR was investigating ,the guy is not real subtle.

I’ve posted on here for advice/ ideas or possibly vindication that I’m not only one thinking mngr should GFT. Mngr is concerned ...if mngr just lets it go will it come back to haunt? If goes GFT route will Senior Mngr, District Mngr put this Mngr in the “making problems “ category because wouldn’t let it go.
 

Cactus

Just telling it like it is
Cactus never had a good manager. Bad couriers usually had management breathing down their neck due to poor performance. Then they want to blame management.

:shutupsmiley:

I’m shure you’re the biggest butt kisser at your station, hands down. Knees down too.
 

Operational needs

Virescit Vulnere Virtus
There are SOME good ones yes, but unfortunately the bad ones outnumber them these days. If a manager plays fair, then he or she should expect the same. Same goes for when they don’t. See?
A lot of “unfairness” is all a matter of perception. For instance, a guy I work with was directly instructed by his Mgr to be back one night by a set time. Mgr even had him repeat the time (because the guy likes to buck the system). The guy came back an hour later than instructed and got upset because he was written up. Thought the Mgr was unfair.
 
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