What is the Twilight shift like?

PTPunchingBag

Well-Known Member
My building is too small for a twilight shift. We only have preload and the metro. Is the twilight shift similar to the metro? Loading trailers, filling bags etc.?
 

A good guy

Well-Known Member
My building is too small for a twilight shift. We only have preload and the metro. Is the twilight shift similar to the metro? Loading trailers, filling bags etc.?

-unloading packages cars
-unloading trailers
-loading destination trailers
-no time limit to finish (no midnight sort in our building)
-no drivers yelling at you
Was pretty chill. Full time sups never really cared about when to get done when I worked twilight.
 

JustDeliverIt

Well-Known Member
We have Twi, Night and Preload in my building. Twi unloads package cars and starts the loading of trailers. Night finishes the the outbound and a little unloading of preload work. Preload gets the package cars out the door.
 

BiggieBrown

Well-Known Member
Basically you have to stick around and clean up the drivers' mess.
You're supposed to unload the package cars, load the trailer, then fuel, wash, and park.
The drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.
Then, after taking their keys home with them, they lose them and claim you have them. Then you get called 7 times at 5 AM by the preload sup screaming at you about how you took the keys and you need to bring them up there now.
Twilight gets :censored2: on more than any other shift.

Also when it's 12 degrees outside you get to wash every car in the center.
Imagine spraying the side of a truck, having it immediately turn to ice, and then scrubbing the layer of ice that is protecting the layer of dirt underneath. It's like a form of torture.
 

PT Car Washer

Well-Known Member
Basically you have to stick around and clean up the drivers' mess.
You're supposed to unload the package cars, load the trailer, then fuel, wash, and park.
The drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.
Then, after taking their keys home with them, they lose them and claim you have them. Then you get called 7 times at 5 AM by the preload sup screaming at you about how you took the keys and you need to bring them up there now.
Twilight gets :censored2: on more than any other shift.

Also when it's 12 degrees outside you get to wash every car in the center.
Imagine spraying the side of a truck, having it immediately turn to ice, and then scrubbing the layer of ice that is protecting the layer of dirt underneath. It's like a form of torture.
My building solved most of these problems by making the drivers fuel and wash their package cars. Of course most of them just blow it off especially fueling if they are a split driver who drives a different truck everyday. Keys used to be a big problem but now that we have the fobs it is still a big problem. Now if we could just get the drivers to do a proper pretrip or at least check the oil level. Pretty sure the package car I drive did not use 7 quarts of oil in 1 day.
 

Analbumcover

ControlPkgs
he drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.

What you don't realize is that we plan it out that way to make your night more interesting. If you're going to be making barely-above minimum wage, you should at least be miserable doing it.
 

ManInBrown

Well-Known Member
Basically you have to stick around and clean up the drivers' mess.
You're supposed to unload the package cars, load the trailer, then fuel, wash, and park.
The drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.
Then, after taking their keys home with them, they lose them and claim you have them. Then you get called 7 times at 5 AM by the preload sup screaming at you about how you took the keys and you need to bring them up there now.
Twilight gets :censored2: on more than any other shift.

Also when it's 12 degrees outside you get to wash every car in the center.
Imagine spraying the side of a truck, having it immediately turn to ice, and then scrubbing the layer of ice that is protecting the layer of dirt underneath. It's like a form of torture.

Post of the year
 

DriveInDriveOut

Proud Deplorable
The drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.
Then, after taking their keys home with them, they lose them and claim you have them.
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UPSER1987

Well-Known Member
Basically you have to stick around and clean up the drivers' mess.
You're supposed to unload the package cars, load the trailer, then fuel, wash, and park.
The drivers make this 10 times more difficult by leaving their trucks scattered all over the yard and then taking their keys home with them. They're like toddlers. No matter how many times they are told to do something simple like line up their trucks or leave the keys they are too retarded to do it. Getting a driver to do something tiny that would help you out is like trying to teach a chimp calculus.
Then, after taking their keys home with them, they lose them and claim you have them. Then you get called 7 times at 5 AM by the preload sup screaming at you about how you took the keys and you need to bring them up there now.
Twilight gets :censored2: on more than any other shift.

Also when it's 12 degrees outside you get to wash every car in the center.
Imagine spraying the side of a truck, having it immediately turn to ice, and then scrubbing the layer of ice that is protecting the layer of dirt underneath. It's like a form of torture.

The toddler part made me laugh! So true
 

trailer loader

Trailer Loader
Depends on the hub and job description i guess, in my hub, twilight is 530-1030ish or finish, night sort is supposed to start at 1045, We have trailer loaders, unloaders, small sorts, and guys that unload the PC as they come in, on my belt i have 2nd highest seniority so i dont stay much later than 9-930 unless its extremely busy as this past week was. or if i want to,
 

LarryBird

Well-Known Member
10! haha, and have no issue with it, haha
Wow, it's really fallen that far with retention rate for part-timers? The 2cd highest guy in an area has 10 lousy months of seniority? It used to be bad in my building, but not that bad. For every guy that quit when I worked inside, it seems like another one of the guys I worked the sort with is full-time now, and has been with UPS approaching 20 years. There's other guys I worked the sort with who are approaching 30 to 40 years as PT insiders at my building as well, that never went driving or tried it and went back inside.

We had a good bit of new hire turnover, but the people who didn't immediately quit within the week, tended to stick around forever, and like I said, still work there in most instances in my experience.
 

BiggieBrown

Well-Known Member
I have a year of seniority and I was the top dawg on my shift (besides the customer counter lady who's been there for like 35 years)
People either quit at the end of the first day, or they stay for like 3 months and then leave when they realize their body is starting to hurt already.
 

LarryBird

Well-Known Member
I have a year of seniority and I was the top dawg on my shift (besides the customer counter lady who's been there for like 35 years)
That's nuts.

In my building you'd be near low man on the totem pole in every area but the load, and you'd be a lower seniority guy there too, I believe.

They're out of people on the sorts who want to drive around here for the most part. They're hiring drivers off the street more than inside guys for years now. Our building is full of inside lifers who aren't going anywhere. They have really high paying PT second jobs with full bennies and pension, so I don't exactly blame them.
 

trailer loader

Trailer Loader
Wow, it's really fallen that far with retention rate for part-timers? The 2cd highest guy in an area has 10 lousy months of seniority? It used to be bad in my building, but not that bad. For every guy that quit when I worked inside, it seems like another one of the guys I worked the sort with is full-time now, and has been with UPS approaching 20 years. There's other guys I worked the sort with who are approaching 30 to 40 years as PT insiders at my building as well, that never went driving or tried it and went back inside.

We had a good bit of new hire turnover, but the people who didn't immediately quit within the week, tended to stick around forever, and like I said, still work there in most instances in my experience.

the reason i have 2nd highest seniority on my belt is because, 1 loader went driving, 1 is out on disability and the 3rd went to shifting, I would have highest seniority but they pulled another guy from a different belt to replace one of those that left, the others were replaced by people hired after me, and yes, our retention rate is horrible, new hires come if for a few weeks or less, and decide to quit or get fired.
 
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