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Ancient Alien

UPS Vacation
Jun 27
Supreme Court rules in favor of non-union workers who are now, as an example, able to support a candidate of his or her choice without having those who control the Union deciding for them. Big loss for the coffers of the Democrats!
 

Ancient Alien

UPS Vacation
Reagan fires 11,000 striking air traffic controllers Aug. 5, 1981

By ANDREW GLASS


08/05/2008 04:30 AM EDT

On this day in 1981, President Ronald Reagan fired more than 11,000 air traffic controllers who ignored his order to return to work. The sweeping mass firing of federal employees slowed commercial air travel, but it did not cripple the system as the strikers had forecast.

Two days earlier, nearly 13,000 controllers walked out after talks with the Federal Aviation Administration collapsed. As a result, some 7,000 flights across the country were canceled on that day at the peak of the summer travel season.
Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization, sought an across-the-board annual wage increase of $10,000 for the controllers, whose pay ranged from $20,462 to $49,229 per year. He also sought a reduction of their five-day, 40-hour workweek to a four-day, 32-hour workweek. The FAA made a $40 million counteroffer, far short of the $770 million package that the union sought.

Reagan branded the strike illegal. He threatened to fire any controller who failed to return to work within 48 hours. Federal judges levied fines of $1 million per day against the union.

In 1955, Congress made such strikes punishable by fines or a one-year jail term — a law the Supreme Court upheld in 1971.

To the chagrin of the strikers, the FAA’s contingency plans worked. Some 3,000 supervisors joined 2,000 nonstriking controllers and 900 military controllers in manning airport towers. Before long, about 80 percent of flights were operating normally. Air freight remained virtually unaffected.

In carrying out his threat, Reagan also imposed a lifetime ban on rehiring the strikers. In October 1981, the Federal Labor Relations Authority decertified PATCO.
 

Ancient Alien

UPS Vacation
I've read the arguments of what Reagan did doesn't relate to UPS/Teamster's with President Trump.

Are you sure about that?

Donald covets those job numbers. 260,000 strikers won't settle well with him unless he can quickly get replacement workers and could salvage the USPS losses.

Think about it...
 

Ancient Alien

UPS Vacation
Old timers are correct when they say that most of the public supported UPS workers in 1997.

Today is different. The public is not near as jovial seeing their UPS driver for several reasons. Less customer contact time today. In the 90's folks would order out of catalogs and the shipping window time was often 4-6 weeks and when it arrived in 15-days they'd come out of their shop elated to see you. Nowadays they order dog food on their Amazon Prime account on Sunday and it arrives Thursday and ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE! Back in the 90's... very, very few deliveries nationwide were delivered after 7:30pm... nowadays some loops are set up to deliver after 6:30pm every day.

Yet, here's the biggest difference that none of you here even think about. In 1997, UPS was private. It went public in 1999 and NOW corporate is persuaded heavily by Wall Street. Large institutions control the direction and WALL STREET HATES UNIONS.

This isn't me saying this... it's the truth. Don't shoot the UPS Messenger!

Sleep on it...
 

silverbullet2893

KILL KILL!!
Old timers are correct when they say that most of the public supported UPS workers in 1997.

Today is different. The public is not near as jovial seeing their UPS driver for several reasons. Less customer contact time today. In the 90's folks would order out of catalogs and the shipping window time was often 4-6 weeks and when it arrived in 15-days they'd come out of their shop elated to see you. Nowadays they order dog food on their Amazon Prime account on Sunday and it arrives Thursday and ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE! Back in the 90's... very, very few deliveries nationwide were delivered after 7:30pm... nowadays some loops are set up to deliver after 6:30pm every day.

Yet, here's the biggest difference that none of you here even think about. In 1997, UPS was private. It went public in 1999 and NOW corporate is persuaded heavily by Wall Street. Large institutions control the direction and WALL STREET HATES UNIONS.

This isn't me saying this... it's the truth. Don't shoot the UPS Messenger!

Sleep on it...

Stfu
 

Jones

fILE A GRIEVE!
Staff member
Breaking the Teamster's Union would be a big feather in his cap and would play very well with his base.
 

Benben

Working on a new degree, Masters in BS Detecting!
Old timers are correct when they say that most of the public supported UPS workers in 1997.

Today is different. The public is not near as jovial seeing their UPS driver for several reasons. Less customer contact time today
You really are not a driver are you? You are so out of touch with reality its unbelievable! We just saw all the teachers get massive support in 5 different states during their strikes and walkouts. I wish you the best Fitbit App, you are 1 very delusional idiot!
 

Ancient Alien

UPS Vacation
I understand my brothers & sisters saying these 22.4 jobs will be manipulated and will weaken the union over the long-term. I do understand that argument.

Truthfully, unions are struggling now across the nation and not just Teamster's. A lot of unions are hurting. These 22.4 jobs will mean more union members and it strengthens the pension. I'm happy at least all of us here won't be a 22.4 driver.

Is it a step back? I think it is... yet, a walkout would be a much worse option imo. As your brother you all should afford me the right to see how bad this could be.

Not a soul here doesn't think about #1 inside. I know that...

So join me by STRENGTHENING our pensions... a Yes vote means you want the union pensions back in the green!

Don't be a union buster and vote no because you worked a few 60 hour weeks last December. You gotta push that s*** outta your mind.

Man up!!!

SUPPORT THE HANDSHAKE FROM YOUR UNION LEADERSHIP!

No Nancy's allowed. *waving you in*

Join me Brother! Let's light this candle and bring out the dancing girls & put the champagne on ice!
 

eats packages

The best driver to never drive.
[QUOTE="Fitbit App :), post: 3612445, member: 70963" ]Ronald Reagan was a crappy president, join DSA if you want to know more.[/QUOTE]
Would you like to know that not one but two separate sets of planes almost crashed during the time Reagan fired the old air traffic controllers? Or that there was a contributing factor in one crash that killed 71 people? The remaining members unionized shortly afterwords. You could say everything was back to normal 10 years later until a concession filled contract two years ago appears to have set the stage for a new round union-busting action.
 

eats packages

The best driver to never drive.
It would be a shame if republicans accidentally inherited a base of pro-union members and tore both parties into pieces.
 

Wrong

The Great Deliverer
Reagan fires 11,000 striking air traffic controllers Aug. 5, 1981

By ANDREW GLASS


08/05/2008 04:30 AM EDT

On this day in 1981, President Ronald Reagan fired more than 11,000 air traffic controllers who ignored his order to return to work. The sweeping mass firing of federal employees slowed commercial air travel, but it did not cripple the system as the strikers had forecast.

Two days earlier, nearly 13,000 controllers walked out after talks with the Federal Aviation Administration collapsed. As a result, some 7,000 flights across the country were canceled on that day at the peak of the summer travel season.
Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization, sought an across-the-board annual wage increase of $10,000 for the controllers, whose pay ranged from $20,462 to $49,229 per year. He also sought a reduction of their five-day, 40-hour workweek to a four-day, 32-hour workweek. The FAA made a $40 million counteroffer, far short of the $770 million package that the union sought.

Reagan branded the strike illegal. He threatened to fire any controller who failed to return to work within 48 hours. Federal judges levied fines of $1 million per day against the union.

In 1955, Congress made such strikes punishable by fines or a one-year jail term — a law the Supreme Court upheld in 1971.

To the chagrin of the strikers, the FAA’s contingency plans worked. Some 3,000 supervisors joined 2,000 nonstriking controllers and 900 military controllers in manning airport towers. Before long, about 80 percent of flights were operating normally. Air freight remained virtually unaffected.

In carrying out his threat, Reagan also imposed a lifetime ban on rehiring the strikers. In October 1981, the Federal Labor Relations Authority decertified PATCO.
 
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