On topic. Recently resigned. How do I access my 401k for rollover/cash out?

Big Brown Oddie

New Member
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
 

zubenelgenubi

Living for Lunch Break
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.

It's been a while since I've done it, but I think the financial firm that manages your IRA handles the rollover. Ask them what they need from you, such as your 401k account number, etc.
 

brownmonster

Man of Great Wisdom
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
You can log in to the 401k site directly. It doesn't have to be through UPSers.
 
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
Screenshot_20190205-100947.png
 

Jkloc420

Do you need an air compressor or tire gauge
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
You will not lose it and can't do anything until it registers with prudential you are no longer employeed
 

Been In Brown Too Long

Ex-Package Donkey
If you haven't set up your Prudential account previously, how were you managing your 401k in the first place? You will not lose it. It stays there until you do something with it. I retired in April, but was only 49, so I can't withdraw for a while, but can still manage what's in there via the Prudential site. That same site is where the pension is administered (at least here in the west). I also still can access upsers.com. Funny they pulled the plug on you that quickly. You should still be able to create an account on the Prudential website with some personal information. Here's the link... https://www.prudential.com/registration#/ret
All you need to create the online account is last four of your ss#, your d.o.b. and your zip code.
 

Jrodri

New Member
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
Call prudential if you are no longer working for ups they will send you your 401 but they take 20% for federal
 

1980wizard

New Member
I recently resigned and was pretty quickly locked out of the online system. Now, I'm trying to figure out how to access my 401k, (so I can cash out or rollover to an IRA) as I am no longer able to log in & access my online info. Any direction would be appreciated. Resigning wasn't an easy decision, Lost so much, can't imagine losing this too.
Contact Prudential at 1-800-778-4357 first to get into your account on line. 1-800-537-0189 is their number for all other situations. If you are not 59 1/2 you cannot roll it over to another account elsewhere without a 10% penalty. Prudential’s fees are more reasonable than if you were a single customer with a money manager due to it’s size. You won’t get personal attention, but it’s cheaper. You’ll have to do research on your own.
 

oldngray

nowhere special
Contact Prudential at 1-800-778-4357 first to get into your account on line. 1-800-537-0189 is their number for all other situations. If you are not 59 1/2 you cannot roll it over to another account elsewhere without a 10% penalty. Prudential’s fees are more reasonable than if you were a single customer with a money manager due to it’s size. You won’t get personal attention, but it’s cheaper. You’ll have to do research on your own.
You absolutely can roll it over without penalty as long as it is into another retirement account. Age doesn't matter as long as you no longer work at UPS. As long as it is a tradition plan and not a Roth. I rolled over my 401k into an IRA when I retired.
 

zubenelgenubi

Living for Lunch Break
Contact Prudential at 1-800-778-4357 first to get into your account on line. 1-800-537-0189 is their number for all other situations. If you are not 59 1/2 you cannot roll it over to another account elsewhere without a 10% penalty. Prudential’s fees are more reasonable than if you were a single customer with a money manager due to it’s size. You won’t get personal attention, but it’s cheaper. You’ll have to do research on your own.

You absolutely can roll it over without penalty as long as it is into another retirement account. Age doesn't matter as long as you no longer work at UPS. As long as it is a tradition plan and not a Roth. I rolled over my 401k into an IRA when I retired.

Even more, you can roll it over into a regular IRA with no penalty, then, in the 5th calendar year after that roll over, you can roll over into a Roth penalty free. That is, unless the rules have changed.
 

Old Man Jingles

Rat out of a cage
Even more, you can roll it over into a regular IRA with no penalty, then, in the 5th calendar year after that roll over, you can roll over into a Roth penalty free. That is, unless the rules have changed.
Wish it was that easy!
Going from a traditional IRA to a ROTH has tax implications albeit none that would be classified as a penalty.
It was going to cost me north of $50k when I ran my numbers some 20 years ago.

The Rule of Thumb at that time was even if you had $50k just sitting around, age 42 was the threshold to convert-or-not.
Age 42 or less was a signal to covert.
I remember now, I was 45 so I did not do a thorough analysis and I did not convert.

Ask me in 7 years if I think I made the right decision! :sweating:

I absolutely loath giving any extra to the National Government.
 

Popeye

Well-Known Member
Wish it was that easy!
Going from a traditional IRA to a ROTH has tax implications albeit none that would be classified as a penalty.
It was going to cost me north of $50k when I ran my numbers some 20 years ago.

The Rule of Thumb at that time was even if you had $50k just sitting around, age 42 was the threshold to convert-or-not.
Age 42 or less was a signal to covert.
I remember now, I was 45 so I did not do a thorough analysis and I did not convert.

Ask me in 7 years if I think I made the right decision! :sweating:

I absolutely loath giving any extra to the National Government.

You don't have to convert all at once. You can wait util you're retired and in a lower marginal rate bracket. Only convert enough each year to stay in a lower bracket and spread it out. A lot of factors go into determining whether this makes sense. High probability of tax rate increases, getting slammed with RMDs pushing you into a higher bracket when you hit 70, your anticipated rate of return on the converted funds in the Roth, how long you expect to live, etc.
 

oldngray

nowhere special
You don't have to convert all at once. You can wait util you're retired and in a lower marginal rate bracket. Only convert enough each year to stay in a lower bracket and spread it out. A lot of factors go into determining whether this makes sense. High probability of tax rate increases, getting slammed with RMDs pushing you into a higher bracket when you hit 70, your anticipated rate of return on the converted funds in the Roth, how long you expect to live, etc.
Whether or when to convert depends of the individual's situation. Sometimes makes sense but not always.
 
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