Part-Time AM Air driver question.

Hey! I finished Integrad for a Bid Air Driver position, first shift starts at 0600, wondering if any other air drivers can give me details further on the job? First time working for UPS, but I've been browsing browncafe for a while now so I am familiar with most topics. Thanks!
 

KearsargeCoop

Well-Known Member
You will be going to the airport and fetching air I assume?

Pretty straight forward, in my experience.
Line package car up, put park brake on shift to park, chalk wheels. Place cones at end of wing, hatch and tail wing.
Follow back up commands, unload plane, drive back to center.
 
You will be going to the airport and fetching air I assume?

Pretty straight forward, in my experience.
Line package car up, put park brake on shift to park, chalk wheels. Place cones at end of wing, hatch and tail wing.
Follow back up commands, unload plane, drive back to center.
I believe I'm working at the airport as that is where I met my supervisor and did a small warehouse walk-through, he also roughly described a morning, that I would be loading my own package car as packages come straight off the planes onto the belts and doing the air deliveries. I wanted more info from other air drivers to see if this is similar to what they may be doing.
 

PT Car Washer

Well-Known Member
Hey! I finished Integrad for a Bid Air Driver position, first shift starts at 0600, wondering if any other air drivers can give me details further on the job? First time working for UPS, but I've been browsing browncafe for a while now so I am familiar with most topics. Thanks!
I assume you will be delivering Early AM packages. 8:00AM commit time for most. Our air drivers report to the Hub and find package cars to drive to the airport where they receive their delivery assignments. Or your package cars could be at the airport. Deliver packages and see if there is anymore work delivering 10:30 or 12:00 commit air packages. Occasionally there could be some ground delivery or pick ups available at top ground driver rate. Over $41/hr.
 

hondo

promoted to mediocrity
First things first, always make sure you have enough fuel & washer fluid (around here the air vans typically get used by 3 different drivers per day: AM air drvr, On-road supe during the day, PM air drvr). Make sure to find out if you will be responsible for underhood pre-trip (fluid levels), and where to refuel/ add DEF (for diesel powered vans), get other fluids, cleaning supplies, etc.

If you're going to the airport, make sure you know the 'prescribed' travel path and any possible alternate routes. Ask your mgmnt if you'll need to be trained/certified/registered by the airfield staff, and if you'll need to do any sorting of pkgs at the airport (such as keeping the EAMs separate in the load).

As far as delivering, find out if your center uses EDD/ORION for the air drivers, or just prints out the pkg forecast and let's you route yourself.
 
If you're going to the airport, make sure you know the 'prescribed' travel path and any possible alternate routes. Ask your mgmnt if you'll need to be trained/certified/registered by the airfield staff, and if you'll need to do any sorting of pkgs at the airport (such as keeping the EAMs separate in the load.
In regards to this, I believe that the location mainly does air deliveries as it has the planes park right out of the location 300ft from the exit of the package car entrance/exit. They also have some vehicles that park on the opposite side of the belt to load packages for other hubs. I only saw 1 loading belt if that helps gauge the size of this warehouse.

Secondly:
What should day-to-day look like? I want to be informed so as to not have any surprises when I begin.
 

burrheadd

KING Of GIFS
I believe I'm working at the airport as that is where I met my supervisor and did a small warehouse walk-through, he also roughly described a morning, that I would be loading my own package car as packages come straight off the planes onto the belts and doing the air deliveries. I wanted more info from other air drivers to see if this is similar to what they may be doing.

You got an airport pas
 

hondo

promoted to mediocrity
In regards to this, I believe that the location mainly does air deliveries as it has the planes park right out of the location 300ft from the exit of the package car entrance/exit. They also have some vehicles that park on the opposite side of the belt to load packages for other hubs. I only saw 1 loading belt if that helps gauge the size of this warehouse.

Secondly:
What should day-to-day look like? I want to be informed so as to not have any surprises when I begin.
I believe I'm working at the airport as that is where I met my supervisor and did a small warehouse walk-through, he also roughly described a morning, that I would be loading my own package car as packages come straight off the planes onto the belts and doing the air deliveries. I wanted more info from other air drivers to see if this is similar to what they may be doing.
Well assuming you are working from the airport, find out if you will have your own delivery area initially (for your 30(?) day qualifying) and try to get granular details about it. How are the delivery areas broken down; by city/town or zip code? Find out who the regular customers are, especially those with strict security procedures (for example I've had to make contact by intercom or phone, wait for door to unlock or open, pull inside building/loading dock/get all pkgs for delivery, sign in with security (even been photographed), trade my work ID badge for electronic key card, then make my way to delivery point (elevator to mail room) then reverse the process to get out), possible/probable traffic problems in the area (rail crossings/road construction/etc). Get phone numbers of other drivers. Pay attention to your local news for any events that might directly or indirectly affect your morning (such as trade shows or conventions).

There should be a supervisor with you for your first 2-3 days, but between the changes from our latest CEO and COVID, who knows? Or if s/he will be of any use?

Might be a good idea to learn where those other hubs are (addresses/directions) in case you end up having to shuttle their to them (if you do, make sure you find out where specifically you need to go on their property).

Are you going to be M-Fri, Tues-Sat, or Mon-Sat
 
Well assuming you are working from the airport, find out if you will have your own delivery area initially (for your 30(?) day qualifying) and try to get granular details about it. How are the delivery areas broken down; by city/town or zip code? Find out who the regular customers are, especially those with strict security procedures (for example I've had to make contact by intercom or phone, wait for door to unlock or open, pull inside building/loading dock/get all pkgs for delivery, sign in with security (even been photographed), trade my work ID badge for electronic key card, then make my way to delivery point (elevator to mail room) then reverse the process to get out), possible/probable traffic problems in the area (rail crossings/road construction/etc). Get phone numbers of other drivers. Pay attention to your local news for any events that might directly or indirectly affect your morning (such as trade shows or conventions).

There should be a supervisor with you for your first 2-3 days, but between the changes from our latest CEO and COVID, who knows? Or if s/he will be of any use?

Might be a good idea to learn where those other hubs are (addresses/directions) in case you end up having to shuttle their to them (if you do, make sure you find out where specifically you need to go on their property).

Are you going to be M-Fri, Tues-Sat, or Mon-Sat
Tue-sat is what sup said when I met them.
 
TSA (TWIC?). I don't think you need it for delivering from airport (pkgs coming off the plane), just for pickups that are going onto the plane.
I don't believe I would need that, I shouldn't be going onto the tarmac nor near any planes. Only indoors around package cars. the location isn't part of the main airport either, it's the outer edge of the runways. went through UPS security gate only.
 

burrheadd

KING Of GIFS
I don't believe I would need that, I shouldn't be going onto the tarmac nor near any planes. Only indoors around package cars. the location isn't part of the main airport either, it's the outer edge of the runways. went through UPS security gate only.

If you are inside tsa security you will need one
Here anybody whose regular job takes them inside tsa security needs one
 
If you are inside tsa security you will need one
Here anybody whose regular job takes them inside tsa security needs one
Never went near TSA, only UPS security. The main airport is centered around the runways, the location I report to is on the outskirts of the runways alongside other businesses that operate planes i.e. pilot schools.


edit: I may still have this confused though, but this is info ill gladly accept :).
 

PT Car Washer

Well-Known Member
Well assuming you are working from the airport, find out if you will have your own delivery area initially (for your 30(?) day qualifying) and try to get granular details about it. How are the delivery areas broken down; by city/town or zip code? Find out who the regular customers are, especially those with strict security procedures (for example I've had to make contact by intercom or phone, wait for door to unlock or open, pull inside building/loading dock/get all pkgs for delivery, sign in with security (even been photographed), trade my work ID badge for electronic key card, then make my way to delivery point (elevator to mail room) then reverse the process to get out), possible/probable traffic problems in the area (rail crossings/road construction/etc). Get phone numbers of other drivers. Pay attention to your local news for any events that might directly or indirectly affect your morning (such as trade shows or conventions).

There should be a supervisor with you for your first 2-3 days, but between the changes from our latest CEO and COVID, who knows? Or if s/he will be of any use?

Might be a good idea to learn where those other hubs are (addresses/directions) in case you end up having to shuttle their to them (if you do, make sure you find out where specifically you need to go on their property).

Are you going to be M-Fri, Tues-Sat, or Mon-Sat
Wow. Our EAM drivers normally go out with 2 or 3 stops. Only have an hour to get them all off before the commit time.
 

hondo

promoted to mediocrity
Never went near TSA, only UPS security. The main airport is centered around the runways, the location I report to is on the outskirts of the runways alongside other businesses that operate planes i.e. pilot schools.


edit: I may still have this confused though, but this is info ill gladly accept :).
Among other things, the TWIC application process includes fingerprinting. It's a 'secure biometric credential' for 'transportation workers with unsecured access to secure facilities', i.e. loading air (and marine) cargo.
 

hondo

promoted to mediocrity
Wow. Our EAM drivers normally go out with 2 or 3 stops. Only have an hour to get them all off before the commit time.
Well for just EAMs, that's pretty much is the same as the first 2 hubs I worked at. Often FT drivers get called in from an extra work list (based on forecast).

But OP is a bid AM air driver. Around here our hubs & centers have feeders bring the regular air, and have a bid am shuttle driver go to our air gateway, pull the EAMs off the belt, and bring those back separately from the regular air. Then the other bid AM air drvrs and whatever extra EAM drvrs can go deliver. Except the hub I'm at now covers such a large area, I'm 99% certain we have multiple EAM drvrs go to the gateway and leave directly from there.

Also, one of the hubs uses some of the bid AM air drivers to then shuttle the air from that hub to the 'Air Counters', where it's sent out for delivery by Air Walkers...
 

PT Car Washer

Well-Known Member
Well for just EAMs, that's pretty much is the same as the first 2 hubs I worked at. Often FT drivers get called in from an extra work list (based on forecast).

But OP is a bid AM air driver. Around here our hubs & centers have feeders bring the regular air, and have a bid am shuttle driver go to our air gateway, pull the EAMs off the belt, and bring those back separately from the regular air. Then the other bid AM air drvrs and whatever extra EAM drvrs can go deliver. Except the hub I'm at now covers such a large area, I'm 99% certain we have multiple EAM drvrs go to the gateway and leave directly from there.

Also, one of the hubs uses some of the bid AM air drivers to then shuttle the air from that hub to the 'Air Counters', where it's sent out for delivery by Air Walkers...
Which is exactly what our EAM drivers are. PT bid AM air drivers. After EAMs everything else is considered extra work, 10:30 and 12:00 air commits and is given out by seniority. Bid air drivers grieved me coming in and working and lost. Seniority prevails for extra work.
 
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