Supplemental / Temp driver training ~ Ground

Discussion in 'FedEx Discussions' started by OrioN, Oct 22, 2018.

  1. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    No we don’t.
     
  2. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    You've been at this long enough to find yourself in a state of absolute amazement when you see the kind of stuff coming down that belt in the morning if they can even get it to go down the belt at all. No business being on a small a box carrier to begin with. But, that's your salesmen for you, out there signing up whatever they they thing they can away with. And every year at this time they're out there overselling the service.
    BTW, here it is Sunday morning and the USPS Sunday box car just went by.
    Get ready Ground grunts 365 is on it's way.
     
  3. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    Yes. They’ve made that clear.
     
  4. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    4C786D44-FBD2-40E3-B139-1AE76DCBB933.jpeg
    I run my business for profit, loading generates no revenue. This isn’t hard to follow.
     
  5. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    Don't make a lot of Sunday plans or commitments because you might just yourselves the Sunday mule of the last resort especially if a bad Mid Western or "Noreaster" blizzard slows everything down to a crawl.
     
  6. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    And yet you keep assuring me that it's not in YOUR vocabulary.
     
  7. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    Lol. I don’t even do Saturdays. Don’t know why you think I’d do Sundays.
     
  8. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    Should we add these two days to the other five?
     
  9. bbsam

    bbsam Moderator Staff Member

    I do. You may do as you like.
     
  10. dmac1

    dmac1 Active Member

    So the only time revenue is generated is when you hand the package to the recipient?????? That's sounds foolish, not saying you are a fool, but you can't make any money if the package isn't loaded. Seems like common sense that loading is part of the profit generation.
     
  11. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    Not for me. Fedex loads the trucks. I don’t even organize them. My routes are planned like that to be completed in around 8 hours. Any time drivers spend loading is wasted uncompensated time. There’s a reason @OrioN is out until 11pm, he probably wastes a few hours tying down his cargo everyday. If some boxes get bounced around during the day and it costs Fedex a damage claim, I’m not losing sleep over it.
     
  12. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    I agree with the amount of time tying down the freight but simply loading and sorting your freight cuts time on road. That's a fact.
     
  13. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    If that was factual, UPS would have their drivers in organizing their trucks before dispatch. They don’t because it’s not a fact.
     
  14. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    UPS doesn't have it's drivers load because it takes away available hours on road. Ttku
     
  15. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    They measure their driver’s efficiency to the fraction of a second for deliveries. If driver sorting would save them time on the clock they’d do it. It’s cheaper to have package handlers load and drivers find the boxes while delivering. For me it’s even more so as I don’t pay anything for loaders. This is simple math, don’t over think it.
     
  16. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    Loaders load according to stop order although they don't always do a good job of it. Ask any UPS driver if they were allowed to sort before leaving the building how much time it save them on road. Many do it off the clock. It really isn't that hard to understand.
     
  17. It will be fine

    It will be fine Well-Known Member

    You know I can do the job too, right? I don’t just manage. You’re wrong, but evidence won’t convince you. I have drivers that are the same way. I just roll my eyes when they whine about how long they spend loading in the morning and tell them when I run their routes I don’t load a package and finish at the exact same time.
     
  18. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    Tis the season. I see ads everywhere placed by contractors desperate for peak season help.
    Many simply refuse to spend the money on part time workforce development and retention . Granted, for small scale contractors it's a damn expensive undertaking but the days of getting away with not having to do it are becoming fewer in number.
     
  19. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    If you finish at the same time as your drivers, your drivers obviously suck balls. I can run circles around my manager with one hand tied behind my back. There is a reason why we at Express fine sort our trucks. It saves time on road when you know where every single package ision your truck. Hunting for packages in a unorganized truck eats up a lot of time during the day. Again it really isn't that hard to understand.
     
  20. dmac1

    dmac1 Active Member

    I always loaded by zone meaning that I spent little time loading, but still knew almost exactly where the package was and manifest stop number meant nothing , and in most cases, I saw the package a couple times more while grabbing the package for the current stop. Fedex stop numbers meant nothing on my rural route because the route could change drastically every day because of just 1-2 packages being so far off the path. And when I grabbed the package for the current stop, I always located the package for the next stop, and if small enough, put it next to the drivers seat. If I had allowed anyone else to load by stop number, I would have been screwed with packages buried. My route ran about 30 miles along a freeway and 20 miles into the forests on either side, with some deliveries separated by 20 or more miles because roads didn't all connect- Roads ran parallel to the freeway miles away with one package sometimes throwing off the whole route. Computer routing ALWAYS started me closest to the terminal and ended me at furthest point, while sometimes (often) the most efficient was to make a loop, or a loop inside a loop, or a figure 8, with sometimes the last cluster of stops in a town being the last stops of the day, or possibly one stop on my way home 50 miles from my next to last stop. But no matter what order I delivered in, I always knew where the package was in the truck. The one-off rural stops were one 'zone' in themselves, even if they may have been 100 miles apart by road between them.