Making the switch to express?

Discussion in 'FedEx Discussions' started by Homedeliveryguy, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. Mutineer

    Mutineer Active Member

    Cali is in Colombia. And nobody cares about their labor laws. If they have any. Or anything else that goes on there. Far away place. Folks within their jurisdiction probably get tarred and feathered for saying anything bad about their Queen. Or, whatever they worship there. Might even have a national holiday of Baile con chivos every leap year or full moon. Dunno. Don't care. Cuz Cali is in Colombia.
     
  2. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    Except for any reason that is protected by law.
     
  3. Mutineer

    Mutineer Active Member

    That much has been covered. Ad-Nauseum. In fact, it should go without saying that any law can't violate or conflict with another existing law. Right? I mean, everybody knows that going in. Unless you want to pick nits or split hairs. Or to point out irony or a Catch-22. And only sadists enjoy that.

    But where I'm confused is why you mention anything about Cali laws. Cuz Cali is in Colombia.

    Sorry for pestering you about that. But it's just not 100% clear what you meant. And I want to be sure. Or does it go without saying?
     
  4. floridays

    floridays Well-Known Member

    Cali is an easy term, I lived there, we called it cali, kinda like the 60 or the 10 or the 5. You don't have to be so picky, you can find a lot of other things to bust his pelotas about. Outside of fedex discussions, he offers a huge target.
    My opinion only.
     
  5. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    Ok ,then you tell me how I am misusing the term.
     
  6. McFeely

    McFeely Huge Member

    I've always used per diem in reference to my daily meal allowance my employer allotted when traveling for work.
     
  7. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    Per diem (Latin for "per day" or "for each day") or daily allowance is a specific amount of money an organization gives an individual, often an employee, perday to cover living expenses when traveling for work.
     
  8. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    Psssssttttt.............that's what statutory means!
     
  9. Jkloc420

    Jkloc420 Well-Known Member

    @Gumby is cleaning his blue uniform
     
  10. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    Right, if they're already receiving a salary but as is the case with most Ground contractor employees they're not receiving a salary or any other form of compensation for that matter. Therefore they are paid on a per day basis and as you pointed out "per diem" is Latin for "per day".
    The more important question is how much longer will the practice of paying per diems to employees performing a type of work that has historically paid by the hour be permitted to continue?
     
  11. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    Not challenging what "per diem" translates, but to what it refers to. It's not compensation for work performed, it's reimbursement for traveling expenses for work. :fishbashsmile:.
     
  12. bacha29

    bacha29 Well-Known Member

    But it's not that limited in it's scope. In my area there are public school superintendents who are quitting all the time. There is a gentleman a retired superintendent who has been hired numerous times to fill in on a daily basis until a permanent successor can be hired. Now given that it's not known when that successor will be hired that temporary superintendent is not payed a salary but rather a flat rate per day for as long as his presence is needed nothing more. It is called a per diem and the minutes of the board meeting which is a legal document reviewed an approved by the board's solicitor describes it as a per diem.
     
  13. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    Pssssttt....... Thus you cannot be fired for ANY reason.
     
  14. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    I'd run THAT theory past a lawyer before I tested it!
     
  15. 59 Dano

    59 Dano This is 1980, can't you afford a f***ing haircut?

    It's true and I know it. FedEx has a discipline policy because (and this may be a stunning revelation to you) it's a good idea for managers, subordinates, and everyone else to understand what the rules are as well as the consequences for violating them.

    LOL, why do you bother? A discipline policy wouldn't limit your liability in such a lawsuit. You're either guilty of wrongful termination or you aren't.

    Would you like to know where most of these types of lawsuits against FedEx end up? I'll tell you -- dismissed or dropped. Why? Because most of them are "I'm [whatever] and they fired me, [whatever]ISM!!" and actually proving them is incredibly difficult when that's how you look at things.
     
  16. 59 Dano

    59 Dano This is 1980, can't you afford a f***ing haircut?

    Exactly, but some people choose the dumbest hills to die on. Hell, he could listen to the call-the-lawyer show on the radio on the weekends and figure it out. But no, he's going to dig his heels in because... reasons.
     
  17. 59 Dano

    59 Dano This is 1980, can't you afford a f***ing haircut?

    As I wrote earlier, "You can legally be fired for any reason (and for no reason at all) with the exceptions being the reasons you listed."

    And Tupac replied that that wasn't the case. Now he says it is.

    Oh, to be the confused fan of a dead rapper who believes in Jimmy Garoppolo.
     
  18. MAKAVELI

    MAKAVELI Well-Known Member

    A valid reason is one that is not protected. Hence the statement that you can not be fired for any reason. No wonder you were or still are a manager at FedEx. Talking out of both sides of your mouth is a specialty.
     
  19. Fred's Myth

    Fred's Myth Nonhyphenated American

    Still wrong.
    In California you can be terminated for ANY reason as long as it is not ILLEGAL (as was noted). Valid is not the same thing as legal.
    NO reason is the same as ANY reason in this situation.
     
  20. 59 Dano

    59 Dano This is 1980, can't you afford a f***ing haircut?

    Pros vs Joes. Good luck, Joe.